Michigan Sportsman Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just doing some thinking and woundered when people are setting up there property are they looking to encourage an exterior to interior movement or the opposite...by exterior to interior movement I mean setting up your bedding areas towards the exterior of your property and food plotting more towards the center, in theory this is supposed to influence the travel of your deer towards the center of your property..by setting up your property for exterior movement (bedding towards center) you can control how secure their sanctuary is..hows your property laid out?
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
844 Posts
Just doing some thinking and woundered when people are setting up there property are they looking to encourage an exterior to interior movement or the opposite...by exterior to interior movement I mean setting up your bedding areas towards the exterior of your property and food plotting more towards the center, in theory this is supposed to influence the travel of your deer towards the center of your property..by setting up your property for exterior movement (bedding towards center) you can control how secure their sanctuary is..hows your property laid out?
Posted via Mobile Device
Multiple bedding areas, both on the exterior (facing neighbors) and on the interior facing screens is my plan.

Water holes near every bedding area.

My goal is to make the entire property a sanctuary. Sanctuary to me means 'where deer feel safe'.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
30,795 Posts
Does bed for convenience, bucks bed for security.
I'm not awfully concerned about feeding deer, maybe just providing a snack so the majority of my property is being manipulated for cover. That said I'll put buck bedding cover in the core and doe bedding on the perimeter where any neighbor that's not aware of my designated bedding areas, passing will "bump" the deer to my interior.
On a small property adequate and well designed screening and entry exit routes can't be compromised, IMO.

Big T
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,585 Posts
Creating a sanctuary, that you never go into, even a small one around 5, 10, 20 acres in the middle of your property,or on a section that you feel wouldn't get any intrusion from your neighbors with food plots, water holes, etc nearby but still on your property would basically keep the deer from leaving your property until after dark and still have them return before light.

For me personally I wouldn't have the bedding surrounding the food plots because then you would be severely limited in trying to hunt those deer that are traveling from bed to food, without intruding on their bedding area in some way or hunting with limited wind directions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
My property is a long 20 acre rectangle running east to west. All swamp with small 2 1/2 acre field on north side. So, my property is set up as the whole swamp as sancturary and just hunt north side and have a spot on southwest corner. Working on screening in my field this spring with spruces long term and egyptian wheat short term.:evil:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,721 Posts
I am not really sure what I am going to do, but inward movement sounds more logical for me. Two property lines are boarderd by roads, one is a neighbor who hunts 1 or 2 days a year and the property looks like a park and the other is boarderd by a 100 acre crop field. Once I learn more on how to set up a property I will have a better idea of what I should do.
Either way the goal is like Manthus said, 'where deer feel safe'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,131 Posts
If you are talking small properties, I would say, give me the Bedding to the interior. If you have deer bedding all around your perimeter, you would not be able to access it through the interior without your scent blowing into some of the bedding areas.
If your bedding is to the interior then you can move around the perimeter to access stands depending on the wind.
Now on larger properties you could have a destination plot to the interior and still have room to have the deer bed toward the outside as long as you leave enough room for hunter access from the exterior.
Having only 10 acres myself that is 250' wide by 1750' deep running East to West, hunter access is a challenge when trying to place bedding. I will no doubt be walking very close to bedding as I enter my property to hunt. I do have a nice 1 1/2 acre thicket on the far West edge of my property that is situated nice for hunting, I never have to walk past it or worry about bumping deer from it as I come in from the East.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,660 Posts
Inward or outward really depends on what hand you've been dealt.

My parcel functions as a funnel between two areas of large cover so I really just try to focus movement throughout the length of my parcel. My neighbors have some cover that borders mine, so since I'm not 100% of the funnel it does take some work.

For people working with smaller parcels, 10s and 20s, you really can't locate your desired bedding areas away from the neighbors unless you have some really unique topography. In those cases I'd suggest placement such that if your neighbors go near it the deer will already know that they are coming and slip out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,451 Posts
My land is 25 acres and mostly swamp. So the land controlled where I made my plots and bedding areas. So I had to go with outward movement for most part. The property is skinny and very long 1/2 mile West to East, So I've been trying to get East and West movement 1/2 mile worth. I just made sure where the neighbors (well one neighbor the other one has been alright) hunt the deer dont leave my land and walk right in front of them. As Osxer said Unique, It also is creek bottom and limits the neighbors to only hunt the hard ground which leaves roughly a 100+ acre sanctuary bordering it. Don't really matter what kind of movement I get as long as they move by my stand at 20 yds.:D We been working very hard the last 5-6 yrs on it. I have a google scribble map of it and all that we've done to it, not to sure how to post it. Not sure I would either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I like to leave myself with plenty of different stand sites in relation to food, travel and bedding..if its a property with inward movement (bedding outside edges, food centered) I think it limits your hunting opportunities a bit because it doesn't allow you to hunt a food source or travel to a food source because you don't have a downwind blocker unless the property is skinny and you can hunt the edges..same with outward movement, with food plots wrapping your property it doesn't give much opportunity for bedding area stands which are my favorite...
Posted via Mobile Device
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
I'm sure most of us have seen this picture some time or another. Ed describes the layout of this 120 acre wooded parcel on his website. Inward movement makes the most sense to me. If your bedding areas are spaced far enough apart that you can slip in between them to get between your big field for early morning/later evening hunts, and have trails connecting the bedding areas to other bedding areas, as well as small, secure plots tucked in close to bedding areas for mid-day or all day sits.

I could see a few of these stand sites being a little iffy when it comes to scent control, but most of them set up correctly, especially on the west side.

This habitat management stuff is like a sickness! I carry around aerial maps of different properties to doodle on in school. Everyone thinks I'm nuts. But hey, its better than texting.

 

·
Banned
Joined
·
668 Posts
Both inward and outward movement, inward in the morning and outward at night.
 

·
Tornado Jim
Joined
·
19,989 Posts
This general concept of having a central sanctuary/bedding area with inward morning movement and outward evening movement was the subject of a very controversial thread on the QDMA forums. It was started by Don Higgins, the well known whitetail hunter and sports writer. http://www.qdma.com/forums/showthread.php?t=30230

In the thread, Don proposes an ideal situation in which most of the central part of a property is sanctuary, and the hunter enters only the edges. Below is a depiction of the general idea of a central sanctuary. Hereafter referred to as an outward layout, referring to the direction of movement in the evening, which in my view is the central flaw in a central layout, pun intended.

Beige areas are doe bedding areas in sanctuaries. Red lines are day time movements of mature bucks--roads on east and south. Grey boxes are houses. Red arrows are evening deer movement. X marks property access sites.



Contrast that with the situation I face, which I will call the inward approach, with the second illustration being roughly how one of my properties is set up. In this case, the sanctuaries are located on the periphery of the property. And there are several substantial food sources towards the center of the property. Green areas are destination food plots of one acre or more. Although some deer are led out to the SW, in fact they are a long way from the neighbors, and have open areas between them and the ag fields across the road so will not move in that direction until after dark. I think this is one of the most important things about property layout--letting the property tell you what is and is not the right thing rather than having a single dogmatic view of how it should be laid out.



The main advantage to the outward approach is said to be that the hunter can hunt only the edges and minimize intrusion on the property. That would be true if the hunter has access from all direction, But in most cases we don't. In both illustrations, I am showing the access points I have to my property, which are limited to the south and east sides.

Let's compare and contrast the two approaches, and consider it in the context of Michigan hunting, with almost every surrounding property being heavily pressured. I am showing you that all of the surrounding properties are hunted--even the houses across the road to the east are 5-20 acre pieces some of which have hunting stands on them. They are all hunted by hunters who will shoot any buck, except for the one QDM property to the NW that nearly borders mine--they kill 2.5 yo and older bucks.

If I were to have a central sanctuary, the deer would be completely unaware of what is happening on the surrounding properties on a given day. If a hunter approaches a stand, they will not be in a position to see, hear or smell him. When they get up to move in the evening, they could be headed for trouble without knowing it. The youngest bucks will be the first to leave the property and be most vulnerable. If, instead, I place my sanctuaries at the edge of my property, I optimize for them to be able to be aware of the surrounding hunters. When they get up to move, they will be moving away from danger, not towards it. If a hunter goes so far as to encroach, they have other safety zones they can run to in that there are several sanctuaries and multiple safe routes among them.

This is not so much of a problem in the morning, because the deer are moving from the surrounding ag lands towards the sanctuaries, they will be well aware of the pressure out there, and will move earlier if they sense pressure on the surrounding properties in either scenario.

However, consider this. If the deer are living in an inner sanctuary, they are likely to hold up and wait longer before moving, because they will be moving from safety to danger. With the sanctuary on the periphery, they know exactly where the other hunters are set up, and if they have good food sources towards the center of the property instead of a sanctuary, they are liable to get up earlier and start moving earlier. Most of my neighbors, if they see a deer during gun season at all (after the 16th), will see them just at the edge of light. On my property, I have to be set up in the stand at least 2-3 hours before dark because I know I am going to have movement out of the sanctuaries way before dark. There is no way they will move off my property in day light during gun season, and seldom will they do so during bow season. Why would they? If most of my property was a large, central sanctuary, I would be in pretty much the same situation as my neighbors.

How about day time movement? If there is one large sanctuary with lots of doe groups in it, what reason does a buck have to leave it in day time? Having several peripheral sanctuaries may force day time buck movement. He knows there are does nearby, and because there is heavy cover connecting all the sanctuaries, he feels comfortable moving in day time. It is easy to access pinch points on these travel corridors from the edge of the property. With a central sanctuary, in a very heavily hunted region, most mature bucks will not even leave in day time because they know it is not safe out there. In short, the inward scenario I have drawn for you does have a central sanctuary, it is the central feeding areas that are never hunted. The key thing though, is that the bedding areas are not in the center. They have to leave the bedding areas and move towards the center of the property, because it is not safe to move outwards.

Multiple sanctuaries. Every deer that is shot is going to run to a sanctuary. If most of the center of my property is a sanctuary, then every time I shoot a deer, even a doe, there is a liklihood that they can reach the sanctuary. That means I have to enter the sanctuary to find her.

Having sanctuaries separated by several hundred yards allows one to shoot a doe without compromising a sanctuary. Of course, for morning and evening hunts, especially in late season, one would like to be near a sanctuary for buck hunting. If I shoot a buck near a sanctuary, and have to go in to retrieve him, I still have several other sanctuaries for the deer to move to, and I can hunt them the next day. In fact, in a set-up like this, Doe families set up separate travel paths. By having multiple destination plots rather than one large one, I can keep freaked out does from disrupting the rest of the herd on the farm.

Finally, there is the simple geometric reality that outward movement dissipates deer, lowering the concentration of deer as a function of distance from the center, whereas inward movement concentrates deer, and does so in a safe zone where you can protect young bucks from harvest.

To me, in our state, if the layout of the property allows it, it is a no-brainer to have the deer situated near the borders of a property that gets low hunting pressure using good scent and access control, and is surrounded by high hunting pressure. There is no motivation for the deer to move off your property in day time. You are optimizing the situation so deer are much less likely to move to an unsafe area in day time, and are much more likely to move earlier.

As several posters have said, the lay of the land should be the main criterion in how you lay out sanctuaries.

I have another piece of property that I simply have had to divide in half, with sanctuary on the entire eastern 50%, and travel corridors in and out on the western side of the 47 acre piece. My hand was forced by the circumstances of the eastern boundary--but that is another story.

I do not think one size fits all. But I do think that multiple sanctuaries, ideally placed on the perimeter of the property, with little pressure on the interior of the property, is the preferred approach in a heavily pressured state.

As DXT said above:

Inward movement makes the most sense to me. If your bedding areas are spaced far enough apart that you can slip in between them to get between your big field for early morning/later evening hunts, and have trails connecting the bedding areas to other bedding areas, as well as small, secure plots tucked in close to bedding areas for mid-day or all day sits.
The article that picture is from is here: http://www.deerattraction.com/property1.htm

The only difference in my layout from what Ed proposes is that I have a different definition of "destination" food plot. My goal is for the deer to be on the neighbor's ag fields after dark. I create enough food for them to orient their movement into my property in the evenings, but not so much that they stay there very long. It is simply a safe place for them to eat during day time and wait to move into the ag fields at dark.

The notion that you cannot access property from the edges with peripheral or multiple sanctuaries as easily as you can with a single central sanctuary just doesn't compute with me.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top