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This is an extremely new hunter question, sorry in advance. I've been doing some searching and poking around and can't seem to find a good answer to exactly what to look for regarding whitetail feeding areas in areas without agriculture or man made food plots specific to Michigan.

During my scouting trips this year I relied mostly on finding tracks, scat, and beds. As far as identifying specific feeding areas I'm having a lot of trouble. I have taken notice of areas with lots of acorns on the ground, young growth and that's about all I know to look for. Any tips or resources you would recommend?
 

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This is an extremely new hunter question, sorry in advance. I've been doing some searching and poking around and can't seem to find a good answer to exactly what to look for regarding whitetail feeding areas in areas without agriculture or man made food plots specific to Michigan.

During my scouting trips this year I relied mostly on finding tracks, scat, and beds. As far as identifying specific feeding areas I'm having a lot of trouble. I have taken notice of areas with lots of acorns on the ground, young growth and that's about all I know to look for. Any tips or resources you would recommend?
Both the younger browse and acorns are good observations on your part.

When deer runways/travel routes fan out at their ends , it is either in feeding or bedding areas.
There are exceptions ,but what you see at those fanning out areas will clue you.

Winter tracking helps notice random browse patterns of winter diets.

If you have good acorns (reds are often second choice but if the only ones they really matter) acorns should be a good draw....
 

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You're on the right track. Aside from the obviously mast trees of apples/crabapples, pears, acorns,etc...Autumn Olive berry's are often an overlooked early season food source and honey locust pods are often overlooked late season. I've seen both get hammered.

Overgrown weed fields are another place to look.

If you're lucky enough to kill a deer, I always cut open the stomach to examine the contents to determine what the preferred forage is currently.
 
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