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coyote/deer question

1392 Views 6 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  Bowhunt
Just getting back into deer hunting and recently closed on the property. We have a couple of trail camera's up and have been getting pretty steady pictures of deer. Then I got pictures of Coyotes and the deer pictures dried up. Is this pretty common and if so what's the typical pause in deer pictures? We have an active food plot on the property so we have food, water and cover so that's not the issue. Thanks in advance for the feedback
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I’ve seen coyotes follow and pester deer and I have also seen them live in harmony...bedded 50 yards apart and each knew the other were there. There are too many factors in the pics drying up to give you an answer...your food could answer it (desires change by the week...right now, shifting off grains and over to alfalfa or clover). Your new presence can shift them (not a bad thing this time of year) etc. one food source will not keep deer consistent al year long. Add any of the multiple factors and also that we are getting closer to dawning time and does disperse to give birth in peace and raise the little ones before getting back with the rest of the family in a couple months. Anyway, if coyotes are thick, it never hurts to thin them out to help fawn recruitment, but you will never eradicate them...when there is ample food and numbers are low, they reproduce more pups, when food is low or there is a big population, they have less pups. It’s odd, but it’s nature keeping things in balance.
But to answer your question...I’ve had a yote in front of the camera and minutes later deer again. They can have an impact, but aren’t likely the main reason the pics dried up.
Thanks Smith 34. Probably just a coincidence but thought I would throw my first question out there.
I’ve seen coyotes follow and pester deer and I have also seen them live in harmony...bedded 50 yards apart and each knew the other were there. There are too many factors in the pics drying up to give you an answer...your food could answer it (desires change by the week...right now, shifting off grains and over to alfalfa or clover). Your new presence can shift them (not a bad thing this time of year) etc. one food source will not keep deer consistent al year long. Add any of the multiple factors and also that we are getting closer to dawning time and does disperse to give birth in peace and raise the little ones before getting back with the rest of the family in a couple months. Anyway, if coyotes are thick, it never hurts to thin them out to help fawn recruitment, but you will never eradicate them...when there is ample food and numbers are low, they reproduce more pups, when food is low or there is a big population, they have less pups. It’s odd, but it’s nature keeping things in balance.
But to answer your question...I’ve had a yote in front of the camera and minutes later deer again. They can have an impact, but aren’t likely the main reason the pics dried up.
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Reactions: LabtechLewis
Being a coyote trapper with some experience and that many of my trapping properties are in reality, deer hunting properties 1st and foremost, coyote and deer coexist most of the year as smith34 pointed out. When they don’t, it’s been my observations that it has to do with the fluctuation of the coyote’s prey base on a property or the coyote’s home territory.

I have found the biggest year-round negative impact on deer on any property are dogs being turned loose at night by neighbors and allowed to run. I personally have had 1st hand experience with 2-3 large dogs coming onto a wooded, 500 acre deer hunting property and creating havoc almost nightly with non-stop chasing deer. Once this situation was corrected deer numbers dramatically increased quickly.
I get pics pretty regularly of deer being chased by coyotes on my cams. I still have plenty of deer.
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Every place I have hunted that had a lot of deer also had a lot of coyotes. Never had a problem with coyotes running deer off. Stray or neighbor dogs chasing deer have screwed me over numerous times.
If you have good deer habitat, you are going to always have coyotes. Good deer habitat is also good habitat for many other forms of wildlife which coyotes are going to target. They are always going to be in areas where their chance for a meal is the highest.
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