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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It’s time for us inland lake anglers to fight back against application of herbicides in waters of the state to destroy weed beds. These are public trust resources that fish and other aquatic organisms depend upon for food and habitat. Please write your elected officials to plead with them to put an end to this destructive practice.
 

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I gladly pay to have Milfoil treated in our lake.


 

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I agree except for invasive species. The Fisheries Division agrees too. The DEQ is the one who issues permits and they have very different priorities.
 

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It’s time for us inland lake anglers to fight back against application of herbicides in waters of the state to destroy weed beds. These are public trust resources that fish and other aquatic organisms depend upon for food and habitat. Please write your elected officials to plead with them to put an end to this destructive practice.
You're in the wrong place. This is a forum to share fishing information. Read the room, please.
 

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While we are at it let's talk about banning the nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer we all put on our lawns
 

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I wonder if the OP 'Cleans, Drains, and Drys' his boat every time he goes fishing or recreating. Invasives are just that. And it's only going to get worse. What happens when the lakes are so choked that they become cesspools of weeds and algae.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
If lake associations keep applying herbicides, there won’t be any fishing info to report. For those looking for fishing info, the last two days I fished a lake that doesn’t have herbicide application and limited on nice chunky gills. Fished a different lake today that has had annual herbicide application for about the past 15 years and caught one gill about 7” and three others about 2.5”.

Herbicide application started roughly 40 years ago in an attempt to eradicate milfoil from a few SE Michigan lakes. Since that time, herbicide application has spread all across the state and has been used to eradicate not only milfoil but also to kill native weeds. Beyond the damage herbicides cause, they have been demonstrated to be ineffective to control millfoil.

There are alternatives to herbicides to control aquatics invasive species. Vacuum harvesting and burlap barriers have shown much better success to control milfoil. Lake associations should not be killing native aquatic weeds.
 

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Missaukee used to be good, fun fishing. Sucks now that they kill the weeds.

Swimmers and skiers must bring more money to the state?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes I do check my trailer, boat and motor and drain before leaving the launch. I dry or thoroughly clean before launching again.
 

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I know I have to put some in my pond this year to kill some weeds that have finally spread to far. I think the last time used was 20 years ago. Being that I can take the water the deepest parts of the pond it is easy to get rid of the heavy chemicals and any debris that work their way down.
 

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It’s time for us inland lake anglers to fight back against application of herbicides in waters of the state to destroy weed beds. These are public trust resources that fish and other aquatic organisms depend upon for food and habitat. Please write your elected officials to plead with them to put an end to this destructive practice.
Aquatic plants don't have the volume of lignified tissue that terrestrial plants use and need to remain erect, consequently they use themeium to provide support. Mmechanical harvest of nuisance vegetation removes some of the biomass and associated N and P growth nutrients, but most of these "leak" back into the lake and enabe relatively quick regeneration. The same process is operative once the residual inhibitory concentrations of the herbicide decompose,The broad process that ensues is a spike in Nitrogen and Phosphorus in solution, followed by an increase in phytoplankton production, which increases zooplankton productio which feeds fish. In lakes that have a limited submergent vegetation volume, herbicide treatment might be detrimental to overall productivity and production, but these are not likey to be candidates for herbicide treatment.

A better longterm approach is to limit the palatial lawn area that surrounds the lake and the fertilizer runoff that drives the overproduction of aquatic vegetation. You would be better served in the long-run to attempt to convince the shoreline property owners to establish a zone of natural vegetation in a twenty foot wide strip around the lake's perimeter to suck-up the fertilizer runoff and prevent most of it from entering the lake. But then again, I am not uch of a golf course mentality guy when it comes to lawns .
 

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There are alternatives to herbicides to control aquatics invasive species. Vacuum harvesting and burlap barriers have shown much better success to control milfoil. Lake associations should not be killing native aquatic weeds.
Absolutely agree. It may be a little slower but it may also be a lot more permanent and without the bad side effects of chemical control. Well worth further exploration, especially in lakes that are just starting to get an infestation. Btw, I also drain, wash and dry my boat. The draining takes no longer than the time I need to secure the boat for travel. Keeping the boat clean is just good maintenance on an expensive tool. Drying is usually a matter of letting it sit in the sun for a bit after a wipe down. Another thing I do is plan my trips around locations that have invasives. Lake A has none so I’ll fish it first then go on to milfoil filled Lake B later on. It’s really not that hard.

 

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Absolutely agree. It may be a little slower but it may also be a lot more permanent and without the bad side effects of chemical control. Well worth further exploration, especially in lakes that are just starting to get an infestation. Btw, I also drain, wash and dry my boat. The draining takes no longer than the time I need to secure the boat for travel. Keeping the boat clean is just good maintenance on an expensive tool. Drying is usually a matter of letting it sit in the sun for a bit after a wipe down. Another thing I do is plan my trips around locations that have invasives. Lake A has none so I’ll fish it first then go on to milfoil filled Lake B later on. It’s really not that hard.


Let's see; $29,000 to APPLY the burlap layer over two years to treat less than three acres of infestation. Nope, the barreir still has to be removed and disposed of since it is impregnated with plant fragments of the invasive millfoil; the decoying plant residue must alo be removed via vacuum dredging with no assessment of how long this treatment's impacts will remain. Sounds cost efective to me!
 

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Let's see; $29,000 to APPLY the burlap layer over two years to treat less than three acres of infestation. Nope, the barreir still has to be removed and disposed of since it is impregnated with plant fragments of the invasive millfoil; the decoying plant residue must alo be removed via vacuum dredging with no assessment of how long this treatment's impacts will remain. Sounds cost efective to me!
80,000 a year to spray HL sound like a bargin to me and then kill most of the fishing in these areas. How many years will it be before new testing is developed and then they ill say SORRY we just found a toxic resdue and you can no longer eat the fish or swim in these lakes
 

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If lake associations keep applying herbicides, there won’t be any fishing info to report. For those looking for fishing info, the last two days I fished a lake that doesn’t have herbicide application and limited on nice chunky gills. Fished a different lake today that has had annual herbicide application for about the past 15 years and caught one gill about 7” and three others about 2.5”.

Herbicide application started roughly 40 years ago in an attempt to eradicate milfoil from a few SE Michigan lakes. Since that time, herbicide application has spread all across the state and has been used to eradicate not only milfoil but also to kill native weeds. Beyond the damage herbicides cause, they have been demonstrated to be ineffective to control millfoil.

There are alternatives to herbicides to control aquatics invasive species. Vacuum harvesting and burlap barriers have shown much better success to control milfoil. Lake associations should not be killing native aquatic weeds.
Then sue the lake associations
 

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Buy lake property, join the local Association and express your opinion for that lake. You can't force a blanket mandate for every lake in the State. Permits have to be issued by the state DEQ and they are very strict on the application, quantities used, and areas and types of invasives involved. The applicators are licenced by the state and have to follow strict protocols. They just don't show up and annihilate all the weeds in the lake. The weed control is a temporary solution at best. Most weeds will regenerate after a couple months.

Pollution, septic systems, yard fertilizers, farmland runoff, shoreline erosion from giant wake boats and high speed boating all have more of a detrimental effect on fish than weed control measures.
 
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