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Most of my hunting is on public land in SE Mich. The chunks of state land aren't that big so there are plenty of nearby farm fields where deer can eat. Therefore, I've never paid much attention to non-agricultural food sources. Oh sure, I look for Oaks and keep an eye out for apple trees but that's about it. This year I've been reading how many successful hunters pay attention to non-agricultural food sources and browse. When hunting pressure picks up these guys say deer hit these food sources. They mention sources such as certain types of Aspen trees, Locut pods and a variety of plants. About the only plants I can identify are poison ivy/sumac, hay and Queen Anne's Lace. When it comes to trees I can identify 6-8 of the most common types (Oak, Maple, Elm, etc) but after that I'm lost. Fortunately I can get a book to identify trees/plants. I know that deer will eat just about anything. Where I need help is knowing the plants and trees that deer like most and at what time during hunting season do they hit 'em. So, if you set your stands based on non-agricultural food sources please let me know the types of plants/trees you look for. I sure appreciate it.

Good luck,
John-Ypsi
 

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For me, the trouble with non-agricultural food sources is that they are scattered all over an area and do not really lend to consistency of movement. Heck, anywhere I hunt I see deer browsing on just about anything. What has worked for me has been identifying bedding areas. If you get close enough to a bedding area (without alerting the deer) in a non-agricultural area you will see deer morning and night.
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I agree with Joe, they tend to munch on all the twigs as they travel. Travel routes may be your best bet.

But if you can find several oak trees that produce good acorns, especially white oaks, they will tend to make that part of their travel route because they love them so much. Otherwise, look for white pine, they seem to like the cover and the soft needles.
 
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