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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for a good pair of warm gloves to hunt in. Never have problem with cold feet always my hands. I Have a super warm pair of snowmobiling mittens, but it's hard to slide those bad boys off when it's time to shoot. What do you guys use out there?
 

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I go with the large muffs that attach to your mid-section. You can keep small mittens on and yet put your hands in them for extra warmth until you need to use them. You can also put a hand warmer in the middle of the muff to keep both hands toasty.
 

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Just like my feet, my hands sweet all the time. I use light weight gloves, no insulation in them. I may go through 3 pair on a given sit. I also use the disposable hand warmers up the ying yang.
 

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I open a couple pack's of the hand warmer's, slip 'em in my pocket's, then in go my hand's. My biggest problem are my feet, but there is another thread for that. Usually before hunting season being's, I stock up on the hand warmer's. I use them for hunting, ice fishing, and even steelheading during the colder month's. I have a hard time hunting with glove's on, but if need be, I will wear a pair of brown work glove's, along with a hand warmer in my pocket, and I am good to go!!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I think I'll try the hand muffler with hand warmers. I was looking for gloves just cause I like to be ready at all times. I think Meijer's has the best price on the hand warmers. When there asked if you can buy the whole box of warmers.
 

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I sit in sub zero weather every year and the majority of my sits are below 40 degrees for the entire year, maybe 30-40 sits with colder temps. I am never in the woods, even during the warm weather 50 and 60 degree days, without my muff. I have 2 muffs, one with windstopper material, the other without. I clip my range finder to it, and use it to carry my gloves, facemask, hat, grunt tube, etc. If it is really cold, say in the 20's or lower, I wear a heavy pair of gloves to walk into the stand in, then place those gloves inside my jacket next to my sides to keep them warm, as well as add extra warmth to myself. I then slip on only a thin pair of jersey-weight thermax or polypropolene type gloves. Those type of gloves are all I ever wear when hunting, even in below zero temps. If it's in the low 20's or colder for the entire sit, I will use up to 2 large heat packs to keep me comfortable. If it is raining or snowing hard, I will use a saddle-cloth gore-tex gator I bought specifically to wrap around the hand-muff. I have no idea why they havn't come out with a gore-tex insulated model, I even called Cabela's product development department and suggested it.

I've been hunting with a muff for 17 years now, ever since I made my own first one with several layers of wool and a large safety pin when I was 16. Bow, arrows, release, safety belt, hand muff. That's the order of importance I place on it as part of a mental check-off before I enter the woods, any time I hunt. Give me warm clothes, my mickey mouse boots, hand muff, neck warmer, knit facemask, and a gore-tex knit hat, and I've logged many hours of below 10 degrees weather.
 

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I use the flip-open mitts with a chemical heater pack in each mitt. The type I buy have 2-way tape so I stick them to the flip open part of the mitt.

I rarely have a problem using that system.
 

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Disposable hand warmers and a muff are the way to go. I also use poly pro gloves when it get cold and those reflective light weight gloves that radiate the warmth back to your hands when it's real cold in combo with the muff.

The large disposable hand warmers last all day when it's real cold out plus they give off more heat.
 

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Thinsulate, "space age material," rubber liners, mittens - I've tried 'em all. Despite all the high-tech fibers, what I've settled on are those cheap, cotton work gloves - those brown ones that shrink so much when you wash them. I always wear two pair at a time. Even with two pair I still have enough flexibility for bow or gun - something I didn't have with mittens or bulky gloves. In addition, I always carry at least three sets with me. The first set is usually wet from dew by the time I get to my stand so I switch to set #2. Set #3 is either stuffed inside my coat or is between my butt and the seat on my tree stand. Either way, this spare set keeps warm. When my hands get cold I switch with the spare, warm set. Of course, whenever possible I try to keep my hands tucked in my armpits or under the bottom of my coat to keep them warmer for at least a few more minutes. I think cold hands run in my family. Whatever I do I know my hands are going to get cold. I'm just trying to keep them from getting too cold to shoot the bow or gun. As simple as they are, the 79 cent cotton gloves are the best I've found. They're so cheap I probably have 10 or 15 pair. This enables me to go with a new set of (de-scented) gloves every time I go afield.

Good luck this year!
John E.
(..got a big doe last Sunday. Now the fun really starts - explore new areas, try new things, focus on BUCKS that are starting to get real frisky. Late October is my A #1 time to be in the woods/swamps. When it comes to huntin' I get more excited than a dog with two tails - I hope I never outgrow the child-like enthusiasm that hunting provides!)
 

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What I discovered last year was wearing a pair of latex gloves underneath my regular insulated gloves. It seemed to provied extra warmth, and if you shoot a deer you're all ready for field dressing!
 

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Hand muff works great for me. I wear a very thin set of gloves and then slip my hands into the muff. I have not used a hand warmer although I do hunt the late season. Maybe this year I will add one and see if I like it.

The one thing to remember is bring a think set of gloves I have some deer skin ones I like. Anyway wear them to and from the stand. if you climb down with the thin gloves on you will regret it. I did it last year and my hands froze from the metal of the tree stand. They were so cold I could not untie my string on the bow. I had to use my knife and cut it. I walked as fast and I could to warm up and unziped my coat and tucked my hands into my arm pits. I think I was close to serious frost bite.
 

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FIngerless gloves (similar to the jersey gloves) My muff I got at B.P.S. big thick and insulated. I also use charcoal hand warmer. I light one as I go to the stand.I stick it in my muff. I put one in each boot blanket(wool socks no boots in there. Insulated Bibs with a heavy insulated coat.

Like Jeff I have many a days out in the sub freezing temps and I'm just toasty.

I also have 6 of the charcoal handwarmers, using three at a time. I pull out the extras and light them as soon as I feel the ones I'm using dropping temp. I have to remember which one is my NUKE heater and remember to not put that one in the boot blankets.

But to answer your question when the temp drops use a muff and any type of heat pad/fuelstick/fuel heater and you should be just fine. It's nice to be in the habit of taking it every night with you so as the night falls you can see what a difference they make.
 

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Use a hand muff. Like NorthJeff, we made ours before they started manufacturing them for the masses. Light cotten gloves and the muff keep me warm through most days. I add a hand warmer to the muff when it's real cold and that's all I need.

Re. your comment: "I was looking for gloves just cause I like to be ready at all times. "

I have found that using a muff keep me even more ready than when using gloves. My hands slip EASILY out of the muff with very little movement and it's "game on" much easier. When I have my hands stuffed in my pockets there is a lot more movement getting my hands out and getting ready for the shot.
 

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I use "Glomitts" (flip top mittens with exposed fingertip gloves inside) with those disposable pocket warmers inside them.

Super toasty all day long and when you need them,... your exposed fingers for your trigger release or gun trigger. :D
 

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One of the things that many don't consider......

Any extra bulk on your hands and face will drastically change your point of impact. My fleece facemask is about 1" left at 20 yards, knit facemask about 3", 2 knit facemask around 6", add in some bulky mittens/gloves and you are even more.

Using the same thin gloves the entire season with a muff greatly reduces the number of variables that will effect the shot. Also, my fleece facemask is great down into the lower 20's, and can be worn with no hat, hat, fleece cap, neck warmer, or insulated gore-tex stocking cap to increase the warmth...all things that do no effect the point of impact. I mark my sight where to adjust to when adding the heavy knit masks for the cold weather-below 20 degrees.

Just remember, the further off your face your release hand is, the further left your arrow will hit, and opposite for a left hander.
 

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A muff and the Brown Jersey gloves in below 20 weather. i have a nice pair of gloves I bought at Bass Pro Shop for $40. i wear those on the ATV and sometimes keep the left one on, but the right hand is always the cotton jersey glove. They are really warm and allow for good circulation.

I am going to try something new this year that i noticed a couple of weeks ago when I forgot my thermouse. I poured coffee in a pepsi bottle and put that in my mit and the kept me warm(Oct. 6 and the morning temp was 20), so I will use that as my early morning coffee that way I do not have to pour into a cup.

A couple of years ago I just finished poursing some coffee and looked down and there he was. 2 yards away. I slow set down the cup trying to not make any noise, by the time I got my bow into position he was 10 yards away, i drew waited for him to turn a bit and blasted him.

But the damn coffee could have cost me, because I usually make at least on clinking noise putting it back in my pack. With a plastic bottle is should be a little quieter.
 
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