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I try and hunt as much as I can all year long be it, woodchucks, deer, small game, what not.
I got married the begining of 09. My wife has 2 kids from her first marrage(5 & 8 years old). I love them like they are my own and treat them as they are mine.

I took my younger one out ground hog hunting one day. He loved it but didnt last long walking around so we called it a day but was still a great day. Later he said it was kinda boring because we didnt shoot anything but I was very happy to have him in the field with me. Also I dont think it was too boring he still tells all his friends he has gone hunting with his stepdad.

My question is how do you deal with kids when it comes to actually shooting something in the field?
I thought them seeing me shoot something small might not be as bad as something larger such as a deer. I guess I dont want to scare them about hunting for good. If they dont want to take it up thats fine with me but I dont want to scare them out of it also.
Do I just keep taking them out and then when it comes time for me to shoot something just shoot it and see what happens or what?

When I did take my little one out I made him wear earmuffs (guns not that loud but want to be safe and not sorry) and told him he could look away when I shoot if he wanted but never got the shot so not sure if he would or no.
 

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My oldest is 8. I take her in a heated rifle blind with 4 walls and a big window with a see through curtain. Then she can bring her Nintendo DS as long as she uses ear phones. Then we sit and she will fade in and out of playing the DS and watching the food plot. When I take her I do bring a weapon but I really don't plan on shooting anything--but that's just me.
 

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My boys are 10 and 6, they have both been small game and deer hunting with me since they were 4, they have tracked deer, watched me gut, and cut them up, clean pheasants, squirrels, and rabbits, along with lots of fish, they love it and are actually very interested in all
of the innerds.
 

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in my experience, kids like it more when there is a harvest of some sort. each kid is differnent and if he is asking you to shoot, i would. good luck
 

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I have 3 kids ages 3,5 and 6 all of them have been out with me this year bow hunting out of the double bull ground blind. It takes alot of patience but the looks on there faces is very rewarding. I shot a doe last week and my 6 yr old daughter help track and cut up deer she thought it was great. The best part she said was taking the deers coat off:)
 

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In my experience, with kids (no matter what the subject) it is all how it is presented. What I mean by that is that IF one makes a big deal about shooting an animal -- negatively -- then, the kid will perceive it to be a negative event. IF, however, that very same person (and, very same kid) presents things in a POSITIVE light.....the, the kid will walk away thinking nothing but GOOD.

Exposure is the name of the game.

Just like with sports, music, friends, school work, etc. -- the more you expose your kids to.....and, the way it is presented.....will go along way towards their positive perception.

Relax - have fun with your kids & shoot something with them & then be excited after the shot. They will be excited right along with ya!!
 

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had the same deal. ive got 3 daughters 9,7, and 3months. oldest 2 are from my wifes first marriage . when we got married it was the first time they had lived with someone who hunted. last yr the oldest started asking if she could go with me so i took her squrriel hunting and she loved it. this yr was here first yr bow hunting with me. so we hung double sets and she just came up in the trees with( she thought that was very cool) no deer first night and bored. second night though new spot and 2 bucks at 15, and 30 come out right in front of her. didnt shot either but she loved it. middle one get bored hunting but like to eat it and help skin it. and the 3 month old doesnt have a choice. weve got an off road stroller so she comes squirrel hunting with( yes i walk away from the stroller before i shot). they do love to ask if ill shot everything that moves but I only had to explain to them once that if ya kill youve got to skin it and tan it, or eat it. guess all gods little critters dont look that tasty after all. just take them out shooting. mine love it, specially the 22 and 45
 

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My son has been our several times as a youngster. Boredom sets in quickly. We usually end up with jacknife safety lessons, whittling sticks, and the like.

The transition from puting the knives away and safely picking up gun for a shot guarantees that the squirrel will be long gone from view.

Boredom is usually solved by a couple clay pigeons or a target set up to give him a chance to "plink" away.

I agree with the ear plugs/muffs...disagree with the nintendo in the woods. Either way - do what it takes to get the kids out with you
 

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In my experience, with kids (no matter what the subject) it is all how it is presented. What I mean by that is that IF one makes a big deal about shooting an animal -- negatively -- then, the kid will perceive it to be a negative event. IF, however, that very same person (and, very same kid) presents things in a POSITIVE light.....the, the kid will walk away thinking nothing but GOOD.

Exposure is the name of the game
Very good point.

To the OP wondering about how the kids will handle seeing something killed, how do they react to wildlife programs where animals kill other animals? Perhaps this would be a good building point for figuring out what may or may not be acceptable for their perception at this time? Presuming that they can see a pack of lions chase down and eat a zebra, they should be able to understand how an explanation of hunter ethics and how hunters try to kill animals as humanely as possible in order to have them later for dinner.
My son has been our several times as a youngster. Boredom sets in quickly. We usually end up with jacknife safety lessons, whittling sticks, and the like.
I agree. Always take the opportunity to make a learning experience out of being outdoors. When I first started taking my youngest sister hunting at the age of 4 for woodchucks, we also took time to investigate the types of plants in the cattle pastures, various animal sign we'd find, etc. Some days we never even saw a woodchuck, much less shot, but it was always a great time and left something to tell others about our adventure.
 
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