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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

Well, I tore into the boat and finally got the opportunity and time to pull the floor from my fiberglass boat. I was cleaning up the mess when I probed around the foam, and like a sponge, it was holding water. Question is this: Do I remove the foam and replace, or is there a way to dry it out? I think I'm going to have to replace it but was wondering if anyone knew something I don't. I seen somewhere about drilling a drain hole into the stringer to drain it, then filling the hole with silicone, but drilling holes in stringers sounds scary (Open to rot).

And part two to this question: Where is the best place to buy this stuff? I know it's a two-part Urethane foam that expands, but I'm curious if anyone has the low-down on where to get it at a savings? And I'm wondering how much I should buy, 2qt, 2gl ? It's an 18.5ft Bayliner, is there a way I can go about guestimating? I know they give a yield of x amount of cu ft, but how can I measure it in my boat when the hull is coming down diagonally? Dude, I mean, it looks like I'll be dropping like $500 on foam, does this sound about right?

Thanks for the help guys, I'll post some pics of my monstrousity. FYI - Don't buy a Bayliner. The workmanship quality is very poor. It appears they build the boat with the intentions of making it rot. Very disappointed, but I was young and dumb, and the cheap price tag got me.
 

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One option you might consider is finding an insulation contractor in your area. Some of them have the spray urethane foam for insulating walls and ceilings and it does a great job. It wouldn't be worth having them come to your home for that tiny of a job but maybe they would be working close and you could take the boat to them on a job site and I'll bet they can redo the foam in a few seconds. You may need to do the shaving yourself after it is dry but it sure would save a lot of head ache. If I am not mistaken, once foam starts to break down and become water logged it is about worthless. I am not 100% positive but I would never want to trust it if it were my boat. Second, while the foam is out of it you might try strapping it to the trailer and then float it to see if there are any serious leaks before you refoam it. Rick
 

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Before you spend a penny you'll have to find where the water is coming in from..................if not all work will be for naught..
 

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res said:
One option you might consider is finding an insulation contractor in your area. Some of them have the spray urethane foam for insulating walls and ceilings and it does a great job. It wouldn't be worth having them come to your home for that tiny of a job but maybe they would be working close and you could take the boat to them on a job site and I'll bet they can redo the foam in a few seconds. You may need to do the shaving yourself after it is dry but it sure would save a lot of head ache. If I am not mistaken, once foam starts to break down and become water logged it is about worthless. I am not 100% positive but I would never want to trust it if it were my boat. Second, while the foam is out of it you might try strapping it to the trailer and then float it to see if there are any serious leaks before you refoam it. Rick
:yeahthat: also you may check with home depot or lowes and see if they rent an insulation machine. i know they have the ones for blowing in loose insulation but im not sure about the foam ones. when you put the new wood down make sure you use epoxy resin to coat it if you want it to last.
 

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Remove all of the foam... You'll most likely be dead before it is totally dry... you want to replace it with a closed cell foam which won't hold moisture.

Also, whenever you drill or cut a hole... reseal the face with some fiberglass resin so that water intrusion does not occur into the wood or what not (ie stringers, deck coring, etc).
 

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I did a repair on a Bayliner that had the same problem you are describing. I’m not sure which model you have, but for some reason the Center Consoles suffered from this problem. The symptom of this problem is the boat plows through the water until weight is shifted forward and it can come down on plane.

It sounds like you have completed the first step and that is cutting open the floor. The next step is you do have to remove ALL the foam from the hull. It will not dry out. I made a couple of special tools to accomplish this. They resemble crowbars, but are sharp on the hook and used for reaching in and pulling out wet foam. It’s a heck of a job, but it can be done. The next step is to inspect the inside floor of the hull for cracks and water intrusion. Next you’ll need to cut drain holes through the stringers (flush with the bottom of the hull) that will empty water from the outboard compartments into the center compartment. This is what caused the problem in the first place. After I cut these holes, I inserted a piece of 3/4” pvc pipe by 2" long, making sure to coat it completely with epoxy so as to seal the fresh wood in the stringer in the hole that was drilled.

After that, I inspected and repaired the wire/cable chase that runs from the stern to the console. This was a cardboard tube and it suffered some damage and made pulling wires difficult. Make sure yours is clear because once the foam is applied, it will be buried.

The next step was to replace the foam. I used a two part closed cell foam. Be careful here. You’ll need to fill areas that were not open when you cut the floor open so when you put the product in, make sure there is room for expansion. When I filled the center section, I cut a piece of cardboard to lay above the centerline so as not to fill this section right to the floor. You need to leave room for the water to flow. I tried to attach a diagram below. You'll need to click on the link and then click on the diagram. If it doesn't work, email me and I'll send it to you.

View attachment hull.doc
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The water was coming from the top of the floor, which rotted a hole in one section. I left the boat at a dock for a week and it rained cats and dogs, filling up the boat above floor level. Right now I'm in the process of digging out the foam, and have ordered some new foam (2lb. density). I've also read that you lay the floor first and then drill (2) 1" holes in each foam "Compartment", and fill that way. I have the floor sections removed, and new ones cut, just trying to dry them out some more so I can coat them with epoxy resin. Boy, I'll tell ya, this project actually went pretty smooth! Now another question/debate, do I use mating along the edges, or should I use the "Tiger Hair" (Resin with shredded glass)? I think they used the Tiger Hair, but that's usually used as a filler.
 

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West marine and boaters world both have the flotation foam.
Be carefull if you go to an insulation guy. Some of their foam is closed cell and some is open cell. Also, you need to know the flotation rating of the foam, ie how many pounds it will float per cubic foot of foam. The insulation guys may not know that number.

I'd buy the stuff that is used as flotation for boats and skip the insulation guy, but that's just me.
 

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Landsend: If you have any questions regarding fiberglass repairs, send me an email. I'll be happy to answer them. I build/repair boats as a sideline.

John
 

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Discussion Starter #12
swampbuck said:
putting the floor in first is the preffered method, BUT YOU BETTER KNOW EXACTLY HOW MUCH FOAM TO PUT IN THAT CAVITY.
It says you can "layer" it, and it will bond with each layer. That appears to be the only logical way of doing it. I read, you make (2)-1" holes and fill them, and when it expands, it will come out of the holes.

But thanks for the heads up
 
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