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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On one of the properties I hunt, there is a small strip of 2-track dividing 2 crop fields. It's about 12 feet wide by about 200 yards. The farmer mentioned to me back over the summer that next year he just might turn it over and roll it into the existing crop fields as the 2-track has no functional purpose for him.
That little 2 track is valuable to me because it allows me to drive my truck right up to the woods when need be, and also provides a good walking path to the woods. If it were not there I would have to walk through crops to get to the woods (this is my only entry point to the woods) and if it were all corn it would pose an access problem to the woods.
Any estimate on what the agricultural crop value of this little strip is? Provided it's reasonable I would gladly pay the farmer to keep it as-is.

Here is a pic of what I am talking about. The strip of land in question is the red line:

 

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600 feet x 12 feet = 7200 square feet divided by 43,560 sq.ft per acre = 0.165 acres. x 125 bushels per acre(conservative estimate maximum yield could be 150 bu. per acre) =
20 bushels of corn X $3.50 = About $75 not including the costs of tilling and fertilizing.
 

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Yields are always at least somewhat reduced around field edges, paths, etc so there could be a little more economic impact than just adding the trace amount of extra acreage However, it's possible that his decision to eliminate the path may not be economic, but instead convenience. From a practical standpoint, it might just be a case of him not wanting to have to navigate equipment around obstructions that could be easily eliminated.
 

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From a practical standpoint, it might just be a case of him not wanting to have to navigate equipment around obstructions that could be easily eliminated.
x2

I'd offer to clean up the line so it's straight if necessary and pay him a few times what it's worth as cropland to keep his decision to say "yes" to you an easy one. ;-)
 

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To the farmer it is more like the nuisance factor in getting rid of the two track. He is there with the equipment anyway so why not plant it. Chances are unless you have to go through his yard to use the trail other people are using it too. So by planting it, he may see it as a cheap way of keeping people out without the hassle of putting a chain across the track.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
A friend of the family owns the property.
He leases the property to a local farmer, I have hunting permission from the owner. I have a good relationship with the farmer who leases it, he even lets me hunt his farm down the road.

I would also add that I feel the farmer has all the rights there and I always yield to him as he pays to use the land, I do not, and farming is his livelihood where I am out there for recreation.


Radiohead,
What are your arrangements or agreements with the farmer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You pretty much nailed it November Sunrise.
Talked to Farmer today when I stopped by his house to drop off the Venison from the Doe I got last week as my "thank you" and to wish he and his wife a Merry Christmas.
He did say he'd try to leave the rows a little wider than normal in that little strip of land so I can easily walk through them.

Yields are always at least somewhat reduced around field edges, paths, etc so there could be a little more economic impact than just adding the trace amount of extra acreage However, it's possible that his decision to eliminate the path may not be economic, but instead convenience. From a practical standpoint, it might just be a case of him not wanting to have to navigate equipment around obstructions that could be easily eliminated.
 
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