Michigan-Sportsman.com banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,850 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am sure this topic has been brought up before and I could have done a search, just running a little short on time this mornng.

I have a deer hanging in the garage since the 19th, 8 days. The temps have remained well under the 40 degree mark and he is clean. I took the hide off after day two.

I am basicly posting this so my wife believes me when I tell her it will be "Fine & Dandy"...

I have to work this morning but will be cutting it up this afternoon and serving one inch thick Back straps for Horderves(sp) with the Turkey...

Thanks,

Rooster
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,196 Posts
It will be fine, but you should have left the hide on as you're going to have to trim away a lot of dried out meat. Also, the hide will help insulate it in the event of a larger fluctuation in temperature.

Most good steakhouses age their meat for at least a month, so 8 days is nothing.

The best deer I've ever eaten was a buck I shot on Dec. 10 and it hung until after Christmas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,767 Posts
You are fine.
For assurance, stick a thermometer into various parts of the deer and take a reading. I let mine hang for 6 days and got readings of 39 - 42.

Hide on or hide off? There's been lots of conversation about that. I leave mine on because I want the least amount of meat exposed to the air. My deer doesn't freeze, so taking the hide off after 6 days isn't a problem.

Here's another thread on the subject
http://www.michigan-sportsman.com/forum/showthread.php?t=262163&highlight=hanging
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35,277 Posts
Tell your wife it should be fine. I hang mine until I have time to butcher them; which reminds me that I had better finish butchering my daughter's deer before the turkey is done. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,650 Posts
I like to hang mine for at least a week, preferably up to two weeks if the weather will permit it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,309 Posts
1-2 weeks is perfect. The longer the better as far as taste, moisture reduction when cooking and tenderness. I take the hide off of mine. Yes you do lose some meat but I think it taste better when skinned and then hung. They don't leave the hide on beef when it ages I don't believe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,196 Posts
1-2 weeks is perfect. The longer the better as far as taste, moisture reduction when cooking and tenderness. I take the hide off of mine. Yes you do lose some meat but I think it taste better when skinned and then hung. They don't leave the hide on beef when it ages I don't believe.
True, but they also have a near perfect temperature and humidity controlled environment. Unless you have a walk in cooler, we don't really have control over mother nature. If I had a cooler, I'd skin them right away as it is so much easier, but over the course of the couple weeks temps can fluctuate, as can humidity, so the hide helps even things out.

Regardless, as long as the temps are between 30-40, the deer can hang for a while with no problem at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,674 Posts
Skin it first then hang, walk into a butcher shop and see how many beef they have aging in the cooler that have hides still on them,,,none.
After you skin the deer, and if you do not want the hide, throw it in a tub of water and see just how dirty it is. All that bactiria worked through the skin into the meat.
This little article, although funny, has some truth to it.


Venison - Beef Blind Taste Test

Controversy has long raged about the relative quality of venison and beef as gourmet food. Some people say that venison is tough, with a strong wild taste. Others insist that venison is tender and its flavor
is delicate.

The MSU Foods Research Department recently conducted a taste test to determine the truth of these conflicting assertions. First, a high-choice Holstein steer was led into a swamp a mile and a half from the nearest road, then shot several times. After only some of the entrails were removed, the carcass was dragged over rocks and logs, through mud and dust, thrown into a pickup truck box and transported through rain and snow 100 miles before being hung out in the sun for 9 days. After that it was lugged into a garage, where it was skinned and rolled around on the floor for a while.

Strict sanitary precautions were observed throughout this test, within the limitations of the butchering environment. For instance, dogs and cats were allowed to sniff at the carcass, but were chased out of the garage if they attempted to lick or take a bite out of the carcass.

Next, the steer was dragged into the house and down the basement steps. Half a dozen inexperienced, but enthusiastic men worked on the carcass with meat saws, cleavers, and dull knives while ingesting massive amounts of warm beer. The result of which was 350 pounds of soup bones, four bushel baskets of meat scraps, and a couple of steaks that were an eighth of an inch thick on one edge and 2 inches thick on the other.

The steaks were fried in a skillet of rancid bacon grease, along with three pounds of onions. After two hours of frying, the contents of the skillet were served to a panel of three blindfolded volunteers. Every one of the members of the panel thought it was venison. One of the members said it tasted exactly like the venison he had eaten at hunting camp for the last 25 years.

The results of this trial indicate conclusively that there is no difference between the taste of high-quality beef and the taste of venison.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,339 Posts
It will be fine, but you should have left the hide on as you're going to have to trim away a lot of dried out meat. Also, the hide will help insulate it in the event of a larger fluctuation in temperature.

Most good steakhouses age their meat for at least a month, so 8 days is nothing.

The best deer I've ever eaten was a buck I shot on Dec. 10 and it hung until after Christmas.
I agree, I don't even start thinking about processing a deer til its hit 17-18 days, and in ideal situations, I let it go over 3 weeks. But Bersh is right, you're better to leave the hide on, not only will it dry the meat up, but it'll also induce more mold growth, (which is good for tenderizing), but on the flip side, it must be cut off during processing, which causes you to lose a little more meat. My friends think its insane, but last year I didn't have the time to abide by my own rule, and I COULD taste a difference in the taste. I should note I have a walk in cooler at my disposal, so I've got a controlled enviroment, but by this time of year, unless it gets really cold you should be able to hang in a garage without it freezing without fail. I shot a buck Nov. 20th, one day after you, I plan on cutting it up sometime around Dec.12-14th. Good luck, and tell the wife to sleep easy, that deer is like wine, it only gets better with age. :)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top