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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been trying to get some decent pics of my winter birds. Just too darn fluttery and skittish to get a decent picture off. What's the secret, telescope lens? ImageUploadedByOhub Campfire1387665864.611271.jpg
ImageUploadedByOhub Campfire1387665895.142171.jpg

I have a Carolina wren hanging around that is impossible to catch.


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I was waiting for one of the better photographers on here to answer this, but I'll give you some advice based on my limited knowledge of shooting birds (I usually do macro and landscapes).

High shutter speed. Patience. Long optical (as opposed to electronic) zoom. Patience. Camouflage. Patience. A steady rest. But you'll also probably need some patience. :lol: It seems every time I can spot one in the viewfinder, they're already moving on to somewhere else. When they do stay put for a moment, my shots are hasty and not as well-focused as I'd like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I have yet to get all camo'd up, but I can def. improve my patience.


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You don't have to go all-out with your camouflage. I prefer not to go for the "Great White Hunter" look when I'm out taking photos, but wearing earth tones helps give me a little bit of concealment in a pinch. As one would expect, birds tend to have great vision, so any little advantage helps.:)
 

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Good pictures are all about the light conditions and the camera you are using.

Always try and have the sun at your back. But as was stated above, your shutter speed will be key. Most new cameras have very fast shutters that minimize blur caused by slight camera movement or by subject movement.

What type of camera are you using now? Digital zoom creates terrible distortion. Make sure you're not using the digital zoom.

You can get a great quality point and shoot camera for about $100. Some of the best photos I have taken were with a base model Canon point and shoot.
 

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Use a tripod whenever possible and bracket your exposures.

Remember, when there is snow in the frame your camera's meter can be fooled. I always overexpose my initial shot by 1 stop in these situations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Its a Kodak. Quite a few years old. Digital zoom, 10MP. Sounds like I need to upgrade my camera.
 

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Push the shuuter a lot and keep the subject close and in great light.
 

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Push the shuuter a lot and keep the subject close and in great light.
Exactly that!
The beauty of digital cameras is basically zero cost vs buying film and then paying again to have the pictures developed only to be disappointed with the results.
Take hundreds of photos and maybe only keep a few. No wasted cost.
Also with a lot of digital cameras you may have a "burst" setting. This will capture 3 or 5 or whatever pictures in very a short moment. Going back through these will often reveal a great pic. Here is a pic I took with my silly cell phone. I took a bunch and kept only this one.
 

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Agreed. I use this method with some of the trickier subjects. Having a couple hundred shots definitely improves the odds of one of them being good.

BTW, aside from taking shots on the burst setting, you should try the bracket setting, as well, if your camera has one. It takes three shots, on different exposures, to give you some more options. This kind of setting is good for shots where you're going for depth-of-field, as it shows you the different lighting you can get to highlight your subject amidst trees and other cover.
 
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