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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I currently have a 50 or so crab apple trees planted on my property in west central Ohio and I would like to also plant some cedar trees but I am afraid they will infect my crab apples. How close can the two be to each other without major issues? Are there crab apple species that are resistant? Also are wild or american plum trees susceptible to apple rust?
 

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As far away as possible but i will say the only tree i have that gets affected is about 75 ft away from a large red cedar .I have plans to cut it down this winter and will cut any others i have on my property ...most are quite small .Once a cedar and apple get the disease they pass it back to each other each year .
 

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I currently have a 50 or so crab apple trees planted on my property in west central Ohio and I would like to also plant some cedar trees but I am afraid they will infect my crab apples. How close can the two be to each other without major issues? Are there crab apple species that are resistant? Also are wild or american plum trees susceptible to apple rust?
You don't say white or red cedar .I have not heard of white cedar spreading the disease .
 

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https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/gymnosporangium_juniperi-virginianae.shtml

I just looked at it to, it is only RED!

This fungus is wide spread in eastern North America. It is usually associated with rural areas that alternate between farmland and forest or thicket. It requires two hosts to be present, usually within a mile of each other, a juniper species, usually eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana), and an apple, crabapple (Malus or Pyrus spp. depending on source), hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) or quince (Cydonia oblonga). The fungus takes on different forms on each host and most readily noticeable on redcedar. One form or another of the fungus can be can be found throughout the growing season, but may not be seen in drier sites until after a series of rains. It frequently is found in disturbed or open areas such as along gravel or dirt roads, trails openings, pastures and apple orchards.
 
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You will definitely know it if you see it. Doesn't resemble anything else that I have seen, lol. I have a red cedar on the fringe of my yard that I could easily throw an apple and hit from my apple trees. Been there for years with no problem. Showed up about three years ago. These fungi are about golf ball size on the cedar.
Terrestrial plant Fruit Evergreen Tree shortstraw pine

Flower Plant Larch Terrestrial plant Herbaceous plant
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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You will definitely know it if you see it. Doesn't resemble anything else that I have seen, lol. I have a red cedar on the fringe of my yard that I could easily throw an apple and hit from my apple trees. Been there for years with no problem. Showed up about three years ago. These fungi are about golf ball size on the cedar.
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The Rust just showed up recently? so does it effect your trees? I am debating cutting my cedars down for this reason but i have one right behind a ground blind that I swear provides some kind of cover scent. Im worried if I cut it down I will mess things up.
 

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The Rust just showed up recently? so does it effect your trees? I am debating cutting my cedars down for this reason but i have one right behind a ground blind that I swear provides some kind of cover scent. Im worried if I cut it down I will mess things up.
Haven't noticed anything out of the ordinary on my apple trees yet. They have some spots but that could be several things as I haven't been the most diligent about spraying.

What type of apple trees?


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They are old standard size yellow delicious, red delicious and some sort of dual variety. There is also a pear tree planted right next to them. They were planted by the previous owner and were very mature when I bought my place twenty years ago. The yellow delicious is in serious decline due to some very bad ice storm damage a few years ago.
 
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