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How often do you sharpen the blades on your brush hog?

  • As soon as they need sharpening I sharpen them.

    Votes: 2 8.7%
  • If I hit a rock where I know they need it - I go ahead and sharpen them.

    Votes: 1 4.3%
  • Every year or two.

    Votes: 3 13.0%
  • Once every 5 years or so - whether they need sharpening or not.

    Votes: 9 39.1%
  • When I notice they are "shredding" the stuff and not cutting it.

    Votes: 8 34.8%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious if anybody else out there is as bad as I am about neglecting the blades on their brush hog (rotary mower)? I am terrible about it. Don't know why. I'm thinking I should add this to my spring maintenance schedule. It is kind of a PITA flipping the mower up to get at them but really....not all that bad.

Please take the poll:

I had forgotten that my son found a pile of rocks with the mower last year...but I noticed it wasn't cutting very good...

Grass Gas Plant Tree Wood


It was hard to tell which side was the front and which was the back...

Hood Automotive tire Bumper Automotive design Grey


I think this is as bad as I've ever seen them...

Automotive tire Road surface Wood Asphalt Sunlight


A few minutes with the grinder though...

Tire Motor vehicle Plant Wheel Grass


and they were...well OK. Not perfect but much better than they were.

Automotive tire Tread Tire Synthetic rubber Motor vehicle
 

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I once looked into it after I felt I’d neglected the blades. Through research I found I’d rather leave woody stems looking like a broom rather than a spear - no desire to puncture a tire. Thus, I can’t vote, because the options don’t fit. I never sharpen mine and think it’s for the best.

For clover or other cases where I need a clean cut from sharp blades, I use a 3pt finish mower. That I sharpen every 1-2 years, as is needed.
 

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I used to sharpen mine once per season. That was back when I was targeting saplings and heavy brush. Now I do it twice per season because I am only mowing thick grass and it makes a noticeably nice clean cut.

I know. Shouldn’t be using it for grass, but it really does a nice job. One of these days I’ll trade it up for a finish mower, but for now, it seems to work for me.


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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I used to sharpen mine once per season. That was back when I was targeting saplings and heavy brush. Now I do it twice per season because I am only mowing thick grass and it makes a noticeably nice clean cut.

I know. Shouldn’t be using it for grass, but it really does a nice job. One of these days I’ll trade it up for a finish mower, but for now, it seems to work for me.


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I use mine pretty much the same as you ThreeDogsDown. I am pretty much done cutting brush with mine. I use it more for mowing roads/trails, clover strips, food plots, and most recently - the oats nurse crop I planted with my new alfalfa. I know I need a flail mower to do the job right but I am still in the shopping phase so I had to make do with the brush hog.

I have never had a tractor tire punctured as suggested by @OSXer but a buddy of mine has. That would certainly be a consideration if I was mowing brush.
 

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Just curious if anybody else out there is as bad as I am about neglecting the blades on their brush hog (rotary mower)? I am terrible about it. Don't know why. I'm thinking I should add this to my spring maintenance schedule. It is kind of a PITA flipping the mower up to get at them but really....not all that bad.

Please take the poll:

I had forgotten that my son found a pile of rocks with the mower last year...but I noticed it wasn't cutting very good...

View attachment 561705

It was hard to tell which side was the front and which was the back...

View attachment 561707

I think this is as bad as I've ever seen them...

View attachment 561709

A few minutes with the grinder though...

View attachment 561711

and they were...well OK. Not perfect but much better than they were.

View attachment 561713
That looks like it would work better as a crimper for the buffalo system than a mower!!
 

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Just curious if anybody else out there is as bad as I am about neglecting the blades on their brush hog (rotary mower)? I am terrible about it. Don't know why. I'm thinking I should add this to my spring maintenance schedule. It is kind of a PITA flipping the mower up to get at them but really....not all that bad.

Please take the poll:

I had forgotten that my son found a pile of rocks with the mower last year...but I noticed it wasn't cutting very good...

View attachment 561705

It was hard to tell which side was the front and which was the back...

View attachment 561707

I think this is as bad as I've ever seen them...

View attachment 561709

A few minutes with the grinder though...

View attachment 561711

and they were...well OK. Not perfect but much better than they were.

View attachment 561713
I bought mine in 2014 and have never sharpened them. I am afraid to look at them. It still cuts so I guess its fine

Sent from my SM-G986U using Michigan Sportsman mobile app
 

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I used mine for everything from 2” saplings to mowing clover. Mine hardly ever gets used anymore because my plots and trail systems are pretty well established. I have two flail mowers that do all the work now. The only use the hog gets is corn stalk chopping the following spring and that’s not every year due to weather conditions.
 

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The last ten pound rock inspired some grinding...

I left a couplesixteenths flat on the leading edges. Not wanting a sharp edge to roll when whacking brush.

I mow a lot with it though so it's a balance between a blunt leading edge preferred for brush hogging , and a finer edge for grass.
When the stuff mowed is two-three foot and there's only about 9 h.p. driving the operation , too blunt of blades gets too boggy on full swaths.
Proven by the ten pound rock incident...:(

Sky Plant Cloud Tree Natural landscape
 

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The rig I sold this spring included a 4' bush hog. I had everything for around 14 years and had never done anything with that blade. Changed out the finish mower blades but never the bush hog...until I hit a rock.

I still don't understand how but the blade literally disappeared!! I looked all over for it and still haven't run across it a couple years later. I was near my wife's veggie garden and am very thankful no one was outside at the time. I'm guessing if it went such a distance that I can't find it that it also could've cut someone in half like a bad magic act!

My new, larger rotary is hooked up as I type this and I've already purchased a second blade to switch out when the time comes. To me it's kind of like a chainsaw; I'd rather have extra blades for it and the finish mower so I don't have any down time when I'm already taking bolts out. I'll keep one sharp for the rotation, same with the finish mower. I cut more tall weeds than brush so it's to be determined how often I'll be changing it out.
 

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I can't help but hit large rocks etc.

I don't see any reason to sharpen the blades, unless they get imbalanced.

I've got nearly 20 years on my kk and it will get a work over this winter, probably.

Nothing I want to mow needs a quality cut.
 
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