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Discussion Starter #1
Guys:
I am curious about the performance of the two weapons. As I understand it, a crossbow has a greater initial velocity than a 'typical' compound bow-am I correct in this assumption? Also, at short ranges, I read that the crossbow retains its velocity, then experiences a drop in velocity at longer ranges. This is where the compound bow provides a greater velocity. Is this correct, and, if so,why does the crossbow lose velocity faster? Are the shorter bolts heavier than a standard aluminium arrow? My old Browing Explorer I bow shoots about 12 FPS. I'm thinking about getting those kiddie suction cup arrow tips for mine...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks 10point!
I was always curious, and wanted to be able to argue my point with some knowledge on the subject. From what I understand(I haven't watched the video yet-no sound card on my computer at work), crossbows have a higher initial velocity than do compound bows, but lose velocity and accuracy rapidly. I'll watch the clip when I get home.
Thanks again!
 

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Initial velocity is a matter of performance and arrow weight. Downrange velocity is a matter of arrow weight. It's as simple as that. A crossbow doesn't magically lose more energy than a compound unless it employs lighter arrows.

In order for a fair conclusion to be drawn, we would have to use both a compound and a crossbow with identical arrow weights and intitial velocities. In this case there should be no performance discrepency whatsoever between the two.
 

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Initial velocity is a matter of performance and arrow weight. Downrange velocity is a matter of arrow weight. It's as simple as that. A crossbow doesn't magically lose more energy than a compound unless it employs lighter arrows.

In order for a fair conclusion to be drawn, we would have to use both a compound and a crossbow with identical arrow weights and intitial velocities. In this case there should be no performance discrepency whatsoever between the two.
That isn't exactly true(close but not exact). There's energy developed by a power stroke which can change the amount of transferred energy. The more power stroke available the more energy is transferred into the projectile. Efficiency can be better achieved when you prolong the energy transfer. One of the reasons heavier arrows will get more energy than a lighter one.;)
 

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That isn't exactly true(close but not exact). There's energy developed by a power stroke which can change the amount of transferred energy. The more power stroke available the more energy is transferred into the projectile. Efficiency can be better achieved when you prolong the energy transfer. One of the reasons heavier arrows will get more energy than a lighter one.;)
So you're saying that two arrows of equal weight launched at identical speeds can have different trajectories and downrange velocities because of power stroke differences?

I understand the benefits of a longer power stroke but am having a very hard time wrapping my head around this theory...
 

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So you're saying that two arrows of equal weight launched at identical speeds can have different trajectories and downrange velocities because of power stroke differences?

I understand the benefits of a longer power stroke but am having a very hard time wrapping my head around this theory...
Theoretically speaking yes. But that would be hard to accomplish really. How would you change power stroke and get the same speeds using the same weights? What you would need to do is to take two bows that would IBO differently to compare. You'd need to makle it so that the 28" bow would release an arrow the same weight and speed as a 30" bow to compare. The shorter draw would lose energy faster because not as much is stored into the arrow as a result of a shorter transfer time. Think of any energy transfer and how much time effects it and it will become more clear.
 

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I'm thinking of it in terms of a crossbow with a 14" power stroke vs a compound with a 22" power stroke.

Lets outfit the compound with an arrow that weighs the same as the ones provided with the crossbow and adjust the draw weight until we reach an identical initial velocity.

I'm betting you a beverage of your choice that both arrows have the same velocity downrange, as well. ;)
 

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I'm thinking of it in terms of a crossbow with a 14" power stroke vs a compound with a 22" power stroke.

Lets outfit the compound with an arrow that weighs the same as the ones provided with the crossbow and adjust the draw weight until we reach an identical initial velocity.

I'm betting you a beverage of your choice that both arrows have the same velocity downrange, as well. ;)
Put it together and I'll buy the beverages regardless.:lol:
 

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who makes that bow ?
That's the R.E.B., The reverse energy bow, made by the Reverse Energy Bow Company of Montrose Colorado. I don't believe that they are currently in production but Total Firearms in Mason carried them. Suggested retail was around $700, roughly 13" axle to axle.



And no that's not me shooting it, it's the inventor. :lol:

 
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