Michigan Sportsman Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question, would it be harmful to use a roller to get good soil contact when I plant some WW in with my brassicas?? They are just starting to pop up and I don't want to stunt their growth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,535 Posts
Harmful? Other than crushing the brassicas that I assume you want to have keep growing? I think yes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
Quick question, would it be harmful to use a roller to get good soil contact when I plant some WW in with my brassicas?? They are just starting to pop up and I don't want to stunt their growth.

Brassicas should be planted about now and grain forages should not be planted until late September. A grain forage plot planted now will be next to worthless by mid October, just at the time when you need it to kick in with young, tender, lush forage. I find it hard to believe how many people plant these early grain plots and IMO gain little to nothing.:dizzy:

Keep these plots separate along with time of planting. If anyone doubts my word here, put in a grain plot now and one in late September and see for yourself which one gets used from October on. Remember, it's the quality of the forage, not the quanity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
i was planing on planting my grain on laborday weekend is that still to early i plan on hunting the second week of oct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
It all depends on where your land is and what food sources are nearby. If you have corn and bean fields around, deer are going to be feeding on that. However, if your land is 100% forest and has zero agricultural fields around the deer will hammer your food plot.
For example, I planted turnips on June 28 of this year. This is way too soon for the "experts". This past weekend we had 7 deer in the plot eating the leaves already. Experts will tell you deer won't touch Brassicas until the first frost, I beg to differ.
I will be planting my Rye on Labor Day weekend. I am hoping that it grows well but know that the deer will keep it down to the dirt.
Think about what is around your land as alternative foods and then decide when to plant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
It all depends on where your land is and what food sources are nearby. If you have corn and bean fields around, deer are going to be feeding on that. However, if your land is 100% forest and has zero agricultural fields around the deer will hammer your food plot.
For example, I planted turnips on June 28 of this year. This is way too soon for the "experts". This past weekend we had 7 deer in the plot eating the leaves already. Experts will tell you deer won't touch Brassicas until the first frost, I beg to differ.
I will be planting my Rye on Labor Day weekend. I am hoping that it grows well but know that the deer will keep it down to the dirt.
Think about what is around your land as alternative foods and then decide when to plant.

Buckman,

All of your statements are essentially correct. Yes, the deer may hit your labor day grain plots early on but will be past their prime come mid October.(At least in Kent County they would be) If people want to plant grain that early-- fine. But I would still set aside an area for planting at least some of their grains at the late September date and see which grain forage plot gets hit when you'll need it the most.

Unlike Brassicas, grain forages loose their tender lushness rapidly after they reach 3-4 inches along with deer usage. I have not yet found a one date fits all for fall plot plantings. Give a later planting a try. I'm confident you won't be disappointed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
so then what would be an ideal date? my property in in mid michigan (harrison) im either going to be up there hunting the 2nd or 3rd week of oct for bow and then opener of gun. last year i planted in the begining of sept and it didnt do so well, i will be planting bfo,ww,and biologic green patch plus ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
River Rat,

I agree with you as well. The more tender the better. However, I feel that it still depends on your specific hunting area. My land is in the up. If I don't get the Rye, ww or bfo germinating by 9/5. It just won't get going unless we have unusual warmth and lots of rain in september. Because the deer in my area are dependant almost exclusively on browse, even "stemy" Rye is much more desireable than twigs and leaves.
The deer won't allow the Rye to get stemy on my land. As soon as it comes up they are hitting it. So I need to watch the weather and plant just prior to a rain.

Buckman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
River Rat,

I agree with you as well. The more tender the better. However, I feel that it still depends on your specific hunting area. My land is in the up. If I don't get the Rye, ww or bfo germinating by 9/5. It just won't get going unless we have unusual warmth and lots of rain in september. Because the deer in my area are dependant almost exclusively on browse, even "stemy" Rye is much more desireable than twigs and leaves.
The deer won't allow the Rye to get stemy on my land. As soon as it comes up they are hitting it. So I need to watch the weather and plant just prior to a rain.

Buckman
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
823 Posts
River Rat,

I agree with you as well. The more tender the better. However, I feel that it still depends on your specific hunting area. My land is in the up. If I don't get the Rye, ww or bfo germinating by 9/5. It just won't get going unless we have unusual warmth and lots of rain in september. Because the deer in my area are dependant almost exclusively on browse, even "stemy" Rye is much more desireable than twigs and leaves.
The deer won't allow the Rye to get stemy on my land. As soon as it comes up they are hitting it. So I need to watch the weather and plant just prior to a rain.

Buckman
You're right, every area is different. And it sounds like you're doing your share of experimenting. That is the key. Knowledge + experimentation= optimum results.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,865 Posts
Our property is about 1 hr south of yours and we plant our rye or winter wheat as close to labor day as we can. The deer feed on it all winter long. They will dig through the snow for it. It has always been great for muzzleloading. Like you we are in the woods with just acorns. We have seen up to 10 bucks on it at a time.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
328 Posts
hey ridgewalker how does your plots do during october for bowseason and how big are ur plots
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,463 Posts
A pretty fair...tho not perfect....guage as to when to plant your wheat (don't know much 'bout rye) is to google up the Hessian Fly date for your area of Michigan.

The Ag Dpt publishes a map or chart as to when they recommend planting winter wheat....the farther north the earlier the planting date. Not for 'forage tenderness' but to avoid fly infestation. It just so happens that those dates correspond with having that tenderness factor.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,596 Posts
Labor day weekend is usually a fairly safe bet for planting cereal grains. However, if we have a warm fall like we did last year than it is too early. Last year my labor day planted rye was 12" by the end of October. The deer used it hard the first two weeks of October, but after that the plot was totally and completely ignored (in an area with high deer densities and little/no AG). I'm now of the mindset that for northern and mid-michigan Labor day weekend is still okay, but a week or even two later might be better. I've planted rye as late as the weekend prior to bow season, and still had good results.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top