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Nursing home residents were sent back to their nursing home on discharge ONLY if their nursing home had a dedicated covid isolation unit.

If the nursing home did not have a dedicated covid isolation unit they were not sent back.

The Novi facility was not set up or staffed for people needing 24/7 assisted living.

I’m saying it could have been on an emergency basis.

Also, there were Covid patients put into nursing homes that were not residents prior to contracting Covid.
 

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I find it hard to believe they could staff and make the necessary "baggage" and necessary equipment that COULD accommodate nursing home patients that needed to be isolated, somewhere else. (considering)

People in nursing homes were getting sick from the staff not each other. i mean I ain't sure, but my sisters experience has been an eye opener to me. Based on what happens/happened there, I am OK with the practice. It seems most logical too.

Remember this, we STILL don't have 1 full year of data to work from.
It likely started with staff, but once established no doubt it passed patient. To patient. Also, there were Covid patients put into homes that were not prior residents.

What I see as an outcome is massive changes to treatment of long term care patients.
 

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It likely started with staff, but once established no doubt it passed patient. To patient. Also, there were Covid patients put into homes that were not prior residents.

What I see as an outcome is massive changes to treatment of long term care patients.
Always someone knocking on deaths door at a nursing home. The data doesn't really exist to qualify a result yet to my knowledge, to say the impact was greater or not. At least no one is presenting any. Or'd I miss it?

I just have a small experience to go by. One or 2 patients held there isolated, DID NOT infect the entire complex. People died, like they do every so often.
 

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Some probably did. You can search it out if you don't believe me but I said "it will all be over but the crying" I said that because people will still be dying but if the media and politicians treat it differently the rest of the country will move on, like it's over, so to speak. We are seeing that shift now that the election is over. The cries have been magnified in the media and by the politicians, now it will be done silently just like every other non covid death.

They no longer need it for it's political value.
Seems to me that people dying and case rate is still all over the news,but i skip through OAN and Newsmax,so maybe they're focused on something else.
 

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So, if Michigan's numbers of infection and deaths keep getting better, and the Governor opens bars/restaurants back up for indoor dining in a couple weeks, who is going out to bars and restaurants with their friends, and relatives to get their Jones taken care of?

You know that she'll only open things back up if there are enough hospital beds for the expected surge of cases which will result, right? ;) And what follows surges in cases? Anyone? It's like a yo-yo with people's lives, and the economy. Who likes playing with this yo-yo?
 

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So, if Michigan's numbers of infection and deaths keep getting better, and the Governor opens bars/restaurants back up for indoor dining in a couple weeks, who is going out to bars and restaurants with their friends, and relatives to get their Jones taken care of?

You know that she'll only open things back up if there are enough hospital beds for the expected surge of cases which will result, right? ;) And what follows surges in cases? Anyone? It's like a yo-yo with people's lives, and the economy. Who likes playing with this yo-yo?
When this current ten and a half week pause started on November 18, we had 3772 COVID patients in our hospitals, and it’s down to 2200 now. That’s a hell of a lot of hysteresis if closing in on 4000 patients was the point where restaurants went from OK to not OK.

Hospitalizations dropped to below 400 when restaurants opened in June and we sure aren’t getting down to that in two weeks.
 

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Even those of us that have hung onto our jobs become in greater danger of losing them the longer this is going on, and that's true for me even though I'm a scientist in r&d approaching 20 patents...waitresses and bartender stop buying cars, bam I lose my contract. This economy is all connected guys!
 

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Discussion Starter #388
Must be my neighbors across the road from my business listened to what Petro said in a post yesterday. He said that the restaurants must adapt. With the announcement of the extension the bar- grille downtown put this up yesterday, nothing fancy but it fits the needs. They View attachment 631987 must have put word out on social media because when I left work there were a lot of vehicles on the street from their customers. Now the question I have if while you're waiting for a table are you allowed to wait inside the building and have a drink?
I took and posted this picture this morning in the copied post . I walked across the street just before leaving work and checked out the inside of the temporary enclosure. The absurdity of this order that allows outdoor dining but not indoors is beyond me. Looking at the layout inside dining with half of the tables and booths closed would be much safer than what I saw. Cold in there plus the pleasant smell of propane. It was nice to see the employees that I haven’t seen in nearly two months.
 

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Be sure to order the fish!
My wife is 25% injun. Her mom is half Cree and half French (First Nation). Comes in handy when north of the border.

But ordering fish...not so much. Freezer is full of gills, specks, perch, bass, eyes, pike, and even a couple packs of salmon (thanks to @Far Beyond Driven).

Maybe the Casino does red snapper or flounder? Maybe then. I do miss my Gulf fishing days.
 

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When this current ten and a half week pause started on November 18, we had 3772 COVID patients in our hospitals, and it’s down to 2200 now. That’s a hell of a lot of hysteresis if closing in on 4000 patients was the point where restaurants went from OK to not OK.

Hospitalizations dropped to below 400 when restaurants opened in June and we sure aren’t getting down to that in two weeks.
Piketroller, did you happen to print out our county weekly Health Department releases. The site is not the easiest to backtrack. I was trying to find the one that the H.D. put out that 20 (?) of our deaths were from out of county patents moved into the downriver nursing home from the other densely populated counties? That would put down the FAKE information about what the queen did condemning old people to death.
 

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Piketroller, did you happen to print out our county weekly Health Department releases. The site is not the easiest to backtrack. I was trying to find the one that the H.D. put out that 20 (?) of our deaths were from out of county patents moved into the downriver nursing home from the other densely populated counties? That would put down the FAKE information about what the queen did condemning old people to death.
Here’s where all the press releases are published: http://www.stclaircounty.org/Offices/health/PressReleases.aspx
 

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My wife is 25% injun. Her mom is half Cree and half French (First Nation). Comes in handy when north of the border.

But ordering fish...not so much. Freezer is full of gills, specks, perch, bass, eyes, pike, and even a couple packs of salmon (thanks to @Far Beyond Driven).

Maybe the Casino does red snapper or flounder? Maybe then. I do miss my Gulf fishing days.
According to the level of ranting in the Cold Water section, shouldn't you expect to get a plate piled high with those greasy Lake Trout? Why else would they be planting millions of those nasty little fish in the great lakes instead of the silver varieties the complainers demand.
 

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Ya know, if bars, and restaurants really wanted to be able to stay open for indoor service for any length of time, wouldn't they install a significant amount of air-circulation equipment to reduce the risk of spreading covid? Investing in some large fans to just move indoor air around, so the virus is less transmittable, would be fairly cheap, and somewhat effective thing to do. Along with the other safety protocols for mask wearing, socially distancing, sanitizing, etc.

Did anyone who visited lots of restaurants notice this being done when the restrictions were lifted? Did the establishments seem interested in protecting their employees, and patrons in any significant ways that stood out?
 

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Ya know, if bars, and restaurants really wanted to be able to stay open for indoor service for any length of time, wouldn't they install a significant amount of air-circulation equipment to reduce the risk of spreading covid? Investing in some large fans to just move indoor air around, so the virus is less transmittable, would be fairly cheap, and somewhat effective thing to do. Along with the other safety protocols for mask wearing, socially distancing, sanitizing, etc.

Did anyone who visited lots of restaurants notice this being done when the restrictions were lifted? Did the establishments seem interested in protecting their employees, and patrons in any significant ways that stood out?
Air exchange was no part of regulations shutting them down.
Air make up systems and air balance are no new thing , their pretty inherent.
Most restaurants have a lot of air leaving from fryers,broilers,grill ect. . That means make up air has to enter the system in exchange.
Smoke eaters used to be employed , pre-smoking ban. Not sure the effect on a virus though.

Costs are going to come with any attempts at air treatment and sanitation.
Restaurant equipment is not cheap to start with. Codes require lots of stainless ect..
A restaurant with any age to it likely has plenty of updates the owner/company would like.
And in my experience , just keeping up with maintaining existing structure and systems is a matter of spending money with no return on it.
An example is grease in hoods and stacks. Gotta keep them clean or risk fire.
So you pay a business to clean them. How often?

A place I trained a replacement I cautioned about keeping a hood clean caught fire.
Guess what he answered when I asked about hood cleaning??
And if you look , you'll see grease stains on some roofs.
Do the folks running the place not know about it? Or is it a cost deal?
Now ask them to drop a few grand or more on a better H.V.A.C. air exchange system with a faster air turn over ,wit an anti bacterial device in it. Plus the cost of maintaining it.
The amount of vacuum to pull aerosol spray from a patrons sneeze would need to be pretty strong. And near the patron.
Yes , decent ventilation is a good thing.
Treating incoming air (unless air is recycled) won't change much.
Treating outgoing air only protects where that air goes after.
That leaves air already in the building to focus virus concern on.
Where in it's movement would we treat it? Air is coming in and leaving.
Increasing turn over rate increases speed of air movement.
Are we then dragging air from one table across another or more?
 

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I worked in hospitality, and ran restaurants, for years. I understand exactly what equipment they need, and typically have, and can get. I ran a fine dining establishment for a (former) relative of a prominent site member, here. lol

I asked if anyone noticed bars, or restaurants making an effort to install additional simple equipment to move air around inside the establishment, to reduce the risk of covid transmission indoors. It was a simple question; for a reason.
 

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I worked in hospitality, and ran restaurants, for years. I understand exactly what equipment they need, and typically have, and can get. I ran a fine dining establishment for a (former) relative of a prominent site member, here. lol

I asked if anyone noticed bars, or restaurants making an effort to install additional simple equipment to move air around inside the establishment, to reduce the risk of covid transmission indoors. It was a simple question; for a reason.
The restaurants I've been noting are treading water as far as having mad money to toss around. So no in answer to your question.
You want them to run a rug drying fan or something?

How will moving the air around reduce transmission of a virus? It's still a virus. Just more mobile with a forced air vehicle to move it more.
Please use your exact knowledge of the hospitality industry to reply explaining what exact equipment and costs per square foot are to reduce or eliminate virus. And toss in an amortization of cost recovery.
 

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Hey, Waif. Covid has been around, and a main topic of interest, for just about a year. Please read up on it, and how it is transmitted - mostly through aerosol droplets expelled when people speak, and breathe. You should learn about this. Circulating indoor air more is effective at reducing transmission of it. Really, you should learn about this.

I didn't ask restaurants having mad money. I asked if they had invested in additional air circulation equipment to reduce the risk to their employees, and patrons from covid. Very simple question.

I can find floor and pedestal fans that move large amounts of air @ Home Depot, Lowes, and Menards for under $200. I guess the number of fans needed to circulate air would depend on how large a room is - but any amount of additional air circulation is better.

What are bars, and restaurants doing, proactively, to protect their future? Trust me, some of them have taken action, and are reaping rewards.
 
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