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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had about 100 pine trees cut, they're all 14 inches at the base or bigger, with some about 28. The loggers cut the trees all the way down to about 6 inches in diameter. Now I am left with the mess to clean up. The cut was in a very concentrated area of about 10 acres, so you can imagine the mess. Should I start cleaning it up or just leave it until spring. I intend to pile up the smaller stuff (branches 2inches thick) and burn the rest. I have to admit, when I look at now I say what have done? Lol

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That's rabbit, grouse, and deer cover, wildlife will be more apt to go in there during the day, rather than just at night.
 

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I have exactly the same problem with my property. About 10 acres of 12" pines were cut last year prior to my buying it. I've been too busy working on the cabin and putting in food plots in other areas to do anything with the limbs and tops that were left yet.
 

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If white pine was cut the tops could last a long time. If it was red pine that was harvested the tops will start to decay pretty quickly, especially if they are in a shady area that stays damp. Should you have the time to lop the tops a bit and get them on the ground they will rot even faster.

Did you have anything in your contract about the tops? Most foresters write contracts requiring wood to be cut (and paid for) down to a 4" top. This usually leaves very little residual and what is left should rot down to insignificance in a few short years. If tops must be left there is often a clause to require tops be left no higher than a certain height. If a landowner has concerns, three feet +/- is generally reasonable.

If the tops are really bothering you and there is no leverage in the contract that could be used to convince the loggers to come back and do something, have you considered renting or hiring a bulldozer? With a dozer there would be a couple options. The first would be to root-rake the tops into piles. Another option would be to merely drive the dozer over the tops to crush them down. With this option it might be best to wait until the decay process if far enough along so there is little "spring" left in the limbs. FM
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They are all White Pine. I plan on limbing the tops and piling and burning some of them this winter. I have neighbor with a outdoor boiler. They will take anything I give them. Going to be a LOT of work I know. But it will keep me from getting FAT this winter.

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I'm with Linda G. I just had about 10 acres of Norway Spruce harvested and I'm letting it lay. It's good cover and also protects the upcoming saplings. I push them aside where I want paths and make rabbitats. Otherwise I'll spend my time doing things that get better results - brush mgmt. and TSI.
 
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