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How hard is it to do yourself? The pull on my Weatherby Vanguard is way too heavy. The trigger is adjustable for pull and creep. I have the manual on how to do it but just need to get a very small wrench to do the job. Is it difficult to get it "just right" or am I better off handing it off to a gunsmith. I like the idea of getting it exactly how I like it by trial and error.
 

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Trigger adjustments are not terribly tricky; it's been a few years since I set up the trigger on my Wby Euromark but I recall it wasn't very difficult.

I fabricated a snap cap using a spent shell to test the trigger pull as I did not (and still don't) have a trigger scale. To make the snap cap I punched the primer out of the spent shell and custom fit in a piece of pink pencil eraser into the primer pocket. When I got the trigger where I wanted it, I was done.

The adjustments are pretty sensitive - a dab will do ya. My first try at lightening the pull I think you could have breathed on the trigger and the hammer would fall.
 

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They're not terrible hard to do. But if you're not sure what your doing, it's best to let a gunsmith do it. If your Vanguard is like my Howa, one adjustment is pull, the other is creep. I got mine down to about 1 #. One thing you MUST do if you do it yourself, is make VERY small adjustments (1/8 to 1/4 turn) at a time. Adjust only one adjustment screw at a time so you can restore it back if need be. Test it by racking the bolt and turning off the safety and then bang the butt of the gun on the floor. If the trigger trips, it's too soft and could cause accidental misfires. I bang mine pretty hard on the floor. Sometimes if it's set too soft, just racking the bolt will fire the pin. Most gunsmiths only charge $25 or so.
 

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If your rifle is made for adjustments with set screws as you describe then you do not need to pay anybody a dime.

As stated work slowly in 1/8 or 1/16 turn increments, work the bolt back and forth ruggedly to make sure it stays cocked while locking. [Some rifles can release the sear without firing when you close the bolt if set too light.]

I have target guns with 4 Oz triggers but for deer hunting I don't go less than 2 lb. Remember you may have hunting gloves on and/or be a bit excited so if you are not used to a light pull you can let it go to soon. Get a snap cap for your caliber and dry fire a few hundred times with bare fingers and gloves to get the feel, it will become instinctive.

If you do not have a trigger pull scale you can make one with a bent coat hanger and a milk jug - water weighs 8 lb per gallon so 1 Qt [32 Oz] is 2 lb etc etc. Your trigger should let the weighted jug hang without breaking but should break immediately with the slightest additional pressure.

IMHO creep is more important than pull weight, a crisp 4 lb trigger is fine for hunting but a creepy 2 lb trigger is still lousy. It should break like a thin glass rod snapping.

Work slow, follow instructions and you will do fine.
 

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Dont mess with the creep.

The weight of pull can be done as described-slowly. First time or two-1/4 turn and then less. You will be amazed at the difference. Even a deer rifle should be in the 2-2 1/2 pound range.
 

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Dont mess with the creep.

The weight of pull can be done as described-slowly. First time or two-1/4 turn and then less. You will be amazed at the difference. Even a deer rifle should be in the 2-2 1/2 pound range.
'Creep' is really a sear engagement adjustment on most triggers. Reducing the overlap between two metal surfaces shortens the distance the trigger has to move before breaking. This is a very sensitive and critical adjustment but you can tweak it better if careful.

1/4 turn on a 32 or 40 pitch set screw is .006" - .008" which can be quite a bit when you get near the edge. Smaller adjustments are better, also keep track of how many turns you have done from the start.
 

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Some good advice here. I would add that most trigger problems are generally related to the surfaces of the hammer sear engagement. Polishing these out will most likely solve most of the problem. Not a good idea to do this unless you know what your doing. Once metal is removed it can't be replaced. I put an after market trigger in my #1 ruger and it helped some. But after honing the sear and hammer, WOW what a difference. I really can't beleive they put the gun together the way they did. Talk about nasty, it took me a whole five minutes to hone these parts which should of been done at the factory. I knew this going in though as ruger still hasn't figured out how to put a decent trigger into a rifle.
Oaks:
 
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