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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am heading to Niagara Falls this weekend. Has any one had any problems crossing at the Blue Water bridge with their camper? I know that when I crossed last time without my camper they asked me if I was bringing any food with us. Is there some type of restriction on bringing groceries across?
 

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Mr. Flatfish
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The law is the law, but BABY FORMULA? International trafficing in baby formula, new bioterror weapon?

I know after a baby processes the formula it generates an awesome bioterror weapon... Phew!!!!!!!
 

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I think citrus is a problem. Blue water will ask several times if "you have guns??" Once had a yahoo ask about birth certs for the kids-did not have them. Finally let me in but not until "dont come back without them." Next time I stuck the birth certs out the window at the dude and he didnt know waht to say but "I dont need those" but I said "i cant come in without" and he halfass looked at them. Different now?? Coming back to US probably..
 

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CL-Lewiston said:
I think citrus is a problem. Blue water will ask several times if "you have guns??" Once had a yahoo ask about birth certs for the kids-did not have them. Finally let me in but not until "dont come back without them." Next time I stuck the birth certs out the window at the dude and he didnt know waht to say but "I dont need those" but I said "i cant come in without" and he halfass looked at them. Different now?? Coming back to US probably..
I got caught up in this a year ago a friend had to come back early from vacation his kids stayed with us .he had to drive back to Detroit to straighten this out they would not let us go until he showed up;)

Current Requirements for Entry Into Canada
Visas are not required for U.S. citizens entering Canada from the U.S. You will, however, need:
  1. proof of your U.S. citizenship such as your U.S. passport (For information on obtaining a U.S. passport, check with one of the regional passport agencies located throughout the U.S.) or certified copy of your birth certificate issued by the city, county or state in the U.S. where you were born. If you are a naturalized U.S. citizen and do not have a passport, you should travel with your naturalization certificate. A driver’s license, voter’s registration card or Social Security card is NOT valid proof of citizenship.
  2. photo identification, such as a current, valid driver’s license.
All U.S. citizens entering Canada from a third country must have a valid passport. Alien permanent residents of the U.S. must present their Alien Registration Card, commonly called a “Green Card.”
If you are a dual U.S./Canadian citizen you should always present yourself as a Canadian citizen when entering Canada. However, U.S. citizens should use their U.S. passports when entering or leaving the United States.
Due to international concern over child abduction, single parents, grandparents, or guardians traveling with children often need proof of custody or notarized letters from the other parent authorizing travel. (This is in addition to proof of citizenship s explained above.) Any person under the age of 18 and traveling alone should carry a letter from his/her parent or guardian authorizing the trip. Travelers without such documentation may experience delays at the port of entry.
For further information, including information on student or business travel, visitors can contact the Embassy of Canada at 501 Pennsylvania Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20001, (202) 682-1740, see their Internet home page at http://www.canadianembassy.org or contact the nearest Canadian consulate. (A list of Canadian consulates is at the end of this brochure.)
 

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single shot said:
I am heading to Niagara Falls this weekend. Has any one had any problems crossing at the Blue Water bridge with their camper? I know that when I crossed last time without my camper they asked me if I was bringing any food with us. Is there some type of restriction on bringing groceries across?
What Can I Bring Into Canada?
Declare everything you are carrying including, meat, animal hides, live birds, plants and fruit. These items can harbor microscopic diseases and pests that can seriously harm Canada’s agriculture industry and environment. Administrative penalties of up to $400 may be imposed or prosecution may be pursued if you do not declare restricted or prohibited items. Inspectors of the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) work with specially trained detector dogs — to prevent the entry of plant and animal products prohibited by law.
Remember, the pest and disease situation around the world is constantly changing. Call the Canadian Embassy for the most current information before you travel.
The following items are allowed into Canada. All items must be clean and free of pests, soil and roots.
  • Cheese: Except if packed in whey, 20 kg/person to a maximum of $20.
  • Baby formula: Commercially packaged
  • Seeds: Small seeds: 500 g/person, large seed (such as beans): 5 kg
  • Cut flowers: Except coniferous foliage/green cones. Must not be for propagation.
  • Fresh fruit – tropical: 250 kg/person
  • Fruit and vegetables - frozen, canned or dried: 20 kg/person
  • Some fresh vegetables: Root crops are regulated. Contact CBSA
  • Herbs, spices, tea, coffee, condiments: Allowed
  • Baked goods, candy, etc.: Except those containing meat
  • Fish and seafood: All species except puffer fish and Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir)
  • Leather goods and skins: Fully tanned hides and skins
  • Wood, carvings: Must be free of bark, insects
The following items are also allowed from the United States; however, proof of origin may be required. Plants, animals, and their products from outside of Canada may be prohibited, or may require additional documents before they are allowed entry into Canada. Meat and dairy products, nuts, plants, fruits and live animals, if allowed into Canada, may require permits issued in Canada in advance, and/or certificates from the country of origin. Without required documents, entry is not permitted. Some products, plants or animals may be seized and disposed of, or ordered removed from Canada. Others may require treatment before they can stay. Travelers are responsible for all costs related to disposal, quarantine or treatment.
  • Dairy Products: $20/person
  • Temperate fruits (e.g. those grown in Canada): Restricted, contact CBSA
  • House Plants: Most mainland U.S. States
  • Coniferous wreaths, Christmas trees: Some mainland U.S. States
  • Conifers and garden plants: Restricted, contact CBSA
  • Meat - fresh/frozen/chilled and Meat products: jerky, sausages, deli meats, patties, etc.: 20 kg/person with specific limits of…
  • Game animal carcasses: With hunter's permit
  • Animal fat or suet: 20 kg/person
For current, comprehensive information on customs requirements for Canada, you can visit the Canada International web site at http://www.canadainternational.gc.ca/gtc/Visiting_Travelling_to_Canada-en.aspx.
Alcohol
As long as you meet the age requirements set by the province or territory where you enter Canada, you can import, duty and tax free, one of the following: up to 1.5 liters of wine, or 1.14 liters of liquor, or 24 x 355 milliliter cans or bottles (8.6 liters) of beer or ale. Except in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, you can bring in more than this free allowance of alcohol, as long as the quantities are within the limit set by the province or territory. However, the cost may be high, as you must pay both customs assessments and the provincial or territorial levies and taxes. If you plan to import more than the provincial limit, you must contact the provincial authority and obtain permission before you arrive. In most provinces, the limit is 9.1 liters (2 gallons). Some provinces do allow more.
Tobacco
If you meet the age requirements set by the province or territory where you enter Canada, you can import, duty and tax free, 200 cigarettes, 50 cigars, 200 grams of manufactured tobacco and 200 tobacco sticks. You may bring in additional quantities, but you must pay duties and taxes on the excess amount.
In order to qualify for duty and tax-free entry, you must have these items with you when you enter Canada.
Endangered Species

Canada has signed an international agreement, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), to protect wild animals and plants and their parts or derivatives from over-exploitation in international trade. CITES operates through an import/export permit. However, goods that are controlled under CITES (except for live animals), which are part of a visitor or a seasonal resident’s clothing or accessories, or are contained in their personal baggage, and that they have owned and possessed in their ordinary country of residence, may be exempted from a CITES permit.
An individual must not sell or dispose of the CITES-controlled item within 90 days after the date on which the exemption is claimed.
For more information, contact:
Telephone: 1-800-668-6767 (toll free)
Web Site: http://www.cites.ec.gc.ca
Email: [email protected]
Bringing Pets Into Canada
DOGS: Current, there is no quarantine for import of pet dogs. If you have several dogs, you may be asked to provide certification that they are your personal pets and not for resale. These conditions apply to temporary visits and in-transit visits.
Dogs may enter Canada if accompanied by a valid rabies vaccination certificate issued, in either English or French, by a licensed veterinarian, which clearly identifies the dogs and shows that they are currently vaccinated against rabies. This certificate should identify the dog, as in breed, color, weight, etc., plus indicate the name of the licensed rabies vaccine used (trade name), serial number and duration of validity (up to 3 years). Please note if a validity date does not appear on the certificate, then it is considered a one-year vaccine.
There is no waiting period between the time the dog is vaccinated for rabies and the time it is imported into Canada.
If the above requirements are not met, an inspector will order the owner to have the dog vaccinated for rabies within a period of time specified in the order and to provide the vaccination certificate to an inspector, all at the owner's expense.
* Note: Rabies vaccination or certification is not required if the dogs are less than three (3) months of age.
SPECIAL PURPOSE DOGS: Service dogs that are certified as a guide, hearing or other service dog are not subject to any restrictions for importation where the person importing the dog is the user of the dog and accompanies the dog to Canada.
CATS: Currently, there is no quarantine for the import of pet cats. If you have several cats you may be asked to provide certification that they are your personal pets and are not for resale. Pet cats less than (three) 3 months of age do not require vaccination against rabies. These conditions apply to temporary visits and in-transit visits.
Cats may enter Canada if accompanied by a valid rabies vaccination certificate issued, in either English or French, by a licensed veterinarian, which clearly identifies the cats and shows that they are currently vaccinated against rabies. This certificate should identify the cat, as in breed, color, weight, etc., plus indicate the name of the licensed rabies vaccine used (trade name), serial number and duration of validity (up to 3 years). Please note if a validity date does not appear on the certificate, then it is considered a one-year vaccine.
There is no waiting period between the time the cat is vaccinated for rabies and the time it is imported into Canada.
If the above requirements are not met, an inspector will order the owner to have the cat vaccinated for rabies within a period of time specified in the order and to provide the vaccination certificate to an inspector, all at the owner's expense.
BIRDS: For import purposes, a "pet bird" is a personally owned and cared for bird, and applies only to species commonly known as "caged" birds such as psittacines, love birds, song birds, toucans, canaries, finches, cardinals, etc. This does not apply to pigeons, doves, species of wild or domesticated fowl or game birds.
It is possible to import pet birds under the following conditions:
  • The birds must accompany the owner to Canada.
  • The birds must be found to be healthy when inspected at the port of entry.
  • The owner must sign a declaration stating that the birds have been in his/her possession for the (90) ninety-day period preceding the date of importation and have not been in contact with any other birds during that time.
  • The owner must sign a declaration stating that the birds are the owner’s personal pets and are not being imported for the purpose of re-sale.
  • The owner or any member of the family must not have imported birds into Canada under this pet bird provision during the preceding 90 day period.
The necessary certification to clear Customs will be made by filling out the form, available at Customs. Under the above arrangement, no import permit or quarantine period is required. If these conditions cannot be met, it will be necessary for you to obtain an import permit from the appropriate Canadian Food Inspection Agency regional office in the province into which you will be entering.
OTHER PETS: For specific information on the importation of other kinds of pets into Canada, see the Canadian government web site at http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/heasan/import/petse.shtml.
Firearms
Canada’s firearms laws make Canada safer for residents and visitors. Contact one of the Canadian customs offices or a Canadian Chief Firearms Officer (CFO) for detailed, specific information before you import a firearm. In general, you must be at least 18 years of age to bring a firearm into Canada. Those younger than 18, may use a firearm in certain circumstances, but an adult must remain responsible for the firearm.
Prohibited Firearms
You cannot import prohibited firearms, or any prohibited weapons or devices, including silencers and replica firearms. A prohibited firearm is:
  • a handgun with a barrel length of 105 mm (4.1 inches) or less;
  • a handgun designed or adapted to discharge 25 or 32 caliber ammunition;
  • a rifle or shotgun that has been altered to make it less than 660 mm (26 inches) in overall length;
  • a rifle or shotgun that has been altered to make the barrel length less than 457 mm (18 inches) where the overall firearm length is 660 mm (26 inches) or more;
  • an automatic firearm and a converted automatic firearm;
  • any firearm prescribed as prohibited.
Replica firearms, except for replicas of antique firearms, are prohibited and cannot be brought into Canada. Replica firearms are devices that look exactly or almost exactly like a real firearm but that cannot discharge a projectile or that can only discharge harmless projectiles. As a rule, to be prohibited, a device must closely resemble an existing make and model of firearm, not just a generic firearm. Many of these devices have to be assessed case by case.
Certain handguns for use in international sporting competitions are excluded from the prohibition affecting the short-barreled and 25 or 32 caliber handguns. These handguns therefore are considered restricted firearms under the Criminal Code. A list of these firearms can be found online at http://www.cfc-ccaf.gc.ca/info_for-renseignement/factsheets/r&p_e.asp.
Restricted Firearms
A restricted firearm is:
  • a handgun that is not a prohibited firearm;
  • a semi-automatic, centre-fire rifle or shotgun with a barrel length less than 470 mm (18.5 inches) that is not prohibited;
  • a rifle or shotgun that can fire when its overall length is reduced by folding, telescoping or some other means to less than 660 mm (26 inches);
  • any firearm prescribed as restricted (including some long guns).
A list of restricted firearms can also be found online at http://www.cfc-ccaf.gc.ca/info_for-renseignement/factsheets/r&p_e.asp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well we survived. The boarder in Port Huron isn't that bad. I found out some info that I wanted to pass along. If your camping in Canada and you bring your own groceries, it's permitted if it's packaged. Do not open the packages in case they need to verify where it was bought. Also they asked me my license plate number both times. I've never had that question before but I know my number now. But fresh fruit and veggies will be taken. They don't allow these items to be brought over. The lady in customs was very helpful. I gave customs my receipt from the duty free and answered her questions politely and didn't have any issues. Just keep in mind that the customs people are just doing their job and come across a wide range of people, treat them with respect and you'll be fine.
 
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