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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New hunter here. I know it's not optimal but what's everyone's opinion on using a 16 gauge with #2's for geese? It's all I have for now.
 

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that will kill geese no problem.
my buddies kid has killed many using a 20g with #4's.
 

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I hunted with a young man last year that shot two giant canada geese with a 20 gauge shotgun and #2 steel. Both birds were shot 30-35 yards and both were dead when they hit the ground.

I do a lot of waterfowl hunting with a 16 gauge shotgun. I reload and when I use the 16 gauge for geese, I use 7/8 oz of #1 or #B steel for geese. That being said, I do prefer my 12 gauge for goose hunting.

Neither the 16 gauge nor the #2 steel are ideal for canada geese. However, it can be done if you let the birds work close.
 

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Lead them a little more than you think you need to or be sure to focus on the cheek patch and a found of two's is plenty on early season geese. Late birds with fát and down take a bit more killing.
 

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I hunted with a young man last year that shot two giant canada geese with a 20 gauge shotgun and #2 steel. Both birds were shot 30-35 yards and both were dead when they hit the ground.

I do a lot of waterfowl hunting with a 16 gauge shotgun. I reload and when I use the 16 gauge for geese, I use 7/8 oz of #1 or #B steel for geese. That being said, I do prefer my 12 gauge for goose hunting.

Neither the 16 gauge nor the #2 steel are ideal for canada geese. However, it can be done if you let the birds work close.

My 12 yr old son shoots a 16 ga. It is an Ithaca featherweight model built in the 40's. The older guns from 30s and 40s were built for smaller statured men. the featherweight models have lighter barrels so he could handle it better than a 20 gauge. When you look into the difference between a 20 ga 3" shell in number 2 shot and a 2 3/4" 16 ga there is only like 4 pellets difference. The 3" 20 ga shell is what killed the popularity of the 16. It made the 16 sort of obsolete.

He had no issue dumping geese with 2 shot during the late season last yr when we were field hunting. The big downside is the lack of available shells/shot selection and the cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My 12 yr old son shoots a 16 ga. It is an Ithaca featherweight model built in the 40's. The older guns from 30s and 40s were built for smaller statured men. the featherweight models have lighter barrels so he could handle it better than a 20 gauge. When you look into the difference between a 20 ga 3" shell in number 2 shot and a 2 3/4" 16 ga there is only like 4 pellets difference. The 3" 20 ga shell is what killed the popularity of the 16. It made the 16 sort of obsolete.

He had no issue dumping geese with 2 shot during the late season last yr when we were field hunting. The big downside is the lack of available shells/shot selection and the cost.
That's what I have. An Ithaca featherweight. Love the gun. Killed one Sunday night but just wanted some opinions to make sure it wasn't a fluke.
 

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A 16g 2.75" #2 would do the trick just fine IMO. You get some pattern in the head and neck within 40 yards and even #5 steel will take them down. If I am hunting geese only I will throw the kitchen sink at them (12g BBB 3.5" anti-aircraft shells), but any other time it's 12g 3" #2s all day and the geese are coming down and my ducks aren't shredded up either.

Oh, I should also add, an 80 year old 16g double barrel side-by-side was all I had for a while too, and it took everything down from grouse to thunder chickens. One time turkey hunting all I could find close enough to a turkey shell the day before was a nitro steel #5, and I shot a turkey at 40 yards and it went right down, but I'm pretty sure that was more the magic pellet doing it's job, who knows....
 
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