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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been checking out the Hobie Line of Kayaks. Think I might like the whole Mirage Drive concept, the seat design, the add on options like the motor etc.

I am pretty much a novice and wondering if anyone has one of these, or knows anyone who does, and can give me a review? Any comments about the Hobie from the more seasoned kayakers would be appreciated!
 

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I have been looking at them, and would really like one for certain applications. However, that being said, there are 2 major downfalls of this boat.

First, it is VERY heavy. Don't plan on just tossing it up on the roof of the car by yourself. Alot of guys that have them have gone to using trailers.

Second issue, and the most obvious....... $$$$ Pricey $$$$
 

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A friend of mine is on her second Hobie Mirage. She purchased a Hobie Sport I think, the smallest mirage drive boat and used it for about a year. She sold that and purchased 2 regular SINK kayaks so she would have one for a friend. That lasted a season. She just purchased a 13' Hobie Revolution with the mirage drive. That thing is pretty darn fast!

She does not fish, just recreational "paddling".

They are a well designed and well built boat. Very durable...and like mentioned, they are not lightweights but they can take some abuse. The Mirage drive is nice but you have no reverse. There is more maintainance with all the moving parts of the mirage drive. You can remove the drive and paddle if you plan on fishing in shallow rocky conditions. The drive does fold flat against the hull but can still be damaged. I'm not a big fan of their seats but most SOT's have so so seats. Consider an aftermarket seat but the good ones can add $150-$200 to an already expensive boat. They come with a paddle but it is just an ok paddle. If you plan to paddle much at all, you'll need to invest another $100-$150 in a quality paddle and it will be money well spent. Hobie does have a decent line of fishing accessories for their boats but like everything else, they are pricey. Most other accessories that folks use on other SOT's will also work justfine on the Hobie's

The Hobie Pro Angler is the "22ft loaded Ranger bass boat" of the kayak world...it really is more boat than kayak but it can be paddled. Fully rigged it is well over 100#'s so while people do car top it, it takes the right rack and a strong back! A trailer is almost mandatory.

They are expensive so it depends on what is a value to you. My wife has a Native with the Propel system and it is expensive but the two of them think the ability to to peddle instead of paddle is worth every penny. And when they are tooling around with little to no effort and sipping a cold beverage they sometimes laugh at me paddling! And there is something to be said about hands free kayaking for fishing...

Find a dealer that will let you demo one if you can. Don't rule out used boats so keep an eye out on CL. However, they do not last long, so be quick if you find a boat you like.
 

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Don't rule out used boats so keep an eye out on CL. However, they do not last long, so be quick if you find a boat you like.
Yup, very hard to find them and they go fast. Looking around online, you do see a decent number of them down in FL, and a few in Wisc, but have only seen a couple used ones for sale in the last 2-3 yrs in Mich.
 

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Yup, very hard to find them and they go fast. Looking around online, you do see a decent number of them down in FL, and a few in Wisc, but have only seen a couple used ones for sale in the last 2-3 yrs in Mich.
It's crazy. My friend sold her Outback sport within hours of listing it with a full price offer. She purchased her Revolution used from Indianapolis. She called and purchased it the first day it was listed. In her 3 hour run to Indy, the guy said he had a dozen offers! Vigilance and luck I guess but she got her boat! I never did ask what she paid for it but it is in like new condition with only a few normal scuffs on the bottom of the hull.
 

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I never did ask what she paid for it but it is in like new condition with only a few normal scuffs on the bottom of the hull.
Probably not much less than full retail price. Those things hold their value very well....mainly because they are so hard to find.
 

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Got a buddy that has been kayak fishing on Lake Michigan and the harbors for several years now and gets out quite often almost year round. He catches an impressive amount of fish.

He's on to his second Hobie and he tells me that there's no way he'd do without the pedal drive. He says it's made it soooo much easier to troll and play fish, plus he feels the hobie is a very stable unit.

This guy is part owner of Lake Michigan Angler out of Winthrop Harbor, IL, his name's Rob. Give him a shout and I am sure he'd be happy to share his experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Awesome feedback!! Thanks.

Hobie does seem a bit on the pricey end. Although I don't like to pay the full retail price for anything I will do it on occasion for something that is quality and offers longevity.....I think the stability allowing someone to stand is a pretty cool feature.

I looked at the Native as well....other than peddle drive I don't know if the two are really similar? It appears that to get the native equipped to the same degree as the hobie pro angler the costs would be very close?

Am I missing any other peddle type fishing rigs????

I know that is definitely a feature I want to have...
 

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Here ya go.......



Stable, peddle driven, and room for a friend and even a cooler.

:lol:
 

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:lol:
Now, I spent hundreds of hours fishing from a paddle boat in my youth! It actually worked pretty darn good! The one I used had a good sized platform that made standing easy. It was not stealth however! And boat control was somewhat lacking.:lol: Caught a lot of fish though.

Native and Hobie are the only two right now that offer a pedal type system that I am aware of. It is a pretty small market. Native has two models, the Ultimate and the Mariner. The Mariner is the closest to the Hobie Pro Angler but it is smaller and lighter. It is still heavy. The one thing the Native version has is reverse though and that can be very handy when fighting a fish. The Native system requires about 18" of water to run and it is not very weedless. You can pull the system up out of the water and still fish those areas but to me it is kind of a hassle. For open water trolling though the system is tremendous. Once moving the pedaling is smooth and easy....you could pedal all day. Both the Ultimate and the Marinar paddle like a normal kayak if one wanted to. The Hobie PA can be paddled as well.
The Marinar sells for around $2100 but I've seen it for considerable less and the PA around $2500. The seating systems on both are as comfortable as it gets in the Kayak world.

Considering that today you can spend $500 and get a decent useable SOT fishing kayak from a discount mart, any yak in the $2000 range is going to be a small market item for all but serious enthusiasts. The average guy that just wants to get on the water to fish is not going to drop that kind of money. But to those of us that fishing from a kayak is our thing, it's not hard to understand spending the money.
 

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Awesome feedback!! Thanks.

Hobie does seem a bit on the pricey end. Although I don't like to pay the full retail price for anything I will do it on occasion for something that is quality and offers longevity.....I think the stability allowing someone to stand is a pretty cool feature.
One thing with kayaks, when you see an MSRP, that is pretty much what they sell for. Street price is rarely different and when it is, $50-$100 is about the most you see taken off the price. You can find deals and sales from time to time...I purchased my first Native from the GR spring show a few years back and saved a couple hundred bucks. Most dealers will give a decent discount on accessories at the time of purchase though. It can pay to shop around but most dealers will be in the same ball park so find a dealer you're comfortable with and make the purchase if going new.
 

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I have a 2010 Hobie Pro Angler which I use a lot on northern Lk MI. Yes, expensive. Yes, heavy. No, I would never consider going to a different fishing platform. This "kayak" is designed for fishing, so if that is not your application then there would be others to consider. I have been a couple miles out in 3 ft swells (magnified to the occasional 6 ft wall by passing large boats) and had no problems. I routinely do 5-10 miles of trolling without feeling wasted, because leg muscles are much stronger and less prone to fatigue than arm muscles. Besides that, having 2 hands free for playing and landing a steelhead, lake trout or salmon is a major plus. I carry mine around in the back of my pickup truck, with a bed extender inserted in the trailer hitch receiver. I find it easier to carry this way and launch using a cart inserted into scuppers than to use a trailer. Also, with the water levels so low now, I am launching at places where nobody can get a trailer into the water. My only caution about the PA is that you need to be careful coming in when there is a breaking surf. Although quite stable when going perpendicular through waves, it can be tipped if you take breaking waves over the side. Not usually a dangerous situation, since the waves generally don't break and pitch forward until they reach the lake bottom, typically 3 ft of water or less. So if coming in on a wndy day, you will want to be sure to batten down the hatches, secure the rods, lremove the Mirage Drive and secure it, and then paddle like crazy to surf in on the breaking waves.
 

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Just back from Shark fishing in S. Carolina in a Hobie Angler. Worked great in the ocean, don't think I would want one for my type if MI fishing. Would be hard to fish the rivers that have shallow rock sections. That said. they would be great in a lake, use a trailer to transport. They are so stable you could almost dance on one, very easy to stand up in. but..............pricey and very heavy. I like my Ocean Kayak Trident 11.
 
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