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I have a question about Bear size. I have always gone by size of ears and if floppy or not in photos. Some go by size of bear by barrel. Had a guy tell me last year he puts food in cinder blocks and puts them on top of each other to judge size. Which sounded like good idea. How tall is a good bear over 250 lets say? Hopefully bear judges aren't like fisherman and judge the 15lbers to 25lbers! Capt Ed
 

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From NAHC

1. Ears. Big bears appear to have small ears, because their heads are so large. A small bear will have ears that appear to be relatively large, sitting more on the very top of the head. The larger the bear, the more the ears appear to be on the side of the head. Also, a record-book class bear will have ears that are probably at least 8 inches apart between the inside tips.
2. Front Feet. Measure the track of a front pad, add one, change inches to feet, and you have the approximate size the bear's hide will square. Thus, a 5½-inch foot pad will carry a 6½-foot boar. Females rarely have front feet that exceed 4½ inches in length. It must be stressed that this is just a rule of thumb, and there are exceptions to every rule. With bears, though, these exceptions are few and far between.
3. Body Length. A female rarely exceeds 5½ feet in length. Mature males are longer than that, with many trophy-class bears often measuring more than 6 feet from nose to tail.
4. Snout. Big bears have what appears to be a short, squarish snout. We often refer to these snouts as a "stovepipe nose" set on a squarish head. Younger bears and females have what appears to be a longish, pointed snout set on a more sloping head.
5. Beer Belly. A big male will have a large belly, even in spring, that will appear to almost brush the ground when he walks. This belly is much more defined in fall than in spring, when bears have yet to put on their winter weight. Younger bears have smaller, flatter bellies.
6. Height. A larger-than-average bear, when standing on all fours, will have a backline that reaches to, or above, the waist of an average-size man. If there is an upright 55-gallon drum at a bait site, it will have a pair of rings around it. If the bear's backline reaches above the second ring, it's a good bear.
7. Cubs. Big boars are loners, except during the rut, which occurs in late spring and early summer. Boars hate cubs. If there are cubs with a larger bear, it's a female. If the cubs scamper up a tree and the female begins to act nervous, get ready--a boar has possibly moved in.
 

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Here's the simplest easiest trick if you don't have a barrel(public land). On a tree above your bait (assuming you set it next to a tree and built a crib), tie, nail or somehow affix a 5ft white birch sapling horizontal to the ground. A "good" bear will be approx 5 ft from nose to tail. If the bear is smaller than your measuring stick, pass him. If he is as long as your measuring stick, or bigger, dump him. The good thing about the birch sapling is that it will show up in low light. On public land, where you cant use nails, use two stap on tree steps.

Hugh
 

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A good bear is taller than a upright 55 gal drum anything shorter should be left alone. I have 100s of pictures of bear raiding my barrels whose backs are as tall or taller.

You'll know a big bear when you see one, if you think he is on the small side he is. If you think is even close to being small he is.
 
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