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Say My Name.
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Surveying the landscape in my square-mile section and the 8 surrounding sections (roughly a 1.5 mile radius), there are a good 10-15 plots of standing corn still out there, probably amounting to a total of over 300 acres of the stuff. None of the corn is on my property.

As long as that corn is still up, it remains deer magnet #1.

My brassicas and wheat are getting nibbled on gingerly. The deer have abandoned the clover plots; no where did I see any of the snow pawed off them. And they are likewise ignoring the Buck Forage Oats and Turnips.

Just slays me to see so many tons of good forage go to waste!

Wait till next year...;)
 

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FL,

I still have approx. 75 acres of corn still standing on my property (5 and 8 acre food plots and 62 acres that has not been harvested) and we have not been seeing nearly the numbers of deer that we did earlier in the season. Obviously, many were shot around me, but you would think that this amount of corn would help draw other deer onto my property. There is only one other field within 2 miles of me that is still standing, but I think most of the deer are holed in the center of my larger field. We have been seeing a fair amount of tracks and good numbers shining at night, which tells me that they are moving mostly at night.

"Wait till next year"

We just developed film from one of our cameras and in the two weeks following gun season, we have had eight different 1.5 yo bucks entering our main santuary and they all should have made it to this point. Unfortunately, we haven't gotten any pictures of older bucks, but this is a great start for next year.

HM
 

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so far the deer have yet to touch my turnips and rape.they are still digging at the clover in spots and hitting the wheat and tritcale. the biggest surprise has been my standing beans. they have been in them just about every evening even though the seeds are gone.
 

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Farm Legend:

Your excess forage is not going to waste. The winter has just started and my guess is your turnips and other uneaten forage will be there for the deer in Febuary and March (the critical winter stress period). It is the right thing to plant plots as a winter carry over forage. In fact the bulk of my food plots are designed as a winter carry over food. FL, if there is forage left after winter you have succeeded.

I just had a skull with attached antlers scored by a certified CBM member last friday. It scored 190 2/8 net non typical. This guy was the biggest buck of ten mature bucks that stayed on my farm in the summer of 2000 in Gladwin County (a county not known for big bucks). The last time I saw him was September 15th with three other monsters that same year. My thought is he was poached shortly afterward but not retrieved, for he was found 50 yards off my property line on November 3rd 2001 (one year later) by my neigbor as he was pat hunting. This guy is the biggest non typical in Gladwin or Clare County by 10 points.

Farmlegend, only after I planted enough forage, starting in 1996, to insure winter carry over for my resident deer did I see the big change in their weight and antler mass. I have mentioned in the past that standing corn alone will carry the deer nicely through a winter of any magnutude, which is true but more should be done if you want to improve their weight and antler mass. The theory of well begun is half done applies to deer also.

My main forage for winter carry over on this farm is standing corn (11 acres), A brassica mix that includes turnips planted in May (three-five acres) and RR soybesns planted in May (three-five acres). This gives the deer a choice of high energy or high protien forage right to the first of April and sometimes longer. Some years my corn will last all sumer long. As soon as RR sugar beets become commercially available (two years) I will include them as another primary winter carry over forage.

I have discussed my formula with Dr. Grant Woods, whom I consider the nutrition guru of all nutritionists and expressed my feeling that deer should have a choice year round of high energy and protein and he agrees to that thought. Last week he told me that he thought that energy was the key. I expect to see him on March sixth and delve deeper into this energy theory. Most deer nutritionists put the emphasis on protein. In fact I expect Dr. Woods to call me today and maybe he will give me more detailed info on this emphasis on energy.

Keep the fun in hunting!

P.S. Just got off the phone with Dr. Grant Woods and hope I get this accurate.

Dr woods feels that corn is the single most important forage there is. It is not because it is high in protein, which it isn't (7-9 percent) but it because it is highly digestable and very high in energy. This very highly digestable energy is what feeds the bacteria in the deers digestion system. This energized bacteria grows into the billions of micro organisms and dies daily. Only with a constant supply of highly digestable carboyhydrates (energy) will the bacteria reach this high population density. Protein will only be digested if this bacteria is available and the more bacteria the more the complex proteins are digested and assimulated into the deers system.

Dr. Woods formula is 75% corn and 25% soy meal in the winter, with the opposite of 75% soy meal and 25% corn for supplementally fed deer during the summer. During spring and fall this ration is 50% each for corn and soy meal.

Dr. Woods manages many deer ranch's and some of them due to high deer density need to feed supplementally. He cautions that this ration will kill deer if that is all they get to eat. They need to have at least 50% of their ration in natural forage. We do not need to go to this style and it is illegal in Mi. We can make it happen by planting the forage I mentioned and have it available year round.
 

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RR sugar beets in two years. WOW. Can't wait. Boy! Also can't wait to see the post on baiting versus food plots when we get RR sugar beets.
 

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farmlegend/wildbill
My turnip field looks like a mine field!
Ed Spin
What would you attribute to my field (turnips) and rape being totally slammed for the last few months and all the other guys not having much action it theirs? I have always thought it was because I have "few" farmers in my area that keep the soil up
(one of them had a ten acre field of mine for 8 years, I have first hand knowlege of how he treats free land!) Still building up the soil alittle at a time. Anyway what would you think, I always thought the deer know what they are eating and what they need to survive? You would think they would be hitting a crop that is available that may provide more nutients to them then the corn?
I need to get anouther scanner tomarro and get a few pics up.
Thanks Ed
Brokenarrow
 

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farmlegend/Wildbill
Just re-read my post, dont mis-interpret it, I am not saying you are not keeping up your soil, I am asking if the farmers around you guys are keeping up their soil/land and the farmers by me are not.;)
 

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This is my turnip plot in late oct. I will post the latest picture in 2 days when I get it back.

 
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