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Just thought I would post this in case anyone had a similar experience. I live in Livingston county for over 5 years now. In that time I have seen 1 coyote running through a field next to the house, 1 huge male that I shot with my bow while deer hunting, and 1 female that I called in and shot in late winter wtih a rifle. Sunday evening, I was watering a few apple trees I planted this year, and I was crouched down getting the hose from the water tank under the tree, and under the fence that I put around them. Keep in mind, my garden tractor and trialer with water tank is about 30ft away. I heard something in the brush, and didnt look up right away since I was getting hammered by deer flies and just wanted to finish what I was doing. After about 3 seconds the noise is much closer and more rapid so I looked up and then JUMPED UP when I saw a huge dog coming straight at me!!! I didnt realize it was a coyote at first since I was at ground level and could only see the head/face, so I just yelled "HEY" at this thing and waved my arms like I was going to come after him (this once worked when I was attacked by an Alaskan Husky years ago) so it must have just been my instinct. However, this dog DID NOT immediately stop or turn around, more acted confused, took a few more steps towards me (now about 12-15 feet away, THEN turned and bounced away. Once I saw this thing, I fully realized it was a coyote, and on the smaller side. I think it saw me crouched down and maybe assumed I was much smaller, until I stood up. It didnt look like it had mange or anythng bad, just one daring SOB. Little closer than I would have liked...anyone have a similar experience? I have tried to thin them by calling in the winter, but not much luck.
 

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I have had lots of coyote encounters. I have been followed by them at night while walking out from night fishing during the hex hatch ( shined light and see several sets of eyeballs in the brush).
I have had them come at me until they realized i was a human or at least biger than them.
I have had them real close and aggressive ( barking & growling) while i was gutting out a deer at night.
 

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I've seen people catch them with their bare hands and take pictures. They are usually really passive around humans almost like a dog that has been beaten. Humans usually make them cowar right down if they are out of gas and can't run anymore.

Around hounds they are ultra agressive at times. Each seems to have their own personality. I've been on many many bay ups in the last five years.
 

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I've seen people catch them with their bare hands and take pictures. They are usually really passive around humans almost like a dog that has been beaten. Humans usually make them cowar right down if they are out of gas and can't run anymore.

Around hounds they are ultra agressive at times. Each seems to have their own personality. I've been on many many bay ups in the last five years.
Don't tell these people on here they can handle a coyote with there bare hands. They have no idea what a bayed up coyote is. All we need is some kid to read this and think he's a coyote wrangler.

Griff
 

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Don't tell these people on here they can handle a coyote with there bare hands. They have no idea what a bayed up coyote is. All we need is some kid to read this and think he's a coyote wrangler.

Griff
Assuming most people know that Wild animals are DANGEROUS!! You should not handle them.... However I have seen it done and I would never do it myself..... Should have stated that in the above post. I was trying to say that the coyotes behavior in the original post does seem odd to what I have expierenced.
 

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I have had them circle my cabin while we were sitting out at the fire pit. Standing up and yelling at them made the go away.


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Also live in Livingston Co.....had 2 bring down a deer right in my yard last spring. Deer was down, but still alive. The yotes would not leave when my wife came up to them....FIL was visiting, and they only left when he came out and yelled at them. Wish I would have been home....

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Why i always carry the trusty sig with me while inthe woods
 

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For whatever reason Livingston county is loaded with them,I see them all the time during the Archery season. Usually get to fling an arrow at one every year it seems.
 

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Had to chase one off of a deer a buddy killed. We blood trailed it a little ways and found it with the coyote chewing the hind end of it. He didn't want to leave. Also had one follow me out of the woods in the dark after bowhunting one evening two years ago. Followed me all the way to the truck barking and growling. Farmer planting our food plots had one chase him on his tractor. Surpirising to me more people aren't attacked by them.
 

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Seems like for the most part they try to avoid humans, especially when your tring to hunt them. But I have had a couple encounters that kind of freaked me out. The worst was when I was about 12 years old, a buddy and I went ice fishing on a local pond after dark, we just took our gear and a lantern, no shanty. The pond was dug and had high berms all the way around it, so you couldnt see past them once you were on it. About an hour after we got out there we heard a coyote howl about a hundred yards away, which we thought was pretty cool. But then all of a sudden we started hearing barks and yips coming from all different dirrections and what sounded like atleast 8-10 coyotes or maybe more were circleing the pond just outside the berms. they were so close that we could hear them trotting around in the snow, along with the occasional barks and growls. this went on for a couple minutes before we decided the best thing to do would be to start yelling at them and make as much noise as possible. This worked and they took off, but it was pretty scary knowing that they obviously knew we were humans, and they were clearly plotting what to do with or about us.

The other was a couple years later and me, a buddy, and my 11 year old sister were on our way home from school when we spotted a coyote in a hayfield. Being the teenage idiots that we were, we quickly convinced my sister that some one had lost their dog and she should go try to catch it. Well she got about 40 yards out into the field and instead of running away like we thought it would, the coyote took interest and started cirling towards her in a stalking, predatory stance. We jumped out and ran towards her yelling which luckily scared the coyote away, because as far out as she was, it could have gotten to her alot quicker than we could have.
 

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I have had encounters. None that I considered threatening, many fatal. I have only had one threatening encounter in the woods and that was a bear.
 

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Any restrictions to Shootin coyotes? Saw one last week on the golf course, and a couple within a few miles of the house. Lots of farm land and timber in the area. Could be crazy, but I worry that one of them will get hungry and brave.
 

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This past April, I was trapping beaver late one evening a few miles into National Forest Land near Curan and in the process of walking out a quarter mile from a beaver pond with a forty pound beaver in one hand when I heard trotting off to my right not thirty yards away. At first, I thought I had jumped a deer but when I caught movement to my left and additional sounds twenty-five feet behind me where I had just busted through the tag alder thickets, I got a little concerned. As I dropped the beaver in my left hand, numerous coyotes, four or more, started yipping, howling and barking so close that I could distinguish the different tones of their individual voices. As soon as I charged my glock, which I frantically fumbled out from my waistband the metallic racking got them to stop together almost immediately. I picked up my beaver and stiff legged it another three hundred yards back to my truck, the whole time being serenaded from the sides and rear.

I had always thought of the woods as an extension of my back yard before that, never really worrying about its inhabitants whatsoever. The glock had always accompanied me for personal protection from two legged rodents. Not anymore.

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I had 2 packs fallow me out of the wood one night after bowhunting. Not sure just how close but ones to my right seemed like under 50 yards and the group to my left were coming in fast and stoped at about 75yards or so..Funny thing this thread came up last night In golf league on the 2nd tee box a fox came out of the woods sat down 10 to 12 yards in fornt of our 4 some rolled around on its back and side to side like a dog as the 4 of us teed off. never moved until we started to drive the carts towards it...Look like its used to seeing golfers..
 

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Wonder why coyote season isn't open year round?
My guess is its an ethical decision. Even though they are terribly destructive creatures, it wouldnt be very ethical to allow hunters to go out and shoot a female while she has a litter of pups in the den depending on her to survive. It makes sense to me, I hate coyotes, but I still wouldnt want to be the cause of their pups suffering and starving to death.
 
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