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Say My Name.
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I have read, and I cannot remember where, (though I continue to look), that brassicas are vulnerable to disease of some sort if planted on the same site for several successive years.

This is the kind of thing that runs through my mind as I spreadsheet my five-year plan of food plot rotation!

Who knows more than I do about this?
 

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I have also read the same thing but have never had a problem with it. I try not to plant brassicas in the same spot every year. It is included with my clover plantings which last 3-4 year between planting.

I have planted it 2 years in a row in the same location while creating a seed bed for clover establishment with no negative impact or disease yet. It is sage advice to not push the envelope.
 

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I've planted the last 3 years in a row dwarf essex rape in the same spot and no problems yet.. This year I did mix in some oats and turnips.. Thank you for the advice , I will rotate next year..tks..
 

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I've read and heard the same thing. I don't think 2 years is a problem, but it works best for me anyways to rotate 1/2 of my fields each year for all clover and clover/brassica plantings. By doing this brassicas are only on each 1/2 of the field every other year.
 

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This sage advice applies to all crops. Corn, which is considered a grass has little problems with deseases but a problem with many differant insects. The rule for most plants is not to plant more than two years in a row (preferably one) to break the pest cycle whether it is a fungus, mold or insect problem and wait another two years before planting it again in the same location or nearby. This is not fullproof, for many pests will linger in the soil or take tempopray residence like insects nearby. White mold (a fungus), which is the desease most associated with the brassica family will hit almost any broadleaf plant like soybeans,white beans, sugar beets, and all grains although not as severely. Perinnial and lingering wet locations are more susceptably for white mold along with a rainy growing season.

I have planted brassicas three years in a row in the same field to build up the soil with no problems. The key here is to plant buckwheat in early June and a brassica rye mix in early August. This is a very good formula for soil building. After the third year you should see a change in the color of a light soil to a much darker one and a much improved moisture and nutrient holding capabilitywith little or no pest problems not to mention excellant food plots during the process.

There is a lot to this subject but in a nutshell don't get alarmed about it for you are not growing hundreds of acres of crops. Use common sense and rotate to break any potential cycle if possible and be on the lookout for problems.

Many broadleaf plants that are planted in the spring will get hit by aphids (sucking pests) and chewing insects and may look like it is a disaster but they may recover and by late summer the plant should survive with holes in large leaves and not that bad looking after all. Deer seem to be not concerned about the looks of what they eat. Later (late summer) planted plots have less pests problems from fungus, mold and insects.

Mowing your lequmes will help lower the insect problem.

Keep the fun in hunting!
 
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