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I'd go with a 9'6"-10'0" in a 6wt. It can be a steelhead rod, but Idealy you'd probably want at least a 7wt. IMHO. Just stick to larger ares where you have some room to play the fish. Good luck.

Al
 

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No it's not. But that's me, and not other's. I am getting to where I want the fish in asap, so I am going to heavier rod's. If you plan on keeping the fish, then go for it. If not, I would go with at least a 7wt, more backbone.


Good Luck
 

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my take on this would be to match the rod for the water, conditions, and methods you are using.

i have a 9' fast act 6wt that i occasionaly use on small tribs. especialy when not many lg fish are present. a 10'6wt is standard fare while on the med sized tribs i fish alot.

a 10' to 11' 6wt has a couple of things going for it. they have a super cussion effect alowing use of ultra lt leaders. also if you like to indi fish the line control advantages cannot be ignored. the overall weight of the rod can be a factor as well, especialy when a whole day of hi sticking is the plan.

if i wanted to cover a wider spectrum of steelchasing with only one rod then i would say no, a 6wt is to light. hope this was some help, SG
 

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I'd have to say depends on the person and conditions. To many, a 10' 6wt. is an ideal tool for steelhead. While others prefer 7s or even 8s, though i think the latter is a bit overkill. I have known people to fish with 5 wts. and a friend of mine even landed a 14.5lb steel on a 7'9" 4 wt. (long story). Basically find something that you are comfortable with, get a good reel, and you will be alright.

steve
 

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i fish with an 8# g-loomis but thats my preferance. but id say the most important is the reel. buy a good reel that will last many years. i use a ross cimmaron #4. the reel works great for steelhead an salmon. great drag on it an you can also palm to get just that extra stopping power.
 

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I've found that you can get a 10' rod in...say a 7 wt, and it will feel similar to a 6 wt. Most ten foot rods tend to be lighter in power than nine footers. The 10' 7 wt will give you the backbone you need too. Just something I have noticed.
 

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IDEAL WEIGHT FOR STEELHEAD ROD ,,,,,,,,,I'm not much of a steelhead fisherman these days but I do have some opinions based on experience, and some simple observations. Spending a lifetime in the engineering enviornment forces you to think things over in parculilar ways.

Firstly, I think all too often emphasis is placed on the weight, or length of a rod but seldom both colletively, and their subsequent interaction with each other. Physics would tell you that the longer the rod, the more leverage the fish has against you. Consider the effect of even a small steelhead with lets say a 15 ft rod (exaggerated for clarity). Consider the same steelhead on an 8 footer. It's easy to see that the longer the lever (rod), the more energy it will take to control it. You'll see evidence of that when fishermen grab overly long rods well above the grip in an attempt to gain leverage on the fish. Long rods are nice for the type of casting steelhead fishing requires however, you reach a point of diminishing returns quickly. The 8 footer on the other hand gives you more of an advantage for loading the fish but lacks length to steer it notwithstanding it's casting limitations.

Regardless of length: A 6 wt rod will load a 6wt flyline nicely for casting purposes. A steelhead will load, if not overload it much quicker. When it's all said and done, the heavier weight rod you have the more strength it will have overall. Looked at this way, it's easy to see that the strength of the rod has nothing to do with the leverage advantage or disadvantage of shorter or longer rods respectivly.

Personally I think something in the 8 1/2' 8wt allows the best preformance overall. Admittedly most steelhead fishermen do not like stiff rods and the above suggestion starts pushing the envolope for stiffness.

In a nutshell, I think it's important to not consider the weight of a rod independent of it's length for it's intended purpose!

Just my opinion


Toddfather
 

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I just think there is different ways of fishing.... .some people like an 8 ft -9ft spinning rod, while others much prefer a 10-12'er. THe longer rods tend to allow you to use lighter line, which some prefer. Also the added length is beneficial as a shock absorber.

the truth is a 6 wt rod has to load the same amount of energy regardless of length. The thing is with the longer length, it needs to store less energy per unit length. This means a lower spring rate basically (yes, i know its a non-linear mat'l, but for all intensive purposes).

since the spring rate is different, and the rod bends differently, the place where the moment would be applied will be different. I do not believe that there is too much of a difference in holding moment between a 10' and a 8.5'er. I believe most of it is in the brain of the fisherman, as they see the rod doubled and think its going to break, even though thats what the rod was designed for.

I personally like fighting the fish to the fullest, maybe even giving the fish a wee bit of an advantage mechanically.

Basically just find what you're comfortable with and hit the river, can't catch anything in front of a computer screen.

These are just a few of my observations.

steve
 
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