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This post is just for CWD testing information only.

1. How is a deer tested? Blood? Tissue? Tissue from intestines, brain, stomache..ect..?

2. Who can do testing? DNR, a University,Private firms Address.

3. How long is the turn around time for results? DO they mail it to you? Call you? Web site notification?

4. Can they test a live deer? Blood?

5. Can they test muscle tissue? (For someone who already has a deer processed and in the freezer)

6.Is there anything a hunter can "check" in the field that would tip him off to the possibility of a deer being "sick" other than a deer just stumbling around?

7. How much $ to have a sample tested?

Just facts on this post. List any other testing information. Thank you.
 

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This list comes from the CWD Alliance website.
www.cwd-info.org

I do not know if any of these will do tests for private individuals.


Resources : Testing Laboratories


The following Laboratories are certified by the United States Department of Agriculture to test deer and elk tissues for the presence of chronic wasting disease. While the tests are extremely accurate, the process does not constitute a meat certification program…a negative result does not guarantee that the animal was free of CWD.

Alabama Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
1001 Wire Road Auburn, AL 36830
334-844-4987 or 334-844-4987
www.vetmed.auburn.edu/

Arkansas Livestock and Poultry Commission
1 Natural Resources Drive Little Rock, AR 72205
501-907-2435 or 501-907-2250
www.arlpc.org/

California Animal Health and Food Safety Lab
105 West Central Ave San Bernadino, CA 92408
909-383-4287 x220 or FAX 909-884-5980
cahfs.ucdavis.edu/sanbernardino.html

California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory - University of California
West Health Science Drive UC Davis, Davis, CA 95616
530-752-7578
cahfs.ucdavis.edu/

Colorado State University Diagnostic Laboratory
300 W. Drake St. Ft.Collins, CO 80523
970-491-1281 or 970-491-6143
www.cvmbs.colostate.edu/dlab/

Connecticut Veterinary Diagnostic Lab
61 North Eagleville Rd Storrs, CT 06269-3089
860-486-5370 or 860-486-3740
www.canr.uconn.edu/patho/

Florida Department of Agriculture- Kissimmee Veterinary Diagnostic Lab
2700 North John Young Parkway Kissimmee, FL 34745
407-846-5200 or 407-846-5200 x241

Georgia- The University of Georgia- Athens Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
College of Veterinary Medicine Athens, GA 30602
706-542-5568
www.vet.uga.edu/erc/diagnostic/html/athens.html

Georgia- UAGA College of Veterinary Medicine
Southeastern Coop. Wildlife Disease Study Athens, GA 30602
706-542-1741 or 706-542-5565

Illinois Department of Agriculture-Centralia Animal Disease Diagnostic Lab
9732 Shattue Road Centralia, Il 62801
618-532-6701 or 618-532-6701
www.agr.state.il.us/AnimalHW/labs/centralialab.html

Illinois Department of Agriculture-Galesburg Animal Disease Lab
2100 S. Lake Storey Road Galesburg, IL 61401
309-344-2451
www.agr.state.il.us/AnimalHW/labs/galesburglab.html

Kansas Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
1800 Denison, Kansas State University Manhattan, KS 66506
785-532-5650
www.vet.ksu.edu/depts/dmp/service/index.htm

Michigan Department of Natural Resources' Wildlife Disease Laboratory
4125 Beaumont Road Room 250 Lansing, MI 48910-8106
517-336-5030

Michigan State University- Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health
Michigan State University 4125 Beaumont Road, Room 122 Lansing, MI 48910-8104
517-353-0635
www.dcpah.msu.edu/

Minnesota- University of Minnesota Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
1333 Gortner Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108
612-625-8780 or 800-605-8787
www.ahc.umn.edu/ahc_content/colleges/new_vet_med/Veterinary_Diagnostic_Lab/

National Veterinary Services Laboratory
P.O. Box 844 Ames, IA 50010
515-239-8556
www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nvsl/index.htm

Nebraska- University of Nebraska Veterinary Diagnostic Center
University of Nebraska - Lincoln Fair Street and East Campus Loop Lincoln, NE 68583-0907
402-472-9416
www.vbms.unl.edu/nvdls.shtml

New York State Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory at Cornell University
Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory College of Veterinary Medicine Cornell University Upper Tower Rd Ithaca, NY 14853
607-253-3900
www.diaglab.vet.cornell.edu/dl_home.html

Ohio Department of Agriculture - Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory
8995 East Main St. Reynoldsburg, OH 43068-3399
614-728-6220
www.ohioagriculture.gov/pubs/divs/anim/curr/index.asp

Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory
2305 North Cameron Street Harrisburg, PA 17110-9449
717-787-8808

Pennsylvania- University of Pennsylvania Lab of Large Animal Pathology & Toxicology
New Bolton Center, 382 West Street Rd. Kennett Square, PA 19348-1692
610-444-5800, ext. 6232 or 610-444-5800, ext. 6385

Purdue University- Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory
1175 ADDL West Lafayette, IN 47907-1175
765-494-7456 or 765-494-7480
www.addl.purdue.edu/

South Dakota Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Laboratory
Box 2175, North Campus Drive South Dakota State University Brookings SD 57007-1396
605-688-5171
vetsci.sdstate.edu/

Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory
Texas A & M University 1 Sippel Rd. College Station, TX 77843
979-845-3414 or 888-646-5623
tvmdlweb.tamu.edu/

Texas Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory
Texas A & M University 6610 Amarillo Blvd West Amarillo, TX 79106
806-353-7478
tvmdlweb.tamu.edu/

Utah Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
950 East 1400 North Logan, UT 84322-5700
435-797-1895

Wisconsin Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
6101 Mineral Point Rd. Madison WI 53705-4494
608-262-5432 or 800-608-8387
www.wvdl.wisc.edu/

Wyoming State Veterinary Laboratory
1174 Snowy Range Road Laramie, Wyoming 82070
307-742-6638 or 800-442-8331
wyovet.uwyo.edu/

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This post is just for CWD testing information only.

1. How is a deer tested? Blood? Tissue? Tissue from intestines, brain, stomache..ect..?

2. Who can do testing? DNR, a University,Private firms Address.

3. How long is the turn around time for results? DO they mail it to you? Call you? Web site notification?

4. Can they test a live deer? Blood?

5. Can they test muscle tissue? (For someone who already has a deer processed and in the freezer)

6.Is there anything a hunter can "check" in the field that would tip him off to the possibility of a deer being "sick" other than a deer just stumbling around?

7. How much $ to have a sample tested?

Just facts on this post. List any other testing information. Thank you.
1. The most cost effective is brain or lymph node matter

2. Most likely, MI is not set up to test so your tests will be sent off to perhaps Ames Iowa or another location.

3. The testing will most likely take a month or more. Your state agency will be contacted and they will in turn contact you.

4. yes but not likely. Brain and lymph tissue is the best medium to test.

5. I suppose but good luck finding someone that will

6. Nope

7. Massive, statewide testing can cost as little as $15 a deer but singular tests done (if you can even find a lab) would run over $100
 

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LIVE TESTING rectal mucosa sampling in CWD surveillance


Greetings Michigan Hunters,

I thought I might add a few links for those that might find some interest in some old data, and new data on TSE transmission, tissue infectivity, and feed plots. also, I wonder why the new live rectal lymphoid tissue testing for CWD is NOT being used in Michigan, or is it ??? in the game farm industry it would be fairly easy, and even in the wild, if you are going to shoot 300 deer to test, why not dart them, then live test them, if not positive, tag as tested and negative, then release. a process of elimination of sorts, for now, you would have to retest in years down the road to make sure they stayed negative. just pondering out loud here. ...terry


LIVE TESTING

Adaptation and evaluation of a rapid test for the diagnosis of sheep scrapie in samples of rectal mucosa Lorenzo González1, Robert Horton, Drew Ramsay, Reet Toomik, Valerie Leathers, Quentin Tonelli, Mark P. Dagleish, Martin Jeffrey and Linda Terry Correspondence: 1Corresponding Author: Lorenzo González, Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, PENICUIK, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK, e-mail: [email protected]

In recent publications, it was shown that disease-associated prion protein (PrPd) accumulates in the lymphoid tissue of the rectal mucosa of a high proportion of scrapie-infected sheep at clinical and preclinical stages, regardless of several host factors; PrPd can also be detected in biopsy specimens of rectal mucosa, with an increased probability proportional to age or incubation period and with an efficiency almost identical to that of tonsil biopsies. Rectal biopsies have the advantages of providing higher numbers of lymphoid follicles and of being simpler to perform, which makes them suitable for scrapie screening in the field. In biopsy samples, PrPd could be demonstrated by immunohistochemical (IHC) and Western immunoblotting methods, and the purpose of the present study was to optimize and evaluate a "rapid test" for the diagnosis of scrapie in rectal biopsy samples. The HerdChek CWD (chronic wasting disease) antigen EIA (enzyme immunoassay) test was chosen and, once optimized, provided specificity and sensitivity figures of 99.2% and 93.5%, respectively, compared with IHC results in the same samples obtained at a postmortem. The sensitivity of the assay increased from 82.1%, when a single rectal mucosa sample was tested to 99.4% for those sheep in which 3 or more samples were analyzed. Similarly, sensitivity values of the HerdChek CWD antigen EIA test on biopsy samples increased from 95% to 100% for sheep subjected to 1 or 2 sequential biopsies 4 months apart, respectively. Thus, a preclinical diagnosis of scrapie in live sheep can be achieved by a combination of a simple sampling procedure, which can be repeated several times with no detrimental effect for the animals, and a rapid and efficient laboratory method.

http://jvdi.org/cgi/content/abstract/20/2/203

Detection of PrPCWD in postmortem rectal lymphoid tissues in Rocky mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) infected with chronic wasting disease Terry R. Spraker1, Thomas L. Gidlewski, Aru Balachandran, Kurt C. VerCauteren, Lynn Creekmore and Randy D. Munger

Correspondence: 1Corresponding Author: Terry R Spraker, Colorado State University Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, 300 W Drake Rd, Fort Collins, CO 80526, e-mail: [email protected]

Preclinical diagnostic tests for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies have been described for mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), using biopsy tissues of palatine tonsil, and for sheep, using lymphoid tissues from palatine tonsil, third eyelid, and rectal mucosa. The utility of examining the rectal mucosal lymphoid tissues to detect chronic wasting disease (CWD) was investigated in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), a species for which there is not a live-animal diagnostic test. Postmortem rectal mucosal sections were examined from 308 elk from two privately owned herds that were depopulated. The results of the postmortem rectal mucosal sections were compared to immunohistochemical staining of the brainstem, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, and palatine tonsil. Seven elk were found positive using the brainstem (dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve), retropharyngeal lymph nodes, and palatine tonsil. Six of these elk were also found positive using postmortem rectal mucosal sections. The remaining 301 elk in which CWD-associated abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPCWD) was not detected in the brainstem and cranial lymphoid tissues were also found to be free of PrPCWD when postmortem rectal mucosal sections were examined. The use of rectal mucosal lymphoid tissues may be suitable for a live-animal diagnostic test as part of an integrated management strategy to limit CWD in elk.

http://jvdi.org/cgi/content/abstract/18/6/553

PrPCWD in rectal lymphoid tissue of deer (Odocoileus spp.) Lisa L. Wolfe1, Terry R. Spraker2, Lorenzo González3, Mark P. Dagleish4, Tracey M. Sirochman1,5, Jeremy C. Brown6, Martin Jeffrey3 and Michael W. Miller1

1 Colorado Division of Wildlife, Wildlife Research Center, 317 West Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO 80526-2097, USA 2 Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA 3 Veterinary Laboratories Agency – Lasswade, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik EH26 0PZ, UK 4 Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik EH26 0PZ, UK 5 Department of Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071, USA 6 Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Wyoming, 1174 Snowy Range Road, Laramie, WY 82070, USA

Correspondence Lisa L. Wolfe [email protected]

The utility of rectal lymphoid tissue sampling for the diagnosis of chronic wasting disease (CWD) infections in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was evaluated. CWD-associated prion protein (PrPCWD) deposits were observed in the rectal mucosa from 19 orally inoculated mule deer by 381 days post-inoculation (p.i.); similarly, 45 out of 50 naturally infected mule deer had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa. In orally inoculated white-tailed deer, the presence of glycine (G) or serine (S) at codon 96 of the native PrP (denoted 96GG, 96GS or 96SS) appeared to influence the temporal patterns of PrPCWD deposition: nine out of 11 infected 96GG individuals had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa by 342 days p.i., whereas only three out of seven infected 96GS individuals had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa by 381 days p.i. and none of three 96SS individuals had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa by 751 days p.i. These findings support further evaluation of rectal mucosa sampling in CWD surveillance.

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/7/2078

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/full/88/7/2078



April 2, 2008 New Scrapie Live-Animal Test Approved On Jan. 11, 2008, Veterinary Services (VS), a unit within the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, approved a new live-animal test for detecting scrapie in sheep and goats. Similar to the currently used third eyelid test, the test involves collecting lymphoid tissue. The new test, however, uses rectal mucosa biopsy, as opposed to third eyelid biopsy. Both tests can be conducted on live animals using local anesthetic.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/animal_health/content/printable_version/sa_scrapies08.pdf




2007

animals were tested in 2007 with the identification and removal of positive elk from infected herds. Eighty percent of the positive animals in a highly infected white-tailed deer herd were identified with *** rectal biopsy. The lower incidence of CWD in most infected elk herds complicates the evaluation of this test in elk. It appears that in deer, rectal lymphoid tissue becomes positive later than lymphoid tissue of the head suggesting that early cases may be missed with rectal biopsy. Positive rectal biopsy is indicative of disease but a negative rectal biopsy test does not rule out CWD in an individual or herd.

http://www.usaha.org/committees/reports/2007/report-cwal-2007.pdf


Thursday, August 28, 2008 CWD TISSUE INFECTIVITY brain, lymph node, blood, urine, feces, antler velvet and muscle http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-tissue-infectivity-brain-lymph-node.html

Thursday, August 28, 2008

cwd, feeding, and baiting piles

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-feeding-and-baiting-piles.html

HAVE ANOTHER GLASS OF CWD PRIONS COURTESY Dane County Wisconsin Mike DiMaggio, solid waste manager

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/have-another-glass-of-cwd-prions.html

It was difficult to gain a clear account of incidence and temporal sequence of events (-this presumably is data awaiting publication - see below) but during the period 1981-1984, 10-15 cases occurred at the Sybille facility.

The moribidity amongst mule deer in the facilities ie. those of the natural potentially exposed group has been about 90% with 100% mortality.

snip...

Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

tss
 

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I thought i should post this here. did not want to start another thread because did not think it would get read, and may not here, but everyone of you should read this, read all of it, from start to finish, then read the book by the Faillace's, then some of you might see what has been going on for some time. take it with how ever many grains of salt you wish.

didn't figure nobody would be interested in the full text here, so if there is anyone interested (and this could have very well been any of you), the rest of my post is here. i wasted 6 frriggen years with this.......


MAD SHEEP OF MAD RIVER VALLEY FOIA DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY DUE TO AN ATYPICAL TSE OF FOREIGN ORIGIN


-------------------- [email protected] --------------------


September 1, 2008


Greetings again BSE-L members,

I had a pleasant surprise this past Saturday. I got an unexpected package from O.I.G. on my old F.O.I.A. request, of the final test results of the infamous mad sheep of mad river valley. IF you all remember, back on Thu, 24 Apr 2008 15:00:20 -0500 I wrote ;



Greetings,


With great disgust, I must report, that after years and years of wrangling over the infamous mad sheep of mad river valley, I have failed in getting an official answer via FOIA on the outcome of the TSE testing of those imported Belgium sheep. The USA Government refuses to tell the public, exactly what the testing outcome was, and in doing so, shows just how corrupt this administration has been. and the excuse given in their answer to my final appeal, which they have now officially denied, was bizarre to say the least ;

"I am denying your FOIA appeal. This is the final agency decision. You may seek judicial review of this decision in the United States district court for the judicial district in which you reside or have your principal place of business or in the District of Columbia, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. & 552(a)(4)(B)."

FOIA OF DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL T.S.E. (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES [Docket No. 00-072-1] ...snip...end...TSS


NOW, out of the wild blue, AFTER them telling me they denied my FOIA appeal for the final time, any further action would have to be judicial review in the United States district court, I get 25+ pages, a lot of redacted names, etc, but this is the first time they sent me anything about this in the 6 years of waiting for my FOIA request. IT will take me a long time to get this online due to the fact you cannot hardly read it, very poor quality and eligibility of text. BUT, the just of it is, somebody (REDACTED) screwed those tests up. I will work to get all the data online next week or so, but it is odd how much they were concerned for human and animal health from an atypical scrapie of foreign origin back then, but yet when we document it here in the USA, you don't hear a word about it. it's a completely different story.


IN SHORT ;



August 15, 2000

OIG case # NY-3399-56 REDACTED, VT

''Enclosed is OIG's notification that they have scheduled an investigation of the following individual. REDACTED is alleged to have provided possibly inaccurate test results involving diseased sheep.
However, because the results were determined to be inconclusive, no actual violation was actually committed.''


snip...


[only bush et al could have interpreted it that way. don't all criminals wish this is the way the system worked. ...tss]

JULY, 28, 2000

Case Opening Memorandum


snip...


An investigation regarding the subject identified below will be conduced and a report submitted at the conclusion of the investigation. If you have or should later receive additional information concerning this matter, please forward it to this office.

If you believe that administrative action should be taken before all criminal and other legal matters are completed, please coordinate that action with this office in order not to jeopardize the ongoing investigation.

The fact that this subject is under investigation should not be discussed with anyone who does not have a need to know and all inquiries on the investigation should be referred to the office of Inspector General.


snip...end


FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY FEBRUARY 7, 2002

SUBJECT OIG CASE NY-3399-56 REDACTED VT HEALTH/SANITATION VIOLATION

TO: William Buisch, Regional Director Eastern Region, VS Raleigh, NC


Enclosed is the official investigation report on REDACTED. If you will recall, REDACTED is alleged to have provided possible inaccurate test results involving diseased sheep.

OIG is closing their file upon issuance of the Report of Investigation (copy enclosed). We are, therefore, also closing our case file.


REDACTED


Resource Management Systems and Evaluation Staff

Enclosure

cc:

REDACTED IES, Riverdale, MD (w/cy of incoming)

APHIS:RMSES: REDACTED 2/7/02 "NY-3399-56-REDACTED Closure''

END...TSS



NOW, the question is, who screwed those test up, and was it done on purpose, just to cover someone's ass for letting those sheep in here in the first place ???

WHICH tests were compromised, one of them, all of them, and, can we trust the outcome of any of these test under the circumstances here ???

i.e.

"It is significant that four of the sheep which first tested positive on REDACTED Western blot tests, thereby providing the type of confirmation the plaintiffs argue is lacking on the current record."

UNDER what circumstances were these test compromised ???

MY basic, simple question, was not answered in layman term, i.e. exactly what strain of TSE did those sheep have ???

IS this the best we can do ???


>>>"REDACTED is alleged to have provided possibly inaccurate test results involving diseased sheep. However, because the results were determined to be inconclusive, no actual violation was actually committed.''<<<



kinda reminds me of ;


Owner and Corporation Plead Guilty to Defrauding Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) Surveillance Program

An Arizona meat processing company and its owner pled guilty in February 2007 to charges of theft of Government funds, mail fraud, and wire fraud. The owner and his company defrauded the BSE Surveillance Program when they falsified BSE Surveillance Data Collection Forms and then submitted payment requests to USDA for the services. In addition to the targeted sample population (those cattle that were more than 30 months old or had other risk factors for BSE), the owner submitted to USDA, or caused to be submitted, BSE obex (brain stem) samples from healthy USDA-inspected cattle. As a result, the owner fraudulently received approximately $390,000. Sentencing is scheduled for May 2007.

snip...

Topics that will be covered in ongoing or planned reviews under Goal 1 include:

soundness of BSE maintenance sampling (APHIS),

implementation of Performance-Based Inspection System enhancements for specified risk material (SRM) violations and improved inspection controls over SRMs (FSIS and APHIS),

snip...

The findings and recommendations from these efforts will be covered in future semiannual reports as the relevant audits and investigations are completed.


4 USDA OIG SEMIANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS FY 2007 1st Half

http://www.usda.gov/oig/webdocs/sarc070619.pdf


OR ;


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Statement May 4, 2004 Media Inquiries: 301-827-6242 Consumer Inquiries: 888-INFO-FDA

Statement on Texas Cow With Central Nervous System Symptoms On Friday, April 30 th , the Food and Drug Administration learned that a cow with central nervous system symptoms had been killed and shipped to a processor for rendering into animal protein for use in animal feed.

FDA, which is responsible for the safety of animal feed, immediately began an investigation. On Friday and throughout the weekend, FDA investigators inspected the slaughterhouse, the rendering facility, the farm where the animal came from, and the processor that initially received the cow from the slaughterhouse.

FDA's investigation showed that the animal in question had already been rendered into "meat and bone meal" (a type of protein animal feed). Over the weekend FDA was able to track down all the implicated material. That material is being held by the firm, which is cooperating fully with FDA.

Cattle with central nervous system symptoms are of particular interest because cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy or BSE, also known as "mad cow disease," can exhibit such symptoms. In this case, there is no way now to test for BSE. But even if the cow had BSE, FDA's animal feed rule would prohibit the feeding of its rendered protein to other ruminant animals (e.g., cows, goats, sheep, bison).


http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/news/2004/new01061.html


OR ;


BESIDES the Texas mad cow that sat on the shelf for 7+ months before the Honorable Phyllis Fong of the OIG finally did the end around Johanns et al and finally had Weybridge bring that negative cow back from the dead to finally being a confirmed mad cow (hint, hint, getting MRR implemented first), was this simply another bumbling of BSE protocol, or just same old same old;

Jim Rogers (202) 690-4755

USDA Press Office (202) 720-4623

Statement by Chief Veterinary Medical Officer John Clifford Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Regarding Non-Definitive BSE Test Results July 27, 2005


snip...


Our laboratory ran the IHC test on the sample and received non-definitive results that suggest the need for further testing. As we have previously experienced, it is possible for an IHC test to yield differing results depending on the "slice" of tissue that is tested. Therefore, scientists at our laboratory and at Weybridge will run the IHC test on additional "slices" of tissue from this animal to determine whether or not it was infected with BSE. We will announce results as soon as they are compiled, which we expect to occur by next week.

I would note that the sample was taken in April, at which time the protocols allowed for a preservative to be used (protocols changed in June 2005). The sample was not submitted to us until last week, because the veterinarian set aside the sample after preserving it and simply forgot to send it in. On that point, I would like to emphasize that while that time lag is not optimal, it has no implications in terms of the risk to human health. The carcass of this animal was destroyed, therefore there is absolutely no risk to human or animal health from this animal.


snip...


http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/news/2005/07/bsestatement_vs.html




snip... please see full text ;

http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2008/06/mad-cows-and-computer-models-us.html


Wednesday, August 20, 2008

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Mad Cow Disease typical and atypical strains, was there a cover-up ?

August 20, 2008



http://bse-atypical.blogspot.com/2008/08/bovine-spongiform-encephalopathy-mad.html


http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/2007/10/bse-base-mad-cow-testing-texas-usa-and.html


EXACTLY WHAT are they afraid of by sound testing ???

http://madcowtesting.blogspot.com/


EXACTLY WHAT are these people capable of doing ???


JUST HOW FAR will they go ???



Mad Sheep The True Story Behind the USDA, War on a Family Farm

Linda Faillace

The page-turning account of a government cover-up, corporate greed, and a courageous family, fight to save their farm.

http://www.chelseagreen.com/2006/items/madsheep


got to read this months ago, and it is deeply disturbing how the feds handled this from the very beginning, and to this day we do not know the results of the mouse bio-assays, and what those sheep actually had. i don't necessarily agree with the TSE science in this book, but the book is a must read if your interested at all in human and animal TSEs. ...TSS Submitted by flounder on Thu, 09/07/2006 - 9:43pm.

http://www.vtcommons.org/blog/2006/08/28/book-release-party-linda-faillaces-mad-sheep



to be continued. ...TSS




SOME HISTORY ON THIS ;



snip....



Monday, September 1, 2008
RE-FOIA OF DECLARATION OF EXTRAORDINARY EMERGENCY BECAUSE OF AN ATYPICAL T.S.E. (PRION DISEASE) OF FOREIGN ORIGIN IN THE UNITED STATES [No. 00-072-1]
September 1, 2008



http://foiamadsheepmadrivervalley.blogspot.com/2008/09/re-foia-of-declaration-of-extraordinary.html



TSS
 

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a bit more data on this new live rectal lymphoid tissue testing for CWD ;


Title: Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin captive white-tailed deer farm

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal Publication Acceptance Date: May 5, 2008 Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary:

Chronic wasting disease is a fatal disease of deer and elk. Clinical signs, including weight loss, frequent urination, excessive thirst, and changes in behavior and gait, have been reported in mule deer and elk with this disorder. Clinical signs in captive white tailed deer are less well understood. In a previous study, a captive facility housed 200 deer, of which half were positive for the disease with no clinical signs reported. In this study, we examined 78 white tailed deer from a captive facility with a history of chronic wasting disease and no animals with clinical signs. Examination of the brain and lymph nodes demonstrated that the abnormal prion protein, a marker for disease, was observed in 60 of the deer. Biopsy of the rectal mucosa, a test that can be performed on live deer, detected 83% of the infected animals. The prion genetics of the deer was strongly linked to the rate of infection and to disease progression. The results demonstrate that clinical signs are a poor indicator of the disease in captive white tailed deer and that routine testing of live deer and comprehensive necropsy surveillance may be needed to identify infected herds. Technical Abstract: Chronic wasting disease CWD is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of deer and elk in North America. All diseases in this family are characterized by long preclinical incubation periods following by a relatively short clinical course. Endpoint disease is characterized by extensive deposits of aggregates of the abnormal prion protein in the central nervous system,. In deer, the abnormal prion proteins accumulate in some peripheral lymphoid tissues early in disease and are therefore suitable for antemortem and preclinical postmortem diagnostics and for determining disease progression in infected deer. In this study, a herd of deer with previous CWD diagnoses was depopulated. No clinical suspects were identified at that time. Examination of the brain and nodes demonstrated that 79% of the deer were infected. Of the deer with abnormal prion in the peripheral lymphoid system, the retropharyngeal lymph node was the most reliable diagnostic tissue. Biopsy of the rectal mucosal tissue, a site readily sampled in the restrained or chemically immobilized deer, provided an accurate diagnosis in 83% of the infected deer. The retina in the eye of the deer was positive only in late stage cases. This study demonstrated that clinical signs are a poor indicator of disease, supports the use of the retropharyngeal lymph node as the most appropriate postmortem sample, and supports a further evaluation of the rectal mucosal tissue biopsy as an antemortem test on a herd basis

http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publications.htm?SEQ_NO_115=218153

July 15, 2008

Live CWD test in elk shows promise

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Researchers in May completed their third year of evaluating and validating the first live rectal-tissue biopsy method for detecting chronic wasting disease in captive and wild elk.

More than 1,500 biopsy specimens have been collected from captive elk in Colorado, 15 of which the new method found to test positive for CWD. Compared with proven postmortem diagnostic tests, the new test appears to be nearly as accurate, according to the Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, which is conducting the research along with the Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory.

"Until now, there was no practical live test for CWD in elk," said research wildlife biologist Kurt VerCauteren, PhD, with APHIS' Wildlife Services National Wildlife Research Center. "With this technique we can detect CWD in animals not showing any signs of the disease and, thus, remove them so they are not left to infect other individuals and further contaminate the environment."

The disease has been reported in captive and free-ranging mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, and moose. CWD has been a devastating disease to the captive elk industry. An estimated 12,000 to 14,000 captive elk have been killed in the western United States and Canada in the past seven to eight years to control CWD. Several thousand free-ranging mule deer, white-tailed deer and elk also have been killed in attempts to reduce the disease in the wild.

"The use of this new live test in the initial screening, surveillance, and monitoring of CWD will greatly aid in the management and control of the disease in the wild, as well as in captive settings," Dr. VerCauteren said.

http://www.avma.org/onlnews/javma/jul08/080715t.asp

Gail Keirn (970) 266-6007 Carol Bannerman (301) 734-6464

USDA AND COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY RESEARCHERS DEVELOP FIRST LIVE TEST FOR CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN ELK

FORT COLLINS, Colo., May 30, 2008--Researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Colorado State University (CSU) recently completed their third year of evaluating and validating the first live rectal-tissue biopsy method for detecting chronic wasting disease (CWD) in captive and wild elk. To date, researchers have collected over 1,500 biopsies from captive elk in Colorado and used the technique to find 15 elk that were positive for CWD. As compared to proven post-mortem diagnostic tests, this live test appears to be nearly as accurate.

“The key advantage to the rectal biopsy test is that it can be performed on live animals. Until now, there was no practical live test for CWD in elk,” said research wildlife biologist Dr. Kurt VerCauteren with APHIS’ Wildlife Services (WS) National Wildlife Research Center (NWRC). “With this technique we can detect CWD in animals not showing any signs of the disease and, thus, remove them so they are not left to infect other individuals and further contaminate the environment.”

The research is a collaborative effort between APHIS’ WS and Veterinary Services programs, the Agricultural Research Service, and the Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory within the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

The majority of the research was conducted on the Velvet Ridge Elk Ranch, owned by Dennis and Stephanie White, near Fort Collins, Colo. In 2002, an elk on the ranch was confirmed to have CWD and since that time the Whites have worked closely with NWRC and other collaborators to learn more about CWD and to develop methods to manage it in captive and wild settings.

“The use of this new live test in the initial screening, surveillance and monitoring of CWD will greatly aid in the management and control of the disease in the wild, as well as in captive settings,” said VerCauteren.

CWD is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy whereby abnormal proteins accumulate in the central nervous and lymphatic systems of infected animals causing a degenerative lack of control and a “wasting-away” death. Currently, there is no cure for CWD.

CWD has been reported in captive and free-ranging mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk and moose. CWD has been a devastating disease to the captive elk industry. An estimated 12,000-14,000 captive elk have been killed in the western United States and Canada in the past 7-8 years to control CWD. Several thousand free-ranging mule deer, white-tailed deer and elk also have been killed in attempts to reduce the disease in the wild.

The NWRC is the research arm of USDA’s WS program. It is the federal institution devoted to resolving problems caused by the interaction of wild animals and society. The center applies scientific expertise to the development of practical methods to resolve these problems and to maintain the quality of the environments shared with wildlife. To learn more about NWRC, visit its Web site at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage/nwrc/.

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Note to Reporters: USDA news releases, program announcements and media advisories are available on the Internet. Go to the APHIS news release page at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/lpa/news/press.html. Also, anyone with an e-mail address can sign up to receive APHIS press releases automatically. Send an e-mail message to [email protected] and leave the subject blank. In the message type subscribe press_releases.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/content/2008/05/cwdelktst.shtml

TSS



LIVE TESTING rectal mucosa sampling in CWD surveillance


Greetings Michigan Hunters,

I thought I might add a few links for those that might find some interest in some old data, and new data on TSE transmission, tissue infectivity, and feed plots. also, I wonder why the new live rectal lymphoid tissue testing for CWD is NOT being used in Michigan, or is it ??? in the game farm industry it would be fairly easy, and even in the wild, if you are going to shoot 300 deer to test, why not dart them, then live test them, if not positive, tag as tested and negative, then release. a process of elimination of sorts, for now, you would have to retest in years down the road to make sure they stayed negative. just pondering out loud here. ...terry


LIVE TESTING

Adaptation and evaluation of a rapid test for the diagnosis of sheep scrapie in samples of rectal mucosa Lorenzo González1, Robert Horton, Drew Ramsay, Reet Toomik, Valerie Leathers, Quentin Tonelli, Mark P. Dagleish, Martin Jeffrey and Linda Terry Correspondence: 1Corresponding Author: Lorenzo González, Veterinary Laboratories Agency, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, PENICUIK, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK, e-mail: [email protected]

In recent publications, it was shown that disease-associated prion protein (PrPd) accumulates in the lymphoid tissue of the rectal mucosa of a high proportion of scrapie-infected sheep at clinical and preclinical stages, regardless of several host factors; PrPd can also be detected in biopsy specimens of rectal mucosa, with an increased probability proportional to age or incubation period and with an efficiency almost identical to that of tonsil biopsies. Rectal biopsies have the advantages of providing higher numbers of lymphoid follicles and of being simpler to perform, which makes them suitable for scrapie screening in the field. In biopsy samples, PrPd could be demonstrated by immunohistochemical (IHC) and Western immunoblotting methods, and the purpose of the present study was to optimize and evaluate a "rapid test" for the diagnosis of scrapie in rectal biopsy samples. The HerdChek CWD (chronic wasting disease) antigen EIA (enzyme immunoassay) test was chosen and, once optimized, provided specificity and sensitivity figures of 99.2% and 93.5%, respectively, compared with IHC results in the same samples obtained at a postmortem. The sensitivity of the assay increased from 82.1%, when a single rectal mucosa sample was tested to 99.4% for those sheep in which 3 or more samples were analyzed. Similarly, sensitivity values of the HerdChek CWD antigen EIA test on biopsy samples increased from 95% to 100% for sheep subjected to 1 or 2 sequential biopsies 4 months apart, respectively. Thus, a preclinical diagnosis of scrapie in live sheep can be achieved by a combination of a simple sampling procedure, which can be repeated several times with no detrimental effect for the animals, and a rapid and efficient laboratory method.

http://jvdi.org/cgi/content/abstract/20/2/203

Detection of PrPCWD in postmortem rectal lymphoid tissues in Rocky mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) infected with chronic wasting disease Terry R. Spraker1, Thomas L. Gidlewski, Aru Balachandran, Kurt C. VerCauteren, Lynn Creekmore and Randy D. Munger

Correspondence: 1Corresponding Author: Terry R Spraker, Colorado State University Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, 300 W Drake Rd, Fort Collins, CO 80526, e-mail: [email protected]

Preclinical diagnostic tests for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies have been described for mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), using biopsy tissues of palatine tonsil, and for sheep, using lymphoid tissues from palatine tonsil, third eyelid, and rectal mucosa. The utility of examining the rectal mucosal lymphoid tissues to detect chronic wasting disease (CWD) was investigated in Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), a species for which there is not a live-animal diagnostic test. Postmortem rectal mucosal sections were examined from 308 elk from two privately owned herds that were depopulated. The results of the postmortem rectal mucosal sections were compared to immunohistochemical staining of the brainstem, retropharyngeal lymph nodes, and palatine tonsil. Seven elk were found positive using the brainstem (dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve), retropharyngeal lymph nodes, and palatine tonsil. Six of these elk were also found positive using postmortem rectal mucosal sections. The remaining 301 elk in which CWD-associated abnormal isoform of the prion protein (PrPCWD) was not detected in the brainstem and cranial lymphoid tissues were also found to be free of PrPCWD when postmortem rectal mucosal sections were examined. The use of rectal mucosal lymphoid tissues may be suitable for a live-animal diagnostic test as part of an integrated management strategy to limit CWD in elk.

http://jvdi.org/cgi/content/abstract/18/6/553

PrPCWD in rectal lymphoid tissue of deer (Odocoileus spp.) Lisa L. Wolfe1, Terry R. Spraker2, Lorenzo González3, Mark P. Dagleish4, Tracey M. Sirochman1,5, Jeremy C. Brown6, Martin Jeffrey3 and Michael W. Miller1

1 Colorado Division of Wildlife, Wildlife Research Center, 317 West Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO 80526-2097, USA 2 Colorado State University Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA 3 Veterinary Laboratories Agency – Lasswade, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik EH26 0PZ, UK 4 Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik EH26 0PZ, UK 5 Department of Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY 82071, USA 6 Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Wyoming, 1174 Snowy Range Road, Laramie, WY 82070, USA

Correspondence Lisa L. Wolfe [email protected]

The utility of rectal lymphoid tissue sampling for the diagnosis of chronic wasting disease (CWD) infections in mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was evaluated. CWD-associated prion protein (PrPCWD) deposits were observed in the rectal mucosa from 19 orally inoculated mule deer by 381 days post-inoculation (p.i.); similarly, 45 out of 50 naturally infected mule deer had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa. In orally inoculated white-tailed deer, the presence of glycine (G) or serine (S) at codon 96 of the native PrP (denoted 96GG, 96GS or 96SS) appeared to influence the temporal patterns of PrPCWD deposition: nine out of 11 infected 96GG individuals had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa by 342 days p.i., whereas only three out of seven infected 96GS individuals had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa by 381 days p.i. and none of three 96SS individuals had PrPCWD in their rectal mucosa by 751 days p.i. These findings support further evaluation of rectal mucosa sampling in CWD surveillance.

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/88/7/2078

http://vir.sgmjournals.org/cgi/content/full/88/7/2078



April 2, 2008 New Scrapie Live-Animal Test Approved On Jan. 11, 2008, Veterinary Services (VS), a unit within the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, approved a new live-animal test for detecting scrapie in sheep and goats. Similar to the currently used third eyelid test, the test involves collecting lymphoid tissue. The new test, however, uses rectal mucosa biopsy, as opposed to third eyelid biopsy. Both tests can be conducted on live animals using local anesthetic.

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/animal_health/content/printable_version/sa_scrapies08.pdf




2007

animals were tested in 2007 with the identification and removal of positive elk from infected herds. Eighty percent of the positive animals in a highly infected white-tailed deer herd were identified with *** rectal biopsy. The lower incidence of CWD in most infected elk herds complicates the evaluation of this test in elk. It appears that in deer, rectal lymphoid tissue becomes positive later than lymphoid tissue of the head suggesting that early cases may be missed with rectal biopsy. Positive rectal biopsy is indicative of disease but a negative rectal biopsy test does not rule out CWD in an individual or herd.

http://www.usaha.org/committees/reports/2007/report-cwal-2007.pdf


Thursday, August 28, 2008 CWD TISSUE INFECTIVITY brain, lymph node, blood, urine, feces, antler velvet and muscle http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-tissue-infectivity-brain-lymph-node.html

Thursday, August 28, 2008

cwd, feeding, and baiting piles

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/cwd-feeding-and-baiting-piles.html

HAVE ANOTHER GLASS OF CWD PRIONS COURTESY Dane County Wisconsin Mike DiMaggio, solid waste manager

http://chronic-wasting-disease.blogspot.com/2008/08/have-another-glass-of-cwd-prions.html

It was difficult to gain a clear account of incidence and temporal sequence of events (-this presumably is data awaiting publication - see below) but during the period 1981-1984, 10-15 cases occurred at the Sybille facility.

The moribidity amongst mule deer in the facilities ie. those of the natural potentially exposed group has been about 90% with 100% mortality.

snip...

Spraker suggested an interesting explanation for the occurrence of CWD. The deer pens at the Foot Hills Campus were built some 30-40 years ago by a Dr. Bob Davis. At or abut that time, allegedly, some scrapie work was conducted at this site. When deer were introduced to the pens they occupied ground that had previously been occupied by sheep.

http://www.bseinquiry.gov.uk/files/mb/m11b/tab01.pdf

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