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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever been sick from eating Canada goose? Last week we put down a few birds, we processed them quickly, and that same day slow cooked the legs and ate them. I was fine, but the other person who ate them was not—vomiting, diarrhea, the whole nine yards. We figured it must've been a stomach bug, or that he ate something bad that I didn't.

Tonight we cooked breasts from the freezer. It's almost the same situation as last time! He's currently parked in the bathroom, meanwhile I'm feeling mostly fine, with the slightest bit of queasiness (so slight that it very well could be in my head.)

I'm perplexed about what could be causing such a violent reaction in one of us while the other is largely fine. Needless to say we won't be eating the rest of the breasts that we have in the freezer...
 

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Has anyone ever been sick from eating Canada goose? Last week we put down a few birds, we processed them quickly, and that same day slow cooked the legs and ate them. I was fine, but the other person who ate them was not—vomiting, diarrhea, the whole nine yards. We figured it must've been a stomach bug, or that he ate something bad that I didn't.

Tonight we cooked breasts from the freezer. It's almost the same situation as last time! He's currently parked in the bathroom, meanwhile I'm feeling mostly fine, with the slightest bit of queasiness (so slight that it very well could be in my head.)

I'm perplexed about what could be causing such a violent reaction in one of us while the other is largely fine. Needless to say we won't be eating the rest of the breasts that we have in the freezer...
salmonella
 

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I eould guess an E. coli strain caused the symptoms...
Did you stack them up together in a pile? Did any of the birds sit in the sun for an extended period prior cleaning. Any of the cleaned birds get really shot-up via their abdomens and then get left in the sun or sit in hot weather? I stopped hunting with a group who liked to stack all their birds in a pile to make counting easieer...safe food handling was not a priority, and your experience sounds lke the same outcome-enteric bacteria likely leaked-out in quantity and got spread all over the legs and breast meat via rinsing. After that, all refrigeration would achieve is to retard their growth rates, not eliminate their proliferation. Any shot-up birds always go in a bowl of strong kosher salt brine for an hour in the fridge prior removal of all the clotted blood and damaged tissue.
 

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Any of my wild game Fowl always gets the salt soaking. You can shoot those Geese look over a hour later and see the maggots already on them. I do only take the Breasts of Geese now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks everyone. They did not sit in a pile or in the sun, but I suppose it's possible that enteric bacteria did leak and then get transferred to other pieces during the cleaning process. Next time we'll definitely give them the salt soak treatment.
 

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I'd be careful about soaking them. If there is contamination it'll likely just spread it from one piece of the bird to the rest. I'd just make sure to be extra careful in the future while cleaning the birds and try to reduce contamination as much as possible. Dispose of any meat that has made contact with waste, and make sure to use a different board and knife to trim or cut the meat than you do break the bird apart.

Has this other person eaten goose in the past without issues? Perhaps it's something else? I would think that slow cooking the legs pretty much rules out a bacterial contamination being the issue as even Salmonella is easily killed at those temps.
 

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Given the lack of symptoms in one versus the other, it could be a food allergy. If you're concerned about bacteria you can get a meat thermometer and cook to at least 165 degrees. They'll probably be more cooked than you like them, but it's better than throwing them in the trash. I soak goose for two days in salt water, rinsing them and then changing the water after a day, and I've never gotten sick from cooking them medium rare.
 

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Has he eaten other red meat since the goose incident? Perhaps he acquired the tick borne illness of not being able to consume red meat. I’m drawing a blank on its name right now…
 
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Has he eaten other red meat since the goose incident? Perhaps he acquired the tick borne illness of not being able to consume red meat. I’m drawing a blank on its name right now…
Don’t say thatttt
I wouldn’t wish that on my worst enemy
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Given the lack of symptoms in one versus the other, it could be a food allergy. If you're concerned about bacteria you can get a meat thermometer and cook to at least 165 degrees. They'll probably be more cooked than you like them, but it's better than throwing them in the trash. I soak goose for two days in salt water, rinsing them and then changing the water after a day, and I've never gotten sick from cooking them medium rare.
I was thinking food allergy or intolerance as well. There are several foods that I could eat when I was younger but can't now because they just tear up my insides.
 

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Given the lack of symptoms in one versus the other, it could be a food allergy. If you're concerned about bacteria you can get a meat thermometer and cook to at least 165 degrees. They'll probably be more cooked than you like them, but it's better than throwing them in the trash. I soak goose for two days in salt water, rinsing them and then changing the water after a day, and I've never gotten sick from cooking them medium rare.
I'm not a waterfowl hunter and think goose tastes like crap but food allergy was my first thought.
 

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I'm not a waterfowl hunter and think goose tastes like crap but food allergy was my first thought.
Breast a goose, brine it for twenty four hours and then toss it on the grill and cook to medium rare. I think your perspective will be significantly altered about their taste. You can also roll it in Italian bread crumbs and bake with an off the shelf pasta sauce which also removes their livery taste. Just don't over cook them, why the brine soak helps both in tast and food safety.

The geese currently being shot are mostly local giants, non-mating giants that "summered" on the north side of Superior and are migrating back into the state and some Canada produced birds starting to move. Not very high probability that ANY of them have had contact with lonestar ticks, given their distribution. What I can tell you is that E. coli strains, Listeria sp., Salmonella sp., Campylobacter sp. Clostridium sp, Shigella sp. all cause the same symptoms via food poisoning but an Eschericia coli strain that is the main culprit is a Shiga-toxin producer, which would have the highest variation in terms of whose immune system reacts violently to it or does not. Onset of symptoms is highly variable as well. Generally, these other two gram-negatives result in a more violent and marked response. Why it was my guess.

A high salinity salt soak kills bacteria as well as aiding tenderizing the meat. If you really want to play it safe add some brown sugar to the Kosher salt soak at a quarter of a cup of sugar, just under of half C of Kosher salt or canning salt per quart of cold qwater This isotonic solution causes the bacteria to lose there internal water component content and then collapse, destroying the cell membrane and killing the cell. Why brining meat has been a means of preservation for centuries.
 

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Breast a goose, brine it for twenty four hours and then toss it on the grill and cook to medium rare. I think your perspective will be significantly altered about their taste. You can also roll it in Italian bread crumbs and bake with an off the shelf pasta sauce which also removes their livery taste. Just don't over cook them, why the brine soak helps both in tast and food safety.

The geese currently being shot are mostly local giants, non-mating giants that "summered" on the north side of Superior and are migrating back into the state and some Canada produced birds starting to move. Not very high probability that ANY of them have had contact with lonestar ticks, given their distribution. What I can tell you is that E. coli strains, Listeria sp., Salmonella sp., Campylobacter sp. Clostridium sp, Shigella sp. all cause the same symptoms via food poisoning but an Eschericia coli strain that is the main culprit is a Shiga-toxin producer, which would have the highest variation in terms of whose immune system reacts violently to it or does not. Onset of symptoms is highly variable as well. Generally, these other two gram-negatives result in a more violent and marked response. Why it was my guess.

A high salinity salt soak kills bacteria as well as aiding tenderizing the meat. If you really want to play it safe add some brown sugar to the Kosher salt soak at a quarter of a cup of sugar, just under of half C of Kosher salt or canning salt per quart of cold qwater This isotonic solution causes the bacteria to lose there internal water component content and then collapse, destroying the cell membrane and killing the cell. Why brining meat has been a means of preservation for centuries.
I made jerky. Tasted like their poop smells.
 
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