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Thanks to Jake and Jim for the christmas present!
 

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Great video. Thanks for posting.

Do you have the same LONG term survivability with hinges during the summer as you do during the winter/pre bud break?
 

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What's the main difference between doe bedding and buck bedding? I'm guessing buck beds would be farther away from food.

That is correct (the proximity to food difference) and from what I've seen creating doe bedding is more along the lines of creating a "bedding area" whereas buck bedding is more like creating "a bed".

With doe beds you are looking to create and area where one or two doe groups could bed, with buck beds you are looking to make a spot for one bed where a buck can bed alone and watch those doe bedding area's.

I'm sure Bio has other notes as well but that's one thing that I see.
 

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That is correct (the proximity to food difference) and from what I've seen creating doe bedding is more along the lines of creating a "bedding area" whereas buck bedding is more like creating "a bed".

With doe beds you are looking to create and area where one or two doe groups could bed, with buck beds you are looking to make a spot for one bed where a buck can bed alone and watch those doe bedding area's.

I'm sure Bio has other notes as well but that's one thing that I see.
Ok thanks thats what I was thinking. I went in with the saw last weekend and made about ten more beds like the ones shown in the video. They look really good with thick cover, over head cover, escape routes. Only thing is its kind of muddy ground with roots right on the surface. I thought about bringing in buckets of sand but that's a lot of work as there is no sand on my property. Anybody put down bags of landscape mulch?
 

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Tornado Jim
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Ok thanks thats what I was thinking. I went in with the saw last weekend and made about ten more beds like the ones shown in the video. They look really good with thick cover, over head cover, escape routes. Only thing is its kind of muddy ground with roots right on the surface. I thought about bringing in buckets of sand but that's a lot of work as there is no sand on my property. Anybody put down bags of landscape mulch?
What mighty said. Doe families are very social and like to hang out together and watch each others backs. So we hinge cut a larger area maybe 10 yards in diameter or so, and then we rake out about 8-10 spots to accommodate our usual fall early winter family sized of 3-7 members. I make it a point to break up families when I see 7 members. It is a good indicator of population problems and I don't like to have groups around with 7 pairs of eyes. We make plenty of extra spots because we want to give them a choice. Just as there are more chairs than we can sit in at once in our living rooms, we want them to have more spots than they need.

Buck beds can literally take up the space a single buck can fit in. Often being only a yard in diameter or so. Bucks are loners even when they are in bachelor groups. We might put 3-5 "buck" beds in a spot to accommodate the bachelor group, but they each have their own bunk bed and do not sleep together just like guys in deer camp ;). Girls have slumber parties, guys sack out on their own.

Just because we call these bedding areas doe beds does not mean bucks won't bed in them. They do. When we call them buck and doe beds it means we are optimizing it for doe families or single bucks, but a doe may use a "buck" bed and bucks may use "doe" beds. But does are so seldom alone that single beds are mostly used by bucks.

Nor do we believe in the concept of a buck using a single bed. Bucks are up and down in their "safe" zone all day long and may change from one bed to another during the day and be in a completely different bedding area the next day.

Our goal is to have accommodations for lots of deer in discrete locations so that we know where they are at. If we make a five star hotel for them in the bedding sanctuary, they will not lie down in the 3 star hotel where they can observe our stand entry.
 

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Great video, thanks for sharing. Any tips on getting that very first tree to stay parallel to the ground at shoulder/head height? It appears that you build upon the first tree fallen (to keep the rest parallel to the ground). Thanks.
 

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Tornado Jim
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Great video, thanks for sharing. Any tips on getting that very first tree to stay parallel to the ground at shoulder/head height? It appears that you build upon the first tree fallen (to keep the rest parallel to the ground). Thanks.
The main thing is a slow fall. Big mistake is to cut until it falls on its own. You need to stop before the tree starts to release on its own, and then either take it over with a wedge if it is larger or with a hinge pole if it is smaller. This provides a thicker hinge with more holding wood to slow the fall and to help it held together when the top hits.

Having something in the way helps. It is a bit of an art but I try to use other trees to slow the fall. If you can brush it down through other trees it will fall slower. Or land it on heavy brush or a downed tree. Sometimes there is nothing like that to use so you have to go slowe. If you screw up, you can cut off the tree and lift it up onto the stump avter cutting a notch in it like we did in the video.

For bed making, try to stop while the tree is still held in place by the hinge. This one would have fallen backwards and pinched the saw if I went too far. You want to stop before the tree tries to move at all in any direction. Rule of thumb is to cut about 70% of the way through the tree. Eighty percent is too far.



Then force the tree to go over with a wedge or hinge tool, as slowly as possible.



This is a perfect hinge. Note that it is about 30% of the thickness of the tree. Having enough wood causes it to hold together and create a nice arc that helps keep the vascular system open. With a soft maple, cutting just a little too far will usually end up in a break-off. Going slow allows it to slowly tear, creating a small barber chair effect, which is really ideal, because it creates that arc instead of just a right angle pinch. Practice practice practice.

 

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Excellent picture and demonstration Jim. Seems learning form your examples with pictures is teaching us a great deal, Cant wait to buy your book.
 

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Your making Maple Syrup makers like me cringe...Lol

But I understand the effort. Thanks for the video and demonstration.

Sent from my SCH-R760 using Ohub Campfire mobile app
 

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This is one of the best "how to" threads that I've ever seen here in MS.......EVER!
 

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I would suggest that the mods make this a "sticky" in the habitat forum.
 

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Thanks Jim for the x-mas present (vid.) Jim! Pics and video make it much simpler. Can't wait for the book. Mark
 

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How does this look? I put a bunch of sand in the muddy beds along with a layer of canary grass. Nice and comfy now. I made about ten of theses. Some next to each other and some spaced apart. ImageUploadedByOhub Campfire1419791710.130464.jpg ImageUploadedByOhub Campfire1419791733.251442.jpg
 

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Your making Maple Syrup makers like me cringe...Lol

But I understand the effort. Thanks for the video and demonstration.

Sent from my SCH-R760 using Ohub Campfire mobile app
:lol: I know the feeling, Maple Ridge! Paul Knox (aka Dbltree) didn't much care for sugar maples either....and I too understand that. We are hobby sugar makers although we have enough sugar maples around that we could do it commercially. We manage our sugar bush on a ridge of about 5 acres near the house and barn so we still have 155 acres we can use for deer habitat...but it still hurts some to hinge cut perfectly good crop trees!
 
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