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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a gas line that runs straight through the middle of my property. The soil is incredibly sandy (dune sand essentially), but still grows native species. Not easy to grow anything else. Do you think it would be beneficial for me to mow once or twice a year to provide a top mulch layer to improve water retention, and slowly improve the soil over time? I'm not looking to put food plots in, but I want to plant switchgrass or some sort of screen eventually.
 

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If you can incorporate organics and fertilize in the spring and fall I would also do this...It will be best done in several lighter application and will give you thicker grass which will when mowed give you more organics.

Add in some apple or pear trees....if you know anyone who has a tree prune it in late winter...then dip the cut end into a pile of rooting hormone powder. Poke a hole into a pot of compost to make room for the stem, and plant it so that the first set of leaves is right above the surface of the compost. Water the pot and when ready plant in a hole that is mixed with the sand and compost. They will grow tall...prune of the height of the trees. Protect the truck with something so the deer and rabbits do not rub or eat the bark....after they mature...remove the protection.

Thank us later.

If you can get water to the area do it. Rain collection is always an option.
 

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Last year I didn’t mow our lawn up north until Labor Day weekend. It’s right on the edge of sandy soil and low land. The grass was really tall and after mowing it was really brown. Come back a month later after all the rain in September and the deer were hammering it. It’s was lush green and had some natural clover growing in it. Had 7 fresh scrapes in the lawn on the bow opener. Saw lots of does and had a close encounter with a nice buck. I’m going to do the same this year and hope for similar results.
 

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One of the biggest issues with gas pipelines is getting the soil corrected after they did their work.

I actually have 5 seperate pipelines on one easement on my property. I was (key word) farming this pipeline (when it had 4 lines). We grew and harvested hay. The company came in and paid a hefty price to extend the easement and put in an additional line. Having a background in the excavation and construction side of things, I specifically asked to have the top soil put off to the side and then put back on after the work was done.

That did NOT get done. The resulting issue was clay that was mined from the bottom of the hole that ended up being put on the top after filling in said hole! This resulted in water issues, soil related issue... the list goes on and on. You CAN fix the soil, it just takes some time and effort. As Luv2hunteup mentioned, get the soil sample done and it will tell you what you are lacking.

Natural "green" fertilizer is a definate help. By green, I mean planting rye, oats, anything that will die off later on and provide nutrients to the soil.

I'm now growing gorn, sorghum, turnups, rape, clover, and alfalfa on the above mentioned abortion they created! I could tell stories but... I fixed the issue myself! It took careful planning, work, and TIME!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One of the biggest issues with gas pipelines is getting the soil corrected after they did their work.

I actually have 5 seperate pipelines on one easement on my property. I was (key word) farming this pipeline (when it had 4 lines). We grew and harvested hay. The company came in and paid a hefty price to extend the easement and put in an additional line. Having a background in the excavation and construction side of things, I specifically asked to have the top soil put off to the side and then put back on after the work was done.

That did NOT get done. The resulting issue was clay that was mined from the bottom of the hole that ended up being put on the top after filling in said hole! This resulted in water issues, soil related issue... the list goes on and on. You CAN fix the soil, it just takes some time and effort. As Luv2hunteup mentioned, get the soil sample done and it will tell you what you are lacking.

Natural "green" fertilizer is a definate help. By green, I mean planting rye, oats, anything that will die off later on and provide nutrients to the soil.

I'm now growing gorn, sorghum, turnups, rape, clover, and alfalfa on the above mentioned abortion they created! I could tell stories but... I fixed the issue myself! It took careful planning, work, and TIME!
I'm in a debate with myself whether or not to plant food in the pipeline for two reasons:
1. it is out in the open, unless I am able to get a plot screen growing
2. I am trying to keep the deer organized on my property so that it holds more bucks. If I plant food in the pipeline, does and fawns will be all over, and I won't have the depth of cover I am looking for. Therefore I think it could make movements unpredictable for bow season. But who knows- it's all about trial and error!
 

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Yes it is. I will tell you that my pipeline boarders 3 properties and I struggled with wanting to keep deer internal to my property. In the end, it was the best decision. I can see over 800 yards, watch and evaluate deer movement, and monitor.

I've killed and also witnessed the biggest bucks on my pipeline. All with a bow.

Get your soil right and use corn as screens. The deer will use the edges and hide in it. Best thing I ever did on my place. They hated that hay field.

Also, use a decoy! When deer can see such a long distance, they will key on that decoy and come running
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes it is. I will tell you that my pipeline boarders 3 properties and I struggled with wanting to keep deer internal to my property. In the end, it was the best decision. I can see over 800 yards, watch and evaluate deer movement, and monitor.

I've killed and also witnessed the biggest bucks on my pipeline. All with a bow.

Get your soil right and use corn as screens. The deer will use the edges and hide in it. Best thing I ever did on my place. They hated that hay field.

Also, use a decoy! When deer can see such a long distance, they will key on that decoy and come running
Great advice. Definitely would provide a better opportunity to glass(if you can call it that in the LP of Michigan). I have been considering a decoy for a long time, and think I will give it a try this year!
 

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Great advice. Definitely would provide a better opportunity to glass(if you can call it that in the LP of Michigan). I have been considering a decoy for a long time, and think I will give it a try this year!
I'm very familiar with the Walhalla area. I hunted in Custer for many years.

The Wexford, Lake, Manistee, and Mason county area is a bit different to hunt than other areas in the state. The farm areas of Mason county (around Custer) are very similar to hunting in Southern Michigan. The woods, swamps, and water of Lake and Wexford are a little bit different bear altogher. Much harder to predict animal movement.

I have one particular stand that can see 600 yards in one direction and almost 350 in the other. On many occasions I would see a shooter buck traveling behind me at around 450 yards. At that distance it is difficult if not impossible to grunt and have the animal hear you. So how do you get their attention? I purchased a Flambou decoy (plastic) with changable ears. I killed that buck the first night I deployed that decoy.

A few tricks. Put metal pegs on the feet so you can peg it to the ground. The normal ears work much better than the laid back ears. With those, the deers attention seem to stray to what it appears the decoy is looking at. Do not leave it out overnight. I hide mine in the bushes laying on the ground and cover it with burlap. Do not apply any scent to it. If you want to incorperate scent, leave it on the ground. When placing it, have the decoy quartering away from you. The other deer tend to come in from the rear thus they are not coming in head on to you.

I never used one in closed areas (wooded areas). I use it as a visual aid to bring in deer. It lends well to fields and pipelines. Of all the tools in my aresenal, this has been the best over the last 3 seasons. I've harvested 3 bucks off from it and had the opportunity to take many others.
 
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