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Keep in mind I just started hunting last year...but I hear talk of fawns and yearlings. What's the difference? I assume fawns were born in the current year?
And how do you tell the difference between a doe and buck if there are no signs of antler growth yet, not even a button buck.

Thanks!
 

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And how do you tell the difference between a doe and buck if there are no signs of antler growth yet, not even a button buck.

Thanks!
Button bucks have a flat head where the antlers will grow and they have a baby face. Does will usually travel with fawns and other does. The matriarch doe will chase away button bucks and bachelor groups will split up this time of year.

If it's a lone 'doe' look real close. If it's facing you, look between the ear, if it walking away, look somewhere else :help:.
 

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Keep in mind I just started hunting last year...but I hear talk of fawns and yearlings. What's the difference? I assume fawns were born in the current year?
And how do you tell the difference between a doe and buck if there are no signs of antler growth yet, not even a button buck.

Thanks!
I don't know if this is correct or not, but what I have always been told was fawns have spots, yearlings don't. I do realize that they are the same but that is the way it was told to me. November Sunrise may be correct, but when they get to be a year old they are does and bucks to me.
 

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November is correct. Yearlings are not fawns. Fawns are young of that year...born in the spring and are 6 month old + or -. Yearlings are 18 month olds give or take. The terms tend to get tossed around as one and the same, but they are two distinct age classes. Button bucks are fawns, that 3 point is likely a yearling for example.
 

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I don't know if this is correct or not, but what I have always been told was fawns have spots, yearlings don't. I do realize that they are the same but that is the way it was told to me. November Sunrise may be correct, but when they get to be a year old they are does and bucks to me.
You were told wrong, and November Sunrise is correct.

A fawn is less than one year old. A yearling is past it's first birthday, but not yet two years old.
 

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Keep in mind I just started hunting last year...but I hear talk of fawns and yearlings. What's the difference? I assume fawns were born in the current year?
And how do you tell the difference between a doe and buck if there are no signs of antler growth yet, not even a button buck.

Thanks!
The difference between them is one year. ;)

A fawn is a deer in its first year.
A yearling is a deer in its second year.

It's just that simple.

Best Regards,
Byron :)
 

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To me a fawn and yearling are the same, thats what we always call deer born in the spring.
 

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The word actually has a meaning - check it out:
year·ling
Pronunciation: \ˈyir-liŋ, ˈyər-lən\
Function: noun
Date: 15th century

: one that is a year old: as a: an animal one year old or in the second year of its age
Fawns are not yearlings.

Best Regards,
Byron :)
 

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The difference between button bucks and doe fawns. Study the faces of the two, I always felt button bucks had shorter, kinda budgy look in the face and does had a longer more pointed look. The younger ones also taste alot better than older deer. Let the old breeder go and shoot nice fat 1.5 yr old.
 

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Fawn:1: a young deer ; especially : one still unweaned or retaining a distinctive baby coat.
Like I said "to me" but thanks for the meaning :).
 

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Well, considering I just took down a BB by mistake, and a fawn one at that...........here's a pic of my button buck......



Hope that pic showed up.
 

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Landsend, here is your picture.

 

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I agree, a fawn is the first year deer, a yearling is second year.

However, I can't call that year and a half year old 6 or 8 point a yearling, that to me is a young buck.
 
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