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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dad always said not to hunt rabbits untill after a good snow fall.
Why???
 

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I was always told that a little harsh wheather would weed out the sick or deseased rabbits. Also, it makes fleas a little less of a problem.
 

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I believe its the parasites(NSofS)After the first frost kills them.BE wery wery quite it, its wabbit season!! :D

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HAPPY AND SAFE HUNTING TO ALL.
 

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Well, that and at least according to the guys I hunted rabbit with two weekends ago, they are much easier to spot in the snow. We just had a dusting of snow then, and once teh sun came out the little buggers had lots of camo cover. (we got a couple though)
 
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With snow it makes for easier hunting especially if you don't have dogs. The colder weather also helps get rid of the fleas and other things like liver problems. Good hunting and enjoy the outdoors.
 

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I agree with cold killing the parisites. I have killed bunnies with liver spots all season long though. Both MI and OH.
EASIER TO SEE FOR SURE! :)
 

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Fresh snowfall=Fresh tracks. At least you can see where they've been. :) I agree with the flea and lack of camo reason, too.
 

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Well, funny this came on the board because I just got off the phone and we are getting snow this weekend, and I got invited to back out wabbit hunting!
I am getting a new shotgun this week and am itching to try it, but I think I will stick with the one I have been using since I won't have much chance to sight it in. before this weekend.
 

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Sorry guys, but I have to disagree; I think that I have shot more rabbits that were heavily infested with fleas in winter than at any other time. I think it is due to the fact that rabbits tend to "hole up" together more in winter due to cold temps, lack of cover, ect. Also, the only rabbits that I can remember having shot having tularemia were in the dead of winter. Maybe I just have bad luck? But I must admit that I tend to pursue bunnies more in Dec, Jan, and Feb because all my other favorite seasons (duck, pheasant, grouse, ect) are closed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the responces.
However, what do these parasites look like?
Are there holes in the liver or just nodules?

Thanks again
 

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Tularemia, or "rabbit fever"-the liver is usually a little darker than normal and will have small, grayish spots or nodules on it.
Also, check the meat, esp. in the area of the backstraps, for tapeworm cysts. These look like a lttle pearl onion with a green pepper seed inside. Any rabbit can have these, but you usually find them in rabbits that are infested with fleas (the flea is host for the tapeworm--a flea gets ingested, then the tapeworm grows). When a predator eats the rabbit, it ingests the cysts and the tapeworm invades a new host. I always were rubber gloves when cleaning rabbits anymore.
 

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I always pitch the ones with Tulmanaria. I make sure that the dogs stay away from the discarded bunny as well.
 

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I discard both; while tularemia is "curable", the tapeworm cysts are NOT; once you have them in your body, the're yours to keep! Why take a chance?
 

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I've never nowingly encountered the other. If I ever shoot anymore bunnies I'll watch for them!
 
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