Michigan-Sportsman.com banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Doing a little ice awareness safety plug.......here is a good rescue that took place today. Check out the vid. No one was hurt and the dog was safely rescued.

February 03, 2015

Contact: Chief Petty Officer Alan Haraf
Email: [email protected]
Office: (630) 986-2157
Mobile: (216) 389-0420
VIDEO & PHOTOs: Coast Guard crew rescues dog from icy Betsie Bay near Frankfort Shipping Channel


Petty Officer 3rd Class Tim Putnam of Coast Guard Station Frankfort, Mich., warms up the dog that he rescued from the ice-filled waters of Betsie Bay of the Frankfort Shipping Channel, Feb. 3, 2015. Putnam swam nearly 200 feet in his ice rescue gear to reach the dog, before both were pulled back to shore by other members of the rescue team. (Coast Guard photo by Ed Carter)
FRANKFORT, Mich. – An ice rescue team from Coast Guard Station Frankfort pulled a dog to safety Tuesday, after it jumped into icy Betsie Bay near the Frankfort Shipping Channel.
At about 9:45 a.m. local time, Petty Officer 1st Class Kurt Lubbers witnessed, from inside the station, a dog jump into the water on the far side of the Bay. Crewmembers activated the search and rescue alarm and contacted Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan and Benzie County 911.
After donning proper ice rescue gear, Petty Officer 3rd Class Tim Putnam entered the water and swam to the dog. Because of the extensive amount of broken ice in the Bay, it took nearly 20 minutes for Putnam to swim about 200 feet to reach the dog.
Once Putnam grabbed the animal, he signaled to members of the shore party, who pulled the pair back to shore.
Petty Officer 1st Class Jeremy Morris entered the water to assit the exhausted Putnam across the last several feet to a six-foot high break wall. Petty Officer 2nd Class Elijah Webb then pulled the dog up to the wall to safety. Because of the amount of ice on the break wall and nearby ladders, Putnam and Morris had to be pulled up by other members of the rescue team with a rescue sling, and with the help of passersby Donald Ruff and Steve Brown.
The crew brought the dog into the station’s boathouse where it was dried off and warmed. Benzie County Animal Control took the collarless animal to the Animal Welfare League of Benzie County, where it was given a clean bill of health. The dog will be kept in quarantine for several days unless an owner is identified.
“This was a total team effort by the members of our station and Mr. Brown and Mr. Ruff who assisted getting our members up the wall and back onto dry land,” said Senior Chief Petty Officer Robert Nendza, officer of charge of Station Frankfort. “Our crews train regularly for ice rescues, and in this case, we wanted to make sure we were the ones taking the risk of going onto the water instead of an unprepared bystander.”
The Coast Guard recommends all pet owners keep a careful eye on their animals, especially around ice. This Coast Guard blog post from last year addresses safety tips for dogs and their owners.
For more information on the dog's condition or on the Animal Welfare League of Benzie County, send an email to [email protected] or visit them at www.facebook.com/BenzieCountyAnimalShelter

This was a news release from yesterday talking about the high number of ice cases.


February 02, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
Devil's blanket may be one reason for unusually high number of recent ice rescues

Coast Guard urging people to take appropriate ice-safety precautions

This video from Minnesota Department of Natural Resources demonstrates how to create ice picks for self-rescue in the event you fall through the ice.CLEVELAND — Rescues in Saginaw Bay, Michigan, Sunday evening and Lake Erie Monday morning are the latest in an alarmingly high number of Great Lakes ice rescues since Saturday, prompting a Coast Guard reminder of the risk of venturing out onto the ice and of the importance of taking appropriate safety precautions.
Throughout the weekend the Coast Guard, good Samaritans and the Bay County, Michigan Fire Department rescued eight and assisted six people across the lakes, an unusually high number attributed in part to a milder winter and environmental conditions like "the devil's blanket."
The names and hometowns of the rescued and assisted are not being released.
At about 7:30 p.m. Sunday, a 911 operator contacted search-and-rescue controllers at the Coast Guard Sector Detroit Command Center to report a disoriented man on Saginaw Bay in blizzard conditions. The man called 911 from his cell phone, allowing the dispatchers to determine his coordinates before losing communication with him.
The command center contacted Coast Guard Station Saginaw River, in Essexville, Michigan, to dispatch a rescue crew aboard a 20-foot rescue air boat.
The man managed to make another phone call to 911 after he had fallen through the ice and climbed back out. Dispatchers instructed him to turn on his flashlight, and though visibility was less than 1,000 yards, the light made it possible for the rescuers to find him, and they safely transported him to shore.
"My ice rescue crews spend more time on the frozen Saginaw Bay than anyone, and every one of us has learned that ice conditions are unpredictable,” said Master Chief Petty Officer Terry W. Lathrop, officer in charge of Station Saginaw, home of the National Ice Rescue School. “One thing we can say with certainty is that the ice will almost never be as thick as it was last year, so don't go out expecting 30 inches of ice.”
Coast Guard rescuers believe that inaccurate expectations, along with heavy snow cover, contibute to the high number of rescues this weekend.
"Our nickname for heavy snow cover is the devil's blanket, because it covers up visual signs of thin ice and also insulates the water and ice underneath, which prevents new ice from forming in cold temperatures.”
Other common reasons people find themselves in trouble on the ice are lack of familiarization with the area and a failure to check weather forecasts before going out.
Lathrop encourages people to remember the acronym “I.C.E.” when it comes to ice safety and when planning to venture out on the lakes. The acronym stands for Information, Clothing and Equipment:
Information – Check the weather and ice conditions; tell a friend of your intended destination; know who and how to call for help; be familiar with the area you plan to go, especially when going after dark or during inclement weather.
Clothing – Wear sufficient clothing, including a dry suit, to prevent hypothermia. Choose bright colors and reflective garments to aid searchers if you should end up needing help.
Equipment – Never venture onto the ice without proper safety equipment: a marine radio, a Personal Locator Beacon, a life jacket, a compass or GPS, and screw drivers or ice picks which may allow you to pull yourself out of the water should you break through.
The Coast Guard also encourages ice enthusiasts to reach out to local response agencies, snowmobile clubs and ice-fishing bait shops to inquire about ice conditions before heading out.
Below are brief summaries of weekend rescues.
Saturday morning good Samaritans assisted two people in Lost Peninsula Marina near Toledo, Ohio, after their snowmobiles fell through the ice.
Saturday night, the Bay County, Michigan, Fire Department rescued three people on Saginaw Bay near Linwood, Michigan, after their snowmobiles fell through the ice. Two of the rescued people were in good condition while the third was taken to McLaren Hospital in Mount Clemens, Michigan.
Just after midnight Sunday morning, a Coast Guard rescue crew from Coast Guard Station Toledo, Ohio, rescued two and assisted two others after their snowmobiles fell through the ice in North Maumee Bay.
Sunday night, two people were assisted to safety by a good Samaritan after they became lost in a snow storm on Lake Erie near Marblehead, Ohio.
Early Monday morning, a good Samaritan rescued a man who was lost on Lake Erie overnight near Catawba State Park, Ohio, after he became disoriented on the ice during a snow storm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,355 Posts
The Coastguard helicopter will be in Tawas Saturday to do a demonstration for Perchville USA.:help: Good job to the CG and thanks for the link John.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
No sweat....glad to put them up. The Coasties and the dog were on Fox and Friends Thursday morning doing interviews. He seemed like a friendly pooch. Glad the rescue turned out ok.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
This one turned out good.....




February 09, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
US Coast Guard aids 5 on Saginaw Bay

The images below are stock photos from a similar search and rescue response in Saginaw Bay two years ago.An ice rescue crew, from Coast Guard Station Saginaw River, in Essexville, Mich., and two rescued men walk across the ice toward the Coast Guard's Special Purpose Craft-Air and away from their 4-wheeler, which will be salvaged by the owners at another time, Feb. 18, 2013.
The two men were ice fishing when the ice floe broke free and left the men stranded four miles east of Hampton Charter Township, Mich.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher Wolner.
An ice rescue crew aboard a Special Purpose Craft-Air, from Coast Guard Station Saginaw River, in Essexville, Mich., returns to shore after rescuing two men from an ice floe in Saginaw Bay near Hampton Charter Township, Mich., Feb. 18, 2013.
The two men were ice fishing when the ice floe broke free and left the men stranded.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Christopher Wolner.

CLEVELAND — The U.S. Coast Guard assisted two adults and three children on Saginaw Bay after the family became disoriented due to low visibility while riding on an all-terrain vehicle Sunday evening.
The people's names are not being released and there is no Coast Guard video or imagery available for this case.
Around 6:15 p.m., command center watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Detroit received a call from 911 dispatch reporting two adults and three kids were disoriented on Saginaw Bay.
A crew from Coast Guard Station Saginaw River, in Essexville, Michigan, launched aboard a 20-foot airboat to locate the people. Dispatchers used the caller's cell phone signal to triangulate the family's position, and Sector Detroit vectored the rescue crew to where the five were located.
The rescue team escorted all five and their ATV back to shore. No injuries were reported.
"Being familiar with the area you are in is just as important this time of the year as it is during the summer," said Chief Petty Officer Gabriel Settel, the assistant command center chief at Coast Guard Sector Detroit. "Check the weather before going out, and be sure you are aware of current ice conditions. Having a reliable way to call for help, like a marine radio or an electronic position indicating radio beacon, is also a must."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
February 14, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
U.S. Coast Guard assists 2 Canadian snowmobilers near Kingsville, Ontario

CLEVELAND — The U.S. Coast Guard assisted two snowmobilers near Kingsville, Ontario, after they became stranded nearly two miles off the Canadian side of Lake Erie, Saturday morning.
The names of the individuals assisted are not being released by the Coast Guard, and there is no Coast Guard imagery for this case.
At around 10:15 a.m., a search-and-rescue coordinator at the Coast Guard's 9th District Rescue Coordination Center in Cleveland, responded to a call for assistance from personnel at the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Trenton, Ontario. JRCC Trenton reported that there were two snowmobilers stranded offshore of Kingsville, who were concerned about the stability of the ice around them.
The SAR coordinator at the 9th District directed the launch of an air crew, from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit, aboard a Dolphin helicopter. The aircrew arrived on scene with the snowmobilers at about 11:15 a.m., safely hoisted them into the helicopter and transferred them to the ferry dock in Kingsville where they were met by local fire department personnel at about 11:30 a.m.
The snowmobilers needed no further medical attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
The story with pics.


February 15, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
*UPDATE* PHOTOS: U.S. Coast Guard assists 2 Canadian snowmobilers near Kingsville, Ontario

First responders from Kingsville, Ontario, prepare for rescue efforts of two individuals who were stranded two miles offshore of Kingsville on unstable ice, Feb. 14, 2015.
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit hoisted the two individuals from their location on the ice and transported them to the Kingsville ferry docks where they where met by Kingsville first responders.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Walter and Tegan Fredenhagen
First responders from Kingsville, Ontario, prepare for rescue efforts of two individuals who were stranded two miles offshore of Kingsville on unstable ice, Feb. 14, 2015.
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit hoisted the two individuals from their location on the ice and transported them to the Kingsville ferry docks where they where met by Kingsville first responders.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Walter and Tegan Fredenhagen
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit arrives at the Kingsville, Ontario, ferry docks after hoisting two individuals from unstable ice about two miles offshore of Kingsville, Feb. 14, 2015.
The aircrew then transported them to the Kingsville ferry docks where they where met by Kingsville first responders.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Walter and Tegan Fredenhagen
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit lands in the snow at the Kingsville, Ontario, ferry docks after hoisting two individuals from unstable ice about two miles offshore of Kingsville, Feb. 14, 2015.
The aircrew then transported them to the Kingsville ferry docks where they where met by Kingsville first responders.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Walter and Tegan Fredenhagen
An aircrew from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit and first responders from Kingsville, Ontario, after a successful rescue of two individuals who were stranded two miles offshore of Kingsville on unstable ice, Feb. 14, 2015.
The aircrew hoisted the two individuals and transported them to the Kingsville ferry docks where they where met by Kingsville first responders.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Walter and Tegan Fredenhagen


CLEVELAND — The U.S. Coast Guard assisted two snowmobilers near Kingsville, Ontario, after they became stranded nearly two miles off the Canadian side of Lake Erie, Saturday morning.
The names of the individuals assisted are not being released by the Coast Guard, and there is no Coast Guard imagery for this case.
At around 10:15 a.m., a search-and-rescue coordinator at the Coast Guard's 9th District Rescue Coordination Center in Cleveland, responded to a call for assistance from personnel at the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Trenton, Ontario. JRCC Trenton reported that there were two snowmobilers stranded offshore of Kingsville, who were concerned about the stability of the ice around them.
The SAR coordinator at the 9th District directed the launch of an aircrew, from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit, aboard a Dolphin helicopter. The aircrew arrived on scene with the snowmobilers at about 11:15 a.m., safely hoisted them into the helicopter and transferred them to the ferry dock in Kingsville where they were met by local fire department personnel at about 11:30 a.m.
The snowmobilers needed no further medical attention.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Ya know things are busy when the CGC Bramble runs low on food while out ice breaking and has to have some delivered by helo. Those will be expensive sandwiches.:coolgleam


February 20, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
PHOTOs: US, Canadian Coast Guards working to free laker near Ashtabula, Ohio

The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Bristol Bay breaks ice outside of Ashtabula, Ohio, Feb. 19, 2015.
The Bristol Bay has encountered ice 8 to 10 feet in Lake Erie and brash ice, which is the jagged landscape, 5 to 6 feet thick.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Cmdr. John Henry
The crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Bristol Bay backs down from a wall of ice as it prepares to ram the wall in efforts to clear a path into Ashtabula, Ohio, Feb. 19, 2015.
The Bristol Bay has encountered ice 8 to 10 feet in Lake Erie and brash ice, which is the jagged landscape, 5 to 6 feet thick.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Cmdr. John Henry
An air crew from Coast Guard Air Station Detroit delivers resupply food to the crew of the Coast Guard Cutter Bristol Bay outside of Ashtabula, Ohio, Feb. 19, 2015.
The crew of the Bristol Bay has been battling ice 8-10 feet thick in Lake Erie, and it was taking longer than anticipated to open a path into Ashtabula and the cutter's crew was running low on food.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Charlie Kelly
CLEVELAND — The U.S. and Canadian Coast Guards are working together to break free the motor vessel Arthur M. Anderson, which is beset in ice near Conneaut Harbor, and turn it around in Lake Erie so it can head to Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, for its winter layup.
The Coast Guard Cutter Bristol Bay, a 140-foot ice-breaking tug homeported in Detroit, has been just outside of Ashtabula for several days battling 8 to 10 feet of ice in areas and brash ice up to 5 to 6 feet thick. The progress has been slow in getting into Ashtabula, so the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Griffon has been called to assist. The Griffon is stationed in Prescott, Ontario, and is a 234-foot multi-mission medium icebreaker.
The Arthur M. Anderson is currently outside of Conneaut Harbor awaiting assistance. The Bristol Bay is en route back to Cleveland. The Griffon will join up with the Bristol Bay and they will clear a path into Cleveland. The Bristol Bay will fill up on fuel and will resupply with food. Once a path is cleared into Cleveland, the Griffon will head out to Conneaut Harbor and break free the Anderson.
"The U.S. and Canada have a strong ice-breaking partnership," said Rear Adm. Fred Midgette, commander Coast Guard 9th District. Both countries coordinate closely to respond to these extreme ice conditions across the Great Lakes. Our goal is to get the commercial traffic moving and keep it moving, so we will keep working to achieve that goal.
After working tirelessly for several days and making slow progress, the crew of the Bristol Bay was running low on food for its crew, so a Coast Guard air crew from Air Station Detroit delivered 100 pounds of food via their rescue basket, Thursday night. The delivery was an opportunity for the air crew and the cutter crew to conduct regular hoist training while delivering needed supplies.

  • ICE FLOW - Ice broken up by wind, sea, swells, currents and tides
  • YOUNG ICE - Cold temperatures cause additional freezing at the bottom and along the sides of ice
  • BRASH ICE - Accumulation of floating ice made up of fragments; the wreckage of other forms of ice
  • PANCAKE ICE - A piece of new ice approximately circular with raised rims
 

·
Super Moderator
MMMmmm Scooby Snacks RULE!
Joined
·
16,345 Posts
Good stuff TVC.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
These folks were lucky.......

February 24, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
Coast Guard assists 2 in Lake Erie near Catawba Island

CLEVELAND – The Coast Guard assisted two people back to shore safely after their all-terrain vehicle broke on Lake Erie near Catawba Island, Ohio, Monday night.
The names of the individuals assisted are not being released by the Coast Guard, and there is no Coast Guard imagery for this case.
At about 8:30 p.m., a watchstander at Coast Guard Station Marblehead, Ohio, responded to a call from the people stating that they were exhausted after being stranded on the ice for hours.
The watchstander contacted Coast Guard Sector Detroit, which issued an urgent marine information broadcast requesting assistance from any mariners in the area.
A rescue crew aboard a 20-foot airboat from Coast Guard Station Marblehead launched, found the people and brought them safely to their vehicle on shore.
Both individuals appeared to be in good health.
The Coast Guard will work with the people to coordinate a salvage plan for their ATV to prevent it from becoming a safety or environmental hazard.
The Coast Guard reminds people to remember the acronym I.C.E. before venturing out on or near ice-covered waterways.
Information — Know the weather and ice conditions, know and tell a trusted person on shore where you are going, and know how to call for help. Never go out alone.
Clothing — Wear the proper clothing to prevent hypothermia. Wear a waterproof exposure suit and a life jacket.
Equipment — Carry the proper equipment. Carry two ice picks or screwdrivers, which will help you pull yourself out of the ice if you fall through. They are much more effective than bare hands. Carry a whistle or noise maker to alert people that you are in distress. Carry a cellular phone or marine band radio in a waterproof container so that you can call for help if you come across trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
March 03, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
Saginaw Coast Guard saves 2 who were stranded on ice on Saginaw Bay

A Coast Guardsman helps a man who fell through the ice on Lake Huron near the Bay City Recreation Area Jan. 27, 2011, as part of a four-day ice rescue training class.
Night time training is important because the majority of ice-rescue cases happen at night, and responders who have to locate and rescue a person who fell through the ice at night are faced with additional obstacles.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lauren Jorgensen
EDITORS NOTE: The image used in this release is a training photo from 2011 and is not from this rescue.

CLEVELAND — A Coast Guard ice rescue crew rescued two people after their SUV became disabled on the ice near the mouth of the Saginaw River Monday evening.
The people's names are not being released and there is no Coast Guard video or imagery available for this case.
Just before 9:30 p.m., watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Detroit received a 911 relay call reporting one man and one woman stranded on the ice in Saginaw Bay. The man reported having a pre-existing medical condition, was overdue on his medication and was beginning to feel nauseous.
A crew from Coast Guard Station Saginaw River, located in Essexvile, Michigan, responded aboard a 20-foot airboat and established a communication schedule with the two people on the ice. When the Coast Guardsmen arrived on scene, they recovered both adults and took them to awaiting emergency medical services personnel at a local Department of Natural Resources boat ramp. The man's friend was also waiting with his medication, and the man and woman were both treated and released.
"Any time people go out on the Great Lakes, they should ensure they have a reliable way to call for help," said Mike Baron, the recreational boating safety specialist with the Coast Guard 9th District in Cleveland. "Paired with proper clothing, life jackets and a float plan, a VHF-FM radio or a personal locator beacon can help to keep you safe while you're out enjoying the lakes."
Sector Detroit is issuing a special marine information broadcast about the stranded vehicle while the owner works to have it recovered from the ice as soon as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
I wonder if he was unstable to attempt something like this?

March 05, 2015


Ninth Coast Guard District
Contact: Ninth Coast Guard District External Affairs Office
Email: [email protected]
Office: (216) 902-6020
Mobile: (216) 310-2608
PHOTOS: Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay rescues man walking in middle of Lake St. Clair

The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, home-ported in Cleveland, rescued a 25-year-old man attempting to walk across Lake St. Clair, March 5, 2015.
The crew is transporting the man, a U.S. citizen who was hypothermic, back to shore in Algonac, Mich., where they will be met by emergency medical services.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Josh Zike
The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, home-ported in Cleveland, rescued a 25-year-old man attempting to walk across Lake St. Clair, March 5, 2015.
The crew is transporting the man, a U.S. citizen who was hypothermic, back to shore in Algonac, Mich., where they will be met by emergency medical services.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Josh Zike
The crew of Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, home-ported in Cleveland, rescued a 25-year-old man attempting to walk across Lake St. Clair, March 5, 2015.
The crew is transporting the man, a U.S. citizen who was hypothermic, back to shore in Algonac, Mich., where they will be met by emergency medical services.
U.S. Coast Guard photo by Lt. Josh Zike
CLEVELAND — The Coast Guard rescued a man attempting to walk across Lake St. Clair Thursday morning and is transporting the man to Algonac, Michigan.
The man rescued is a 25-year-old American citizen, who stated he was attempting to walk from Detroit to Toronto.
At about 9:30 a.m., the lookout assigned to Coast Guard Cutter Neah Bay, a 140-foot ice-breaking tug home-ported in Cleveland, spotted a man walking in the middle of frozen Lake St. Clair, about one and a half miles from Seaway Island. The ice-rescue team aboard the cutter deployed on foot to check on the man. Upon reaching the man, the rescue team questioned the individual, treated the man for symptoms of hypothermia, and assisted him aboard the cutter.
The man was taken to the municipal pier in Algonac, where he was met by emergency medical service personnel and transferred to their care.
"Most of us joined the Coast Guard to protect life," said Lt. Joshua Zike, commanding officer of the Neah Bay. "Our primary mission during the winter months is breaking ice to keep commercial traffic moving, but preserving life will always come first."

The man was not dressed appropriately for the conditions out on the lake, was not wearing any flotation gear and had no form of communication.
This rescue conducted by the crew of the Neah Bay is the first rescue of a person conducted by an ice-rescue team deployed from a Great Lakes cutter in more than 4 years.
The cutter arrived at the docks in Algonac at 12:40 p.m. Media interested in conducting interviews with the crew of the Neah Bay in Algonac, should call the Coast Guard 9th District public affairs at 216-902-6020 to coordinate.
The Coast Guard encourages everyone who goes out on the ice to remember the acronym I.C.E.
Information - Know the weather and ice conditions, know and tell a trusted person on shore where you are going, and know how to call for help. Never go out alone.

Clothing - Wear the proper clothing to prevent hypothermia. Wear a waterproof exposure suit and a life jacket.

Equipment - Carry the proper equipment. Carry two ice picks or screwdrivers, which will help you pull yourself out of the ice if you fall through. They are much more effective than bare hands. Carry a whistle or noise maker to alert people that you are in distress. Carry a cellular phone or marine band radio in a waterproof container so that you can call for help if you come across trouble.

March 04, 2015

Contact: Senior Chief Alan Haraf
Email: [email protected]
Office: (630) 986-2157
Mobile: (216) 389-0420
Coast Guard urges caution on, near ice as warmer temperatures arrive

CHICAGO — The Coast Guard is urging people to use extreme caution on and near waterways with the forecast for sustained, warmer temperatures beginning this weekend.
The above freezing-temperatures could pose safety concerns on Lake Michigan and inland rivers, streams and ponds that have become frozen during the past few weeks. Rising temperatures will cause recently-frozen waters to further melt and become weak.
Ice is unpredictable and the thickness can vary, even in small areas. Water currents, particularly around narrow spots, bridges, inlets and outlets, are always suspect for thin ice. Stay away from cracks, seams, pressure ridges, slushy areas and darker areas since these signify thinner ice.
Obstruction such as rocks, logs, vegetation and pilings affect the strength of ice. Heat from these obstructions slows ice formation. Ice shifting and expanding can create pressure cracks and ridges around the obstructions.
In addition, ice near the shore of a frozen lake may be unsafe and weaker because of shifting, expansion, and sunlight reflecting off the bottom.

The Coast Guard is also urging people to remain clear of shorelines, piers, jetties, rocks, walkways and jogging paths that may have become covered in layers of ice. Mother nature may have created winter wonderlands of interesting formations this winter, but people should not let their curiosities take a priority over safety.
People walking their dogs should always keep them on a leash to prevent the pet from falling or jumping into the water.
The 1-10-1 Principle: 1 minute - 10 minutes - 1 hour
Everyone who enters cold water doesn't drown, but research shows that many drowning incidents may be the result of cold shock response and cold incapacitation. In cold water drowning situations, if you survive the first minute, the cold will soon rob your muscles of their strength and dexterity. Even strong swimmers can experience swim failure after a few minutes.
When a cold water drowning situation begins, a person has about one minute to gain control of their breathing and 10 minutes or less of meaningful movement and muscle control to get themselves out of the water. Severe hypothermia will set in within one hour, but without a life jacket, the victim is likely to drown before that occurs.
Cold Water Kills
The Coast Guard and water safety experts say public education and preparedness may help prevent cold water drowning deaths. In addition to understanding the physiological effects of cold water, people need to be aware that the initial shock of entering the cold water can cause panic and gasping resulting in a person inhaling large mounts of water.
"Cold water is a very unforgiving environment," said Chief Warrant Officer Phil Robinson, officer in charge of Coast Guard Station Calumet Harbor. "People need to know the dangers, know their limits, and be ready to take quick action in the case of an emergency.
The Coast Guard’s 9th District, which includes Chicago and the surrounding Lake Michigan regions, has 39 stations, two air stations, and ten cutters designated, trained and equipped for ice rescue operations.
"The Coast Guard and our partner agencies stand prepared and ready to help those in distress this winter, but it is the general public who take to the cold water or ice that needs to be the most prepared," said Mike Baron, the recreational boating safety specialist for the 9th District."
The public is advised to call 911 to report a person who has fallen through the ice or who is in distress in icy waters.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
29,617 Posts
Thanks for sharing. If not for that cutter, that guy would not be with us today. Hats off to the coastguard!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
466 Posts
Imagine the odds of them just bumping into that guy. Fate ah?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,516 Posts
Last year the guys on my ship said there were cross country skiers attempting to cross the brash ice left behind the ship.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I just seen this story on FNC so it looks like the national media picked up the story. He was supposedly 16 miles from the nearest point of land.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,130 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Ya....he had a backpack on him. I wonder if he spent the night on the ice? 16 miles is a long ice walk.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top