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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gentlemen -

I thought I'd share a recent change that I made.

For ten years I have been using Easton XX75 2317 aluminum arrows. Recently most of my buddies have switched to carbons. I decided that the next time I needed arrows I would try a carbon. Well, I needed arrows after this season so I bought some Easton Epic 340s. I asked the shop owner if I could chronograph the difference. The aluminum put out 223 ft/second. The carbon flew at 267 ft/second. WOW. These arrows MOVE. The only complaint I have is that they are considerably LOUDER than my old arrows.

Don't get me wrong. I am not saying that the carbons are better arrows. My XX75s put down 19 deer over the years. I just thought I would post this for anyone who is considering the swap and wanted details.
 

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Anytime you lighten up the arrows and increase the speed, noise will increase...regardless of arrow material. I just went from 500gr carbons to 420gr carbons and the noise level jumped up considerably. I may go back to the heavy weights. That said, I'll never go back to aluminum. They work fine and always will but today's carbon are far superior. Pound for pound they will out penetrate aluminum every time due to there stiffness and their durability is much better. Obviously, penetration on deer is never a problem usually, but if you use mechanicals, carbons are always the better choice. I don't know anybody personaly that has switched back to aluminum for hunting once they have tried carbons. The spot shooters I know still use aluminum, but they shoot the large diameter arrows just for spots.

At 267, make sure you spend lots of time with your broadheads. Thats getting up there in speed and can cause problems with some fixed blades. A helical fletch and feathers will help. There's a good chance your current set up will work fine, just don't hesitate to start shooting broadheads in the off season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Swamp Monster - thanks for the tip. I haven't even shot a carbon with my broadheads yet. In fact, I haven't shot over 10 yards (too cold outside). Maybe I will give it a try this weekend.
 

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I've gone between 300 grain arrows, to 325, and up to around 400 for about 10 years now, and find I like my 300-325 gr. range the best. My favorites are the Carbon Express 200's, with an 80 grain GT Silvertip, around 63#'s, at about 275fps.

Aluminums are great, and other than durability, if you are only going to ever shoot 20 yards, they maybe the best no-nonsense choice. I don't only shoot 20 yards, and that's why I prefer the carbons. I've also found they are still very quiet, if shot from a quiet bow.
 

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The aluminum put out 223 ft/second. The carbon flew at 267 ft/second.
As Swamp ststed....the diefference in speed can not be attributed to "carbon vs alumminum". The weight difference is they largest factor in speed increase.

I guess a smaller diameter carbon would be slightly faster, all else being equal (I.E. fletch size and type, tip weight etc), if only through friction and less physical mass. I'd be surprised if it equated to 1 fps though...pretty minute.

I'm not anti carbon ( I shoot both) just general info;)
 

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It make sense to me, that an aluminum, doe to the fact it is less stiff than a carbon arrow, would have more "flex" at the impact of the hit, and therefore, would absorbe some of the energy of the shot that would have otherwise been transfered by a stiffer, even though lighter, carbon shaft, resulting in increased penetration by the carbon shaft.

What do you think?

There is also a huge difference in wind-drift from carbon to aluminum. I've seen a 2413 drift 10" at 44 yards, where a small diameter carbon drifted 4" at the same target, shot at the same time. Again, this doesn't really matter to the guy that will only shoot 20 yards, but it is a big difference if you are capable of longer.
 

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Originally posted by NorthJeff
It make sense to me, that an aluminum, doe to the fact it is less stiff than a carbon arrow, would have more "flex" at the impact of the hit, and therefore, would absorbe some of the energy of the shot that would have otherwise been transfered by a stiffer, even though lighter, carbon shaft, resulting in increased penetration by the carbon shaft.
Exactly! Aluminums also "flex" more at the shot, even when spined properly. This also immediately absorbs some of the energy your set up produces. A set up with carbon arrows that produces 60 ftlbs will out penetrate a set up with aluminum arrows that produces 60ftlbs. And in my humble opinion, energy figures are over rated for the most part anyway. Broadhead design, shot placement, and a well tuned bow are far more important than energy figures, when it comes to penetration.

The durability factor is what sold me though. I have actually spent less on arrows now because I started to pay more.....does that make sense?!!!!
 
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