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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a call over the weekend from a friend whos property ajoins the property that i bowhunt.Well it turns out their teenage daughter found the skeletal remains of a deer in a swampy area on their property(arrow laying next to it)Well long story short on examining the arrow she had at the house I realized it must be the buck I shot and couldnt find in early Nov.I shot this buck on an evening hunt right before dark placing what I thought was a great shot straight down through right between the shoulder blades(deer was right under my stand)I watched the direction it ran l,gave it about a half an hour until dark ,quietly left stand and returned the next morning to retrieve my deer.Next returned to stand ,no blood trail,no deer ,nothing .All total I spent at least 12 hrs searching adjoing woods and fields in the direction i saw him run off.Using my gps I did a 3 ft by 3 ftgrid pattern search logging about 7miles .Nothing.Forward to this weekend I find the nice 8 point in the complete opposite direction that it ran off and out of sight in ,only aprox. 200 yds from my stand!!!!Excuse me Im going to be sick now.
 

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I am very sorry to hear your story. Its one we as bow hunters all can relate to. My only observation is that that shot is not a good one. I wasnt there so i cant judge but i have been in that situation twice before. The first time i shot and MISSED a beautiful buck. The second time i held my cool and waited for him to pass under and shot him quartering away at 10 yards. He ran 20 yards and fell. I am sorry to hear but at least you got the horns. ( some consilation huh? ) Good luck this year...
 

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Live and learn. Sorry to hear of your sad story.

Gotta tell you though, straight down between the shoulder blades is a bow shot that you should not take.
 

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I know it is a horrible feeling to hit a deer and not be able to recover it. The story is even worse when a person makes a shot on a deer and does not recover it and does not learn from it. There are a lot of ways to learn and unfortunatly mistakes are one of them. I know two people who made that same shot last year, and neither of them recovered there deer either (except one of them a nice 10 point was found durring Muzzleloader season with the arrow). I know there are times when people make a straight down shot and recover the deer, and sometimes recover it easily, but it is not a high percentage shot and probably should not be taken. But this is how we learn, from our mistakes, and from others who are willing to admit to there mistakes so maybe someone else can be spared from making the same one. Like my dad always says, "If hind sight was forsight we would all be happily married millionaires." I am not putting you down at all, I too have made shots I probably shouldn't have, as have many archers, just stating my views. Good luck next season.
 

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I have to agree with the guy's above. It is not a shot that that should be taken with a bow. Most deer are not recovered with that shot.
 

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Rather than just saying, don't do that, I'll elaborate.

The chest of a whitetail is quite deep, the area around the sholders is covered with lots of muscle, and the brest bone is at the bottom of the chest. Complete penetration by an arrow is highly unlikely. It is only a waste if you didn't learn something from it and repeat the mistake.

Chin up and good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Actually ,I hit deer just behind shoulder at a severe downward angle.Ive had success in the past with this shot (spine).However if spine is not hit your looking at best a one lunger.I wont be taking this high risk shot ever again ,its just not worth it.In hindsight I should have waited for a more quartering away shot or just passed completely.Never Again.
 

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trophy buck under stand, waited all year for opportunity, adrenaline is pumping, split second to make decision,


bottom line is we learn from our mistakes, and hopefully next time a brute will be 15 yards broadside, with his foot forward and looking the other way, like some seem to think happens ALL the time. ;) :D :)

I wish!!
 

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KillnGrill,

Same thing happened to me a few years ago on a doe. Seemed like a great shot, althought the arrow didn't pass through, and even thought I heard the deer go down. Spent many hours over two days and never found a drop of blood after the first 40 yards. Of course, I never recovered the deer. Yeah, it's a sick feeling. I don't plan on taking this shot again.

Good luck this year,
John E.
Ypsi
 

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I feel for you. It figures that it wound up the opposite direction from where it originally ran. I've recovered a few that have done that. Was that the direction it came from? I find that after being hit they almost always go back the way the came.
 

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Originally posted by WILDCATWICK
Was that the direction it came from? I find that after being hit they almost always go back the way the came.
Often times a wounded deer will turn at some point to put his/her nose into the wind. We have found a few deer using this trick in the past.
 

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Don't take this the wrong way folks, but unless we want to just kill deer, I'm starting to think we should issue archery tags to people after they get some advanced training. The poor shot placement excuse is getting old. :(
 

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Could you tell where you actually shot the deer from the remains?

If you placed the shot where you aimed, the deer should have drop from a spine shot. I have take this shot several times and dropped them where the stand.

My guess is that you shot farther back then you thought and was off center a bit. This is a shot that most people to not practice. I do and have found it a good thing to practice..... has put several nice deer in the freezer.
 

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KILLnGRILL,
One question...when you said "l gave it about a half an hour until dark, quietly left stand and returned the next morning to retrieve my deer. Next returned to stand ,no blood trail,no deer ,nothing."... did you locate the beginning of the blood trail before you left for the night? If not, it was a fatal error on your part. Here's what I'm getting at, and seriously I'm not being critical, but I've learned from this and hopefully others can also. I have a very close friend who is about as close to a deer expert as I've ever known. So much so that we call him "the Deer Professor". He truly eats, sleeps, and thinks like a whitetail all year long. But there's one problem. Time and time again over the last 25 years of hunting, in the heat of the moment in the excitement right after the hit, he forgets to find the start of the blood trail. Then we scramble, often in the dark, to locate the place to start. He did it again this past fall on a beautiful 10 point. Fortunately we found it within an hour or so anyway. But what I'm saying is, in your description you don't say you got out of the tree, found the spot where the deer was standing, located the blood trail, then left for the night. You need to mark the starting point with toilet paper or some other means. As we all know, the woods look very different in the daylight versus the dark. Imagine hitting a deer a half hour before dark, waiting in the stand until dark, then getting down and trying to locate the spot where the deer last was when it looks so different in the dark. It's really tough to do. So again my suggestion, if you didn't do this, is to IMMEDIATELY get down out of the tree and mark the spot while there's still daylight. Then wait it out for a while before pursuing the trail, or simply coming back tomorrow. It may not have done any good in this particular case, but from experience I'll also speculate that it may in fact have helped you get started on the right path. Just a thought.
 

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When searching for lost sign I usually start by working in small circles and little by little bigger and bigger circles, more often than not there is a change in direction.
 

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just ducky, 99.9% of the time that shot will not leave a blood trail.
 

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Good point FREEPOP. Then I clarify my original statement......did you find the beginning of the "trail", whether it happens to be a blood trail, or just simply the leaves all messed up where the deer jumped quickly to escape, or the tracks in the snow if there is any. My point was you really need to mark the spot where you begin your search. Otherwise, you're really putting yourself in a hole right off the get go. A lot of times in a fall woodlot you can see the faint path in the leaves if you start at the point where the deer suddenly jumped at the shot. Sometimes you have to get right down on your hands and knees and study the forest floor, but it's often visible if you look hard enough. At least that would give you an idea of direction, and you wouldn't be coming back looking completely blindly. The circling method is one I've used often also, but it sounds like KILLnGRILL did something like that the next day. Again guys, I'm not being critical of KILLnGRILL here....just trying to pass on a little knowledge gained the hard way.
 

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We carry a junk practice arrow and shoot it where the deer was. That way we sneak out and come back at a time we feel comfortable tracking as determined by the hit and reaction of the deer.
 

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Another good idea. Anything you can do to give you your bearings when you start back at it, whether it's in an hour, or the next morning. I have all kinds of things in my fannypack for this purpose such as pieces of orange or chartreuse ribbon, large twist ties, etc. Toilet paper works in a pinch (no pun intended) but if it rains, the paper doesn't last. Lot's of tricks to the game.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for all of the advice guys but anwer your question I did note where he was when I shot .There was bare spot on in front of my stand where leaves blew off a slight knoll,he was standing directly on this spot ,also found my arrow nock on this spot.After shot I noted direction he ran off in until out of sight ,I then thought I heard him fall and thrash around a bit then silence .In my mind he ran maybe 100yds in the one direction crashed and died therefore I just quietly slipped out of my stand to retrieve my deer the next day.I culdnt believe it the next morning when my deer was not there.I also tried the circular search method ,crawling on my hands and knees but not 1 drop of blood was found.The only thing I could do was to search the area in direction I saw And heard deer go.As it turns out this deer didnt really go that far at all and I about wore out my boots searching ,but I concentrated my search pattern on the info I had at the time described above.From now on if a double lung isnt possible im not so sure Im shootin.
 
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