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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know what type of wood fairing blocks are made of? I have one that is in poor shape and I want to replace it. It almost looks like a cross between mahogany and cedar...:dizzy: And if you know what kind of wood it is, maybe you'll know where I can get some...

Neale aka LMF :fish:

And for those that read this thread and think..What is a fairing block? It is the wood that adapts a through hull transducer to the hull and gives it the angle to shoot straight to the bottom instead of shooting at the angle of the hull.
 

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I would try to find one outta plastic. You wouldn't have to ever replace it.
 

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We usually make them out of teak or mahogany. We dry fit it to make sure we got the right agle and then coat it with west systems epoxy. You might be able to find one made of plastic. We buy them sometimes from a company called Gemco. I will try and remember to grab thier number whn I go to the shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hey goose,

Were you ablr to locate that number?

LMF :fish:
 

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I noticed your post and am familar with the company your looking for they have lots of parts and easy to deal with,

Here is the number for the Gem Electric Co.
Hope this helps

Distrubutors for Airmar® and others speed, depth, and wind transducers.Activities:Supplier - Instruments, Monitors, Flowmeters, etc.
Lake City SC110 S. Acline Avenue, Lake City, SC 29560, USA Phone:+1 843 394 3565
Fax:+1 843 394 3736
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks dcal.....This is one of things slowing down the launch of the boat. The old one is iffy at best and I'd rather be safe then sorry....

Neale aka LMF :fish:
 

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Transducer Installation



It is extremely important that at the most critical depths the transducer is as perpendicular to the bottom as possible. This is usually navigating through shallow bars, channels or reefs, and choosing a good anchorage. Sailboats will normally be moving slowly and not heeled under these circumstances. The "dead rise" of the hull will angle the transducer affecting the accuracy of the unit. Therefore a "fairing block" is installed between the transducer and the hull to achieve the desired angle. Racing boats, both power and sail will want to flush mount the transducer, another installation problem we won't cover here.



There are several things to keep in mind when installing a transducer with a fairing block:

  • If you are using a wood (teak) block you can only use a bronze transducer. As the wood swells from immersion in water a plastic transducer housing will be overstressed and likely crack. If you must use a plastic transducer use plastic fairing blocks made from "starboard". It is not recommended to install plastic transducers in wood hulls for the same reasons.
  • You will need to order a transducer with an extra long neck to accommodate the thickness of the wood fairing blocks.
  • You will need an interior fairing block as well to accommodate the interior dead rise of the hull.
  • Pick a spot to mount the transducer that is as far forward as possible without encountering turbulence when underway at normal cruising speeds. The location must also be easily accessible from the inside as well.
  • Mount the exterior fairing block on the outside of the hull centered onto the small pilot hole you drilled to locate it's proper position. Small self taping screws can be used for this purpose. Don't forget the sealant between the fairing block and the hull. Now use your hole saw to drill the hole to fit the transducer. The fairing block will act as a drill guide keeping the hole at the proper angle.
  • Slide the transducer and cable into the hole applying sealant (5200 caulk is good) for a good seal. Carefully place a stick (with a sponge on top) between the ground and the transducer to keep pressure on the transducer face keeping it firm in the hole. Be careful not to damage the transducer face.
  • Inside the boat apply more sealant to the hull around the transducer and install the inside fairing block. Tighten the bronze ring nut as tight as you can until sealant starts to squish out from around the fairing block.. Do not wipe away extra sealant, leave a good bead around the hull to fairing block joint.

Now you are ready to liberally apply your anti-fouling paint. Be careful not to apply paint to the transducer face unless you have purchased special transducer anti-fouling paint. Metals in other paints may affect the signal and give unreliable results.
 

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Sorry I forgot to post it! That is the company I deal with on my thru-hulls and other select part's. Don't forget to use 5200 fast cure for the best results. Regular 5200 doesn't cure for several day's especially with humidity. Fast cure will cure under water if it had to. Good luck!
 
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