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Say My Name.
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After 15 years of plotting, I feel I have a very easy way. I always have some perennial clover(actually crimson clover which is an annual but reseeds itself every year) available but other than that don't feel the need to put the time and expense into summer plots as there is so much available to them.
As for fall plots, I have pared it down to brassicas(which are on a short leash of being disregarded) and grain plots. All plots are no tilled. My equipment includes a quad sprayer, a broadcast spreader, and a drag. I spray my plots 3 times throughout the summer, broadcast triple 19 and brassicas on August 1st, broadcast triple 19 and my wheat rye and oats grain mix on September 1st and run over it with a drag. I follow up by over seeding in mid September with more grains.
This has worked so well and takes so little time and expense I sold my disc. I do about 3 acres(mostly micro plots) in less than a day and costs around $250 for the year. Can't get any easier than that.
So much here to discuss.

Great and enviable philosophy - I'm all for accomplishing my objectives with a minimum of time and expense. This sounds like a very workable formula.

Stream of consciousness time:

Do you mow your clover?

Though I always have clover in my rotation, it remains a very viable deer draw throughout the hunting seasons through January 1. I have found the ladinos and, especially, alice white to be highly preferred in the late season. I've grown crimson clover a few times and found it well consumed by deer. However, when mixed with the whites, I've found it gets outcompeted and diminishes in time on my dirt.

After well over a decade of planting every variety of rape and turnip known to man, I pared my brassicas down to zero a few years ago. Though they weren't expensive in time or money to grow, deer use of this stuff was so negligible that it simply wasn't worth it. I understand that in some places that deer may take some time to develop a taste for brassicas; at my farm, I'm convinced that could mean something like 50 to 60 years, and I'm not that patient.

Cereal grains are wonderful and I grow them every year. A solid draw in my area, and they have the advantage (at least so far as wheat and rye are concerned) of providing an excellent food source for hungry deer during spring greenup. And they are particularly dynamite if you get a good thaw in December after an extended cold spell. Of the three, my favorite is wheat.

I like your comment about planting grains on September 1. My target is Labor Day, though I've gone as late as 09/17 with very good results. Unless I'm planting with a mix of other stuff that require an earlier planting date, I will never again plant grains before September 1. I've found that when I do so, and get excellent growing conditions, the wheat/oats/rye gets too tall, too tough, and too stemmy, and the deer will pretty much ignore it.

Lower maintenance foodplotting is compelling. Not yet for me, though, as I like to plant soybeans every year. And I've been impressed with the results of combining them with sugar beets.
 

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Thanks Dan. To address your question, I don't mow my clover but that requires some explanation that relates very well and could be a whole other discussion of low maintenance food plotting, so let's discuss this process.
A few years ago, at the Dasch habitat day, Craig Harper and a group of guys (probably you were involved) after the event discussed the use of Crimson clover combined with wheat as a perpetual food plot. I believe he also suggested adding red clover to the mix but I have dropped that since then as I saw no benefit to it as it dies out and doesn't seem to ever come back.
Although crimson is an annual, I have found it to be a very good re-seeding clover if left to nature and not mowed before it flowers, in fact, I never mow it. Deer absolutely hammer crimson clover on both my farms.
Somebody could probably help with seeding rates as I have become pretty efficient with a bag spreader over the years and go by feel rather than pounds any more to establish these easy perpetual food plots.
The process starts after multiple sprayings through spring and summer to get a clean plot. On Sept 1, I spread wheat at a fairly light weight, drag the wheat in with some fertilizer, then over-seed with the crimson. This provides a highly attractive plot of clover and wheat combination that season and somehow the crimson lives through the winter and takes off, along with the wheat the next spring and they hammer it again at spring at green-up. This is when the beautiful red flowers of crimson appear and you will notice the wheat continue to grow also and go to seed which will aid in somewhat reseeding itself.(this period is why you don't want to go too heavy with the wheat as it could shade out the crimson). There is a period of time, as in right now, that after the crimson flowers out, it dies off, drops its seeds and all that is left is dead wheat stalks with seeds which the turkeys love. This is when you could go in there and spray for any weeds that may have grown. The dormant crimson seeds dropped will soon start growing again this season and start the process over. On Sept 1, I over-seed with another small amount of wheat and repeat the process each year.
I have had crimson plots for several years now that renew themselves. Some have become weedy as I don't always catch the optimum spraying time. If that happens, I nuke the whole plot and start it over.
Hope that makes some sense.
 

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I would like to provide a counter point to Farmlegend's wisdom. I have a whole different scenario when it comes to planting grains with clover. I have no problem planting grains in mid August due to my high deer density with no picky eaters. There are different ways to skin a cat (feral not domesticated) and many ways to cut the feet off of coyotes.

Here are some October grains with clover and alfalfa. I estimate they get 12 inches or more when planted Aug 11-15:







And here is later in the season:






I get fantastic clover plots the next season with the caveat that I have a good flail mower to mow the grains.
This was wheat because the rye store wasn't open the day I was planting:

 

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I agree with Stevenj on the mid August planting. I do the same. This allows me to plant brassicas and cereal grains/clover in the same weekend saving time for other projects.

I have found myself with leaning towards more clover plots than half clovers and half brassicas due to wanting to relieve myself of some of the work involved with habitat management.
Though I typically mow three or four times a year this year it will probably be only twice. If it works out well, that trend will continue.
I have tried the Crimson clover and wheat plot but didn't notice if it was a big draw.
That was two years ago and I still get a good amount of Crimson to return every year.

As much as I enjoy " playing farmer ", time and money are better spent doing other things and clover plots definitely are a great way to provide food for the deer with little effort.
 

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This is pretty much the road i am hoping to go down. I hope this year is my last year to plant buckwheat( end of a 3 year schedule). I have one clover and chicory plot that is doing spectacular on its second year. This fall I plan on planting rye and clover mixed with chicory and a light sprinkling of tillage raddish where all the buckwheat is. I hope to frost seed cave in rock SG where the EW is now. I do have some areas prepped for Ew for the next couple of years until the switch gets established. I may or may not provide small strips in the established clover for cereal grains and or brassicas, But the plan from the git go was perrenial plots. I guess i will have to see how things work out.
 
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