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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hunters must take baiting ban seriously

BY ERIC SHARP • FREE PRESS OUTDOORS WRITER • August 28, 2008




If you care about deer hunting, you will heed the Department of Natural Resources' ban on baiting in the Lower Peninsula following the recent discovery of chronic wasting disease at a captive deer facility in Kent County.
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If you're one of the slugs who have ignored other baiting restrictions, including the ban in counties where deer were found to be infected with bovine tuberculosis, we only can hope that you are among those tagged by conservation officers during this fall's stepped-up enforcement of the ban.

The DNR is doing its part with vastly increased testing of wild deer and increased enforcement following director Rebecca Humphries' announcement of an immediate ban on all baiting and feeding of deer in the Lower Peninsula.

Now the Legislature needs to accept responsibility and boost the present baiting ban penalty from a $100 fine to the same amount as for poaching deer, $1,000 or more. And that fine should be accompanied by a forfeiture of the hunter's bow or gun and loss of hunting privileges for at least three years.

Chronic wasting disease is caused by a prion, the same kind of weird, mutated protein that causes mad cow disease. Fortunately, the evidence is clear that unlike mad cow, CWD can't make the cross-species jump from cervids (deer, elk and moose) to other mammals, including humans. At least not yet.

Hunters in western states have eaten CWD-infected deer for 35 years that we know of, and there has been no increase in the cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, the form in which mad cow presents in humans.

However, CWD is 100% fatal in deer, and biologists are worried that it will become widespread in our deer herd, especially in southern Michigan, where deer sometimes seem as ubiquitous as squirrels. They also worry that it may mutate into a form that could infect people.

The infected deer in Kent County was a 3-year-old doe that was born at that facility. That means that the disease had to come from another captive cervid operation that sold or traded deer. Because of that, the DNR quarantined all of Michigan's 580 licensed captive cervid facilities until further notice.

CWD was first identified in a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service deer research center. The scientists saw that some deer appeared dazed and addled, drooled constantly, lost weight and showed no fear of humans or other predators. We know now that only 3% of the deer with CWD had reached that obvious stage. They can be sick without showing symptoms.

But that's true of other animal diseases, and, incredibly, those federal scientists let most of their deer loose into the wild and sold others to zoos before closing their facility, ensuring that the mysterious and then-unnamed malady would spread.

CWD was confined to the eastern mountain slopes of Colorado and Wyoming until the 1990s, when it was discovered in Nebraska, Alberta, Saskatchewan and other places so widespread that there was no way that deer could have carried it there on the hoof.

The probability that shipments of live animals between deer ranches were causing the spread was reinforced dramatically about five years ago when it turned up in Wisconsin, 900 miles from the nearest known place of infection. And while CWD was first seen in wild deer in Wisconsin, the DNR there soon found that it was established in deer in a captive breeding facility at the center of the infected area.

CWD will be very difficult to eradicate if it is found outside the fences of a captive deer facility in Michigan, because it can persist in the environment for years. When federal scientists reintroduced deer into an infected area from which all deer had been excluded for three years, the animals contracted CWD.

Deer became infected even when they were put back in an infected area where the ground had been burned off at a temperature of 700 degrees. And while CWD spread slowly in the western states, that's probably because their deer herd densities are a tenth of what is common in Michigan.

If you're a real hunter, you must take an active role in trying to stop this disease. The bovine TB mess should be an example of what can go wrong if we ignore the problem.

If you know someone is baiting illegally, turn him in. Call a CO and make it clear that you don't appreciate fools who put hunting at risk, and that you want the law enforced. If you follow the law, why shouldn't the other guy?

Contact ERIC SHARP at 313-222-2511 or [email protected].
 

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[Quote
"The infected deer in Kent County was a 3-year-old doe that was born at that facility. That means that the disease had to come from another captive cervid operation that sold or traded deer."
...................
Not sure if this is correct.... I thought the disease could also have from tainted feed.
.....................

"But that's true of other animal diseases, and, incredibly, those federal scientists let most of their deer loose into the wild and sold others to zoos before closing their facility, ensuring that the mysterious and then-unnamed malady would spread."
............
Never knew that, that is unbelievable.
............
[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the article
 

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Boy it's going to be a busy season for the CO's, you know darn well that as long as they sell bait at every corner there will be people using it, I hope everyone has the RAP hotline number because your going to need it to report violators, guaranteed.
 

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thanks for the article, it really brings things into perspective. This is a terrible thing for the deer herd, and who knows what effects it could be for humans. At this point, it appears that it doesn't hurt humans, or at least that my understanding, but who's to say that those people who eat a lot of venison wouldn't be affected?

Hopefully they can find some way to eradicate it, but the difficulty factor is astronimically high, I would suspect.

As the article said, if you see baiting going on, turn em in, its the only way to stop this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
We are the CO's eyes and ears in the field, they rely on our reporting of violations to help with the enforcement of the law. I for one am not afraid to report any violation I happen to see, be it on private or public land. If we are not part of the solution we are the problem.
 

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[Quote
"The infected deer in Kent County was a 3-year-old doe that was born at that facility. That means that the disease had to come from another captive cervid operation that sold or traded deer."
...................
Not sure if this is correct.... I thought the disease could also have from tainted feed.
.....................

"But that's true of other animal diseases, and, incredibly, those federal scientists let most of their deer loose into the wild and sold others to zoos before closing their facility, ensuring that the mysterious and then-unnamed malady would spread."
............
Never knew that, that is unbelievable.
............
Thanks for the article[/QUOTE]



Oral transmission and early lymphoid tropism of chronic wasting disease PrPres in mule deer fawns (Odocoileus hemionus ) Christina J. Sigurdson1, Elizabeth S. Williams2, Michael W. Miller3, Terry R. Spraker1,4, Katherine I. O'Rourke5 and Edward A. Hoover1

Mule deer fawns (Odocoileus hemionus) were inoculated orally with a brain homogenate prepared from mule deer with naturally occurring chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion-induced transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. Fawns were necropsied and examined for PrP res, the abnormal prion protein isoform, at 10, 42, 53, 77, 78 and 80 days post-inoculation (p.i.) using an immunohistochemistry assay modified to enhance sensitivity. PrPres was detected in alimentary-tract-associated lymphoid tissues (one or more of the following: retropharyngeal lymph node, tonsil, Peyer's patch and ileocaecal lymph node) as early as 42 days p.i. and in all fawns examined thereafter (53 to 80 days p.i.). No PrPres staining was detected in lymphoid tissue of three control fawns receiving a control brain inoculum, nor was PrPres detectable in neural tissue of any fawn. PrPres-specific staining was markedly enhanced by sequential tissue treatment with formic acid, proteinase K and hydrated autoclaving prior to immunohistochemical staining with monoclonal antibody F89/160.1.5. These results indicate that CWD PrP res can be detected in lymphoid tissues draining the alimentary tract within a few weeks after oral exposure to infectious prions and may reflect the initial pathway of CWD infection in deer. The rapid infection of deer fawns following exposure by the most plausible natural route is consistent with the efficient horizontal transmission of CWD in nature and enables accelerated studies of transmission and pathogenesis in the native species.

snip...

These results indicate that mule deer fawns develop detectable PrP res after oral exposure to an inoculum containing CWD prions. In the earliest post-exposure period, CWD PrPres was traced to the lymphoid tissues draining the oral and intestinal mucosa (i.e. the retropharyngeal lymph nodes, tonsil, ileal Peyer's patches and ileocaecal lymph nodes), which probably received the highest initial exposure to the inoculum. Hadlow et al. (1982) demonstrated scrapie agent in the tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, ileum and spleen in a 10-month-old naturally infected lamb by mouse bioassay. Eight of nine sheep had infectivity in the retropharyngeal lymph node. He concluded that the tissue distribution suggested primary infection via the gastrointestinal tract. The tissue distribution of PrPres in the early stages of infection in the fawns is strikingly similar to that seen in naturally infected sheep with scrapie. These findings support oral exposure as a natural route of CWD infection in deer and support oral inoculation as a reasonable exposure route for experimental studies of CWD.

snip...

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/full/80/10/2757

Subject: MAD DEER/ELK DISEASE AND POTENTIAL SOURCES Date: Sat, 25 May 2002 18:41:46 -0700 From: "Terry S. Singeltary Sr." Reply-To: BSE-L To: BSE-L

8420-20.5% Antler Developer For Deer and Game in the wild Guaranteed Analysis Ingredients / Products Feeding Directions

snip...

_animal protein_

http://www.surefed.com/deer.htm

BODE'S GAME FEED SUPPLEMENT #400 A RATION FOR DEER NET WEIGHT 50 POUNDS 22.6 KG.

snip...

_animal protein_

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod7.htm

Ingredients

__Animal Protein Products__,

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod6.htm

===================================

MORE ANIMAL PROTEIN PRODUCTS FOR DEER

Bode's #1 Game Pellets A RATION FOR DEER F3153

GUARANTEED ANALYSIS Crude Protein (Min) 16% Crude Fat (Min) 2.0% Crude Fiber (Max) 19% Calcium (Ca) (Min) 1.25% Calcium (Ca) (Max) 1.75% Phosphorus (P) (Min) 1.0% Salt (Min) .30% Salt (Max) .70%

Ingredients

__Animal Protein Products__,

FEEDING DIRECTIONS Feed as Creep Feed with Normal Diet

http://www.bodefeed.com/prod8.htm

INGREDIENTS

__Animal Protein Products__,

DIRECTIONS FOR USE

Deer Builder Pellets is designed to be fed to deer under range conditions or deer that require higher levels of protein. Feed to deer during gestation, fawning, lactation, antler growth and pre-rut, all phases which require a higher level of nutrition. Provide adequate amounts of good quality roughage and fresh water at all times.

http://www.profilenutrition.com/Products/Specialty/deer_builder_pellets.html

===================================================

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & HUMAN SERVICES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION

April 9, 2001 WARNING LETTER

01-PHI-12 CERTIFIED MAIL RETURN RECEIPT REQUESTED

Brian J. Raymond, Owner Sandy Lake Mills 26 Mill Street P.O. Box 117 Sandy Lake, PA 16145 PHILADELPHIA DISTRICT

Tel: 215-597-4390

Dear Mr. Raymond:

Food and Drug Administration Investigator Gregory E. Beichner conducted an inspection of your animal feed manufacturing operation, located in Sandy Lake, Pennsylvania, on March 23, 2001, and determined that your firm manufactures animal feeds including feeds containing prohibited materials. The inspection found significant deviations from the requirements set forth in Title 21, code of Federal Regulations, part 589.2000 - Animal Proteins Prohibited in Ruminant Feed. The regulation is intended to prevent the establishment and amplification of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) . Such deviations cause products being manufactured at this facility to be misbranded within the meaning of Section 403(f), of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act).

Our investigation found failure to label your swine feed with the required cautionary statement "Do Not Feed to cattle or other Ruminants" The FDA suggests that the statement be distinguished by different type-size or color or other means of highlighting the statement so that it is easily noticed by a purchaser.

In addition, we note that you are using approximately 140 pounds of cracked corn to flush your mixer used in the manufacture of animal feeds containing prohibited material. This flushed material is fed to wild game including deer, a ruminant animal. Feed material which may potentially contain prohibited material should not be fed to ruminant animals which may become part of the food chain.

The above is not intended to be an all-inclusive list of deviations from the regulations. As a manufacturer of materials intended for animal feed use, you are responsible for assuring that your overall operation and the products you manufacture and distribute are in compliance with the law. We have enclosed a copy of FDA's Small Entity Compliance Guide to assist you with complying with the regulation... blah, blah, blah...

http://www.fda.gov/foi/warning_letters/g1115d.pdf

http://madcowfeed.blogspot.com/2008/07/docket-03d-0186-fda-issues-draft.html



see full text ;


Thursday, August 28, 2008
cwd, feeding, and baiting piles

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-feeding-and-baiting-piles.html
 

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As always, thanks Terry for providing science to this and many other discussions. If I were to put down money today on the most likely cause of that deer in the pen near Grand Rapids getting CWD, I know where I would be placing my money.

L & O
 

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I think that in order to help enforce the no baiting ban, that they should also ban all the 'roadside sales' of said 'bait'. If its not there and easy to purchase, it should help discourage those from buying it.
 

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That would make sense wouldn't it?
 

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I think that in order to help enforce the no baiting ban, that they should also ban all the 'roadside sales' of said 'bait'. If its not there and easy to purchase, it should help discourage those from buying it.
+1 on that,
Kinda like having a Beer vending machine outside a High School...........
 

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sully
slodrift
wyldkat, Maybe I'm not getting this picture in focus, are you guys suggesting that because of what Terry wrote ? Did you see the part about animal protein ?

L & O
 

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transmission....is a much more likely route than transmission from animal protein containing feeds for cervids. Though that is a route that can cause BSE or mad cow in cattle as Terry points out. Deer to deer direct contact transmission, or transmission via contaminated feed sources or environment, or deer chewing on infected deer viscera or carcasses (which is the suspected cause if the New York case source of infection) is much more likely. That is why trace-out and trace-in investigations are taking place to see what deer were brought in and out of the index facility. Most facilities that have found posititive deer or elk that keep records can track back to animals that came from a source that had positive cervids. In some cases like Montana. A ranch there was not known to be positive until it was traced back to from a positive facility in another state and was then tested.

Also,

"But that's true of other animal diseases, and, incredibly, those federal scientists let most of their deer loose into the wild and sold others to zoos before closing their facility, ensuring that the mysterious and then-unnamed malady would spread."

At the time, this disease had an unknown cause, this was before Beth Williams, a grad student at the time, discovered the abnormal prion protein that caused the spongeform change in the brain stem and the beta- folding of the protein. Then it was already too late. But her discovery was a great one, because it allowed the rest of the scientific community to actually have a place to start, and actually figure out not only what they were working with but how to test for it, and how it was being transmitted.

My apologies for any spelling for gramatical errors, I'm exhausted, but felt the urge to post. More from CWD central later.
Kristie
Wildlife Disease Lab.
MDNR
 

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transmission....is a much more likely route than transmission from animal protein containing feeds for cervids. Though that is a route that can cause BSE or mad cow in cattle as Terry points out. Deer to deer direct contact transmission, or transmission via contaminated feed sources or environment, or deer chewing on infected deer viscera or carcasses (which is the suspected cause if the New York case source of infection) is much more likely. That is why trace-out and trace-in investigations are taking place to see what deer were brought in and out of the index facility. Most facilities that have found posititive deer or elk that keep records can track back to animals that came from a source that had positive cervids. In some cases like Montana. A ranch there was not known to be positive until it was traced back to from a positive facility in another state and was then tested.

Also,

"But that's true of other animal diseases, and, incredibly, those federal scientists let most of their deer loose into the wild and sold others to zoos before closing their facility, ensuring that the mysterious and then-unnamed malady would spread."

At the time, this disease had an unknown cause, this was before Beth Williams, a grad student at the time, discovered the abnormal prion protein that caused the spongeform change in the brain stem and the beta- folding of the protein. Then it was already too late. But her discovery was a great one, because it allowed the rest of the scientific community to actually have a place to start, and actually figure out not only what they were working with but how to test for it, and how it was being transmitted.

My apologies for any spelling for gramatical errors, I'm exhausted, but felt the urge to post. More from CWD central later.
Kristie
Wildlife Disease Lab.
MDNR

Thanks again for that info. Kristie, I'm sure everyone appreciates all the testing you have been doing..............

Good luck......

Dan
 

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L&O, it seems to me there are a lot of un-answered questions yet and as long as they have a ban on baiting it seems to me it would remove a lot of temptation if it wasn't sold on every corner.
 

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Ok, lets Over react, I've been going out to WY on and off for more than 15 years and their DNR is very calm about CWD known it exists and and monitors it. They dont go around like chickens with their heads cut off. The state wide ban is, as expected from our DNR an uneducated over reaction. What a bunch of bozo's. Why didnt they close down baiting in the UP when WI found CWD in their hurd. Dont forget the seat belt law, what did they say, "Oh well never write a ticket for not having your seat belt on" right. IT's all a bunch of BS. from a bunch of politicians.

Lets pass a law that says for every new law two others have to come off the books. Is this what our founding fathers had in mind. or is this what they fought against. Think it over you know I am write.
 

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Do they bait deer and elk out in WY?, not being sarcastic just asking.
 

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transmission....is a much more likely route than transmission from animal protein containing feeds for cervids. Though that is a route that can cause BSE or mad cow in cattle as Terry points out. Deer to deer direct contact transmission, or transmission via contaminated feed sources or environment, or deer chewing on infected deer viscera or carcasses (which is the suspected cause if the New York case source of infection) is much more likely. That is why trace-out and trace-in investigations are taking place to see what deer were brought in and out of the index facility. Most facilities that have found posititive deer or elk that keep records can track back to animals that came from a source that had positive cervids. In some cases like Montana. A ranch there was not known to be positive until it was traced back to from a positive facility in another state and was then tested.

Also,

"But that's true of other animal diseases, and, incredibly, those federal scientists let most of their deer loose into the wild and sold others to zoos before closing their facility, ensuring that the mysterious and then-unnamed malady would spread."

At the time, this disease had an unknown cause, this was before Beth Williams, a grad student at the time, discovered the abnormal prion protein that caused the spongeform change in the brain stem and the beta- folding of the protein. Then it was already too late. But her discovery was a great one, because it allowed the rest of the scientific community to actually have a place to start, and actually figure out not only what they were working with but how to test for it, and how it was being transmitted.

My apologies for any spelling for gramatical errors, I'm exhausted, but felt the urge to post. More from CWD central later.
Kristie
Wildlife Disease Lab.
MDNR
Kristie,, would you be able to comment on whether or not "we/State of MI" have been in contact with other states, i.e WI, Western states that have already been through this and could maybe give us some advice or gameplan as to what should be done. Or are we just gonna "wing it" and make knee-jerk decisions until this whole thing spirals completely outta control?? My guess would be that we are in a unique situation because of our deer densities but I think we would have to be somewhat similar to WI,, right?? Any and all insight and info is appreciated.
 

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Not sure what you meant by 'wing it' & "knee jerk decisions". I believe the DNR is following their CWD plan which they developed a number of years ago. That doesn't seem like 'wingin it or knee jerk' which seem to imply an unthought out, spur of the moment decision. Maybe their plan isn't correct (time will tell), but I bet they thought it out well in advance.
 

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Not sure what you meant by 'wing it' & "knee jerk decisions". I believe the DNR is following their CWD plan which they developed a number of years ago. That doesn't seem like 'wingin it or knee jerk' which seem to imply an unthought out, spur of the moment decision. Maybe their plan isn't correct (time will tell), but I bet they thought it out well in advance.
You'd think wouldn't ya....:lol: Let's face it,,, the State of MI's track record for decision making on anything,, is well,, let's just say "less than stellar".

To answer your question though,, what I meant was,, the whole bait-ban on the LP. Read though what WI has been through and what has happened there and what they did. WI is the closest variable we have to the same situation.
 
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