Michigan-Sportsman.com banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Say My Name.
Joined
·
14,731 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm curious if any members out there have some experience with the length of the useful life of bowstrings.

I'm shooting a Mathews Rival Pro with the Zebra twist string. I bought the bow new in May 1999 and I've launched approximately
700-800 arrows from it. It shoots perfectly.
I always keep the string well-waxed.

People in the business of selling bowstrings have told me that the string should be replaced every year, or perhaps every other year, depending on usage.

How do I know when it's time to replace the string?

I'm sure there are others out there with the same question.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
838 Posts
You know its time to replace the string when it begins to fray. You can wait quite a while though--but then again it'll probably snap when the big guy walks out. I also shoot a mathews--feather max--and it has a zebra string on it. I wouldn't use any other string. I'm currently on year 4 with the same string and shoot year round. It needs replacing now, but still has a little life in it. Waxing is the key to string life--don't let it get dried out, wears out much faster. Hope this helps ya out,

DaYoop
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
Farmlegend, I bought my Mathews in July '98 and I'm still using the same string. I had the pro shop look at it last summer because like you, I heard it should be replaced every year. They said it was fine even though they make strings which was nice of them. I try and wax mine about once a week when I shoot a lot during the summer and always wax after a hunt in the rain.

Tim

------------------


[This message has been edited by Tim Baker (edited 02-06-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,354 Posts
keep that string waxed and dont let your broadheads touch it and it should last for 4 or 5 years. If it begins to fray you know that its time for a replacement.

------------------
"In the wind he's still alive"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
FARMLEGEND,
Cool name what is the meaning behind it.
About the string thing,hey that rhymes. This is my take. A strings cost is minimal so if it needs it or not I replace it every year. Plus I always have a spare with me. If your string breaks while your hunting because you try to stretch its life that is just plain stupid. Plus if you have a spare string no matter where your at you can usually find a bow shop. But they won't always have the string you need. I make my own strings because I shoot a self bow one more benifit of the self bow I can make a string in the field.


HUNT SMART HUNT HARD

OSAGE2ORANGE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
CARE FOR YOUR BOW

1. Periodically examine your bow for wear or damage. If you hear any unusual noise or feel any unusual vibrations STOP shooting your bow and check it completely for any damage. If you cannot pin point the problems do not shoot the bow, take it to a Dealer to have it checked out. The noise may become a problem that could be costly.

2. Check your bowstring and cables frequently. If worn or frayed, replace. Most manufacturers recommend replacing strings and Synthetic cables every 12 to 18 months. Replace Metal cables every two or three years.

3. Never “DRY FIRE” your bow. If you accidentally mis-nock or dry-fire, check the bow and arrow thoroughly for possible damage. Replace any nocks with cracks or arrows that are bent.

4. Do not draw the bow past its designed draw length.

5. It is a state law that your bow must be in a case during transport.

6. Apply a light coat of bowstring wax to your bow’s string and synthetic cables on a regular basis. I suggest weekly during peak use seasons. Use a high quality bowstring wax with silicone base. We recommend Bohning SEAL-TITE bowstring wax.

7. Check your bow's cam synchronization periodically and have it adjusted if needed. Synchronization is very important in shooting tight groups.

8. Check your bow's cam timing periodically and have it adjusted if needed. Timing is very important for shooting tight groups and speed
.
9. NEVER allow your bow to be put into a center pulling bow press, as twisting the bow riser (handle) will result. Also turn the poundage to lowest setting on the quad limb bows, and Q2 type bows with short limbs.

10. Your bow is a mechanical device and as such, is subject to wear and need of periodic inspection, adjustment and service. I recommend that you bring your bow into your pro shop at least once a year for a yearly professional maintenance and inspection. Areas to be inspected are axles, spacers, lubrication of axle bushings, “E” clips, strings, cables, limbs and riser. Remember today’s bows shoot speeds that were never thought of just a few years ago.

11. Practice with your Broadheads before you go hunting. It’s a known fact that Broadheads and field point react differently at high speeds. If the Broadhead DOES NOT FLY GOOD, TRY ANOTHER Broadhead; it may fly great. If changing Broadheads does not help, bring your bow and a few arrows to Jay’s to see if we can help.

12. Remember to keep your bow away from any heat source that could damage it severely. Excessive heat, such as could be experienced on a sunny day inside a closed vehicle, could cause limb failure. The high heat also breaks down the new synthetic string and cable materials, allowing them to stretch. When shooting your bow outside in the heat, your bows synthetic cables and string can also stretch. As the string stretches, the poundage goes up. When the synthetic cables stretch the synchronization can be affected. Prolonged storage in a damp basement could also be damaging.

13. Keep your axles lubricated with good quality oil. Never use WD-40 or any other sprays that may contain a cleaning agent. If your eccentrics have needle bearings, do not oil them. The oil breaks down the grease that they are packed with and will cause wear or damage. I recommend using Snake Oil as a good quality lubricant.


------------------
Bowdoctor
http://communities.msn.com/archeryamerica
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top