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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had 10 acres planted to warm season grasses this year (switch, big blue stem, and indian). Within this 10 acres I put 4 small food plots-2 of them are 1/2 acre and 2 are 1/4 of an acre. Next spring I would like to plant some trees or shrubs around the perimeter of these plots to give the bucks somewhere to make scrapes.

Any suggestions on the best trees or shrubs for this? I realize it will take a few years for them to grow but wanted to see what you guys thought.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Bishs is the guy that can answer that.

I have used Norway spruce, tag alders, popular and autumn olive on my borders.
 

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:xzicon_sm
I had 10 acres planted to warm season grasses this year (switch, big blue stem, and indian). Within this 10 acres I put 4 small food plots-2 of them are 1/2 acre and 2 are 1/4 of an acre. Next spring I would like to plant some trees or shrubs around the perimeter of these plots to give the bucks somewhere to make scrapes.

Any suggestions on the best trees or shrubs for this? I realize it will take a few years for them to grow but wanted to see what you guys thought.

Thanks in advance.

Be careful about planting trees too close to WSG's if you plan on doing maintainance burns as the intense heat can badly damage or kill trees. Two ways around this are;

1) Plant a food plot buffer/fire lane in between the two.

2) Use Northern Pampas or Giant Miscanthus for a border which could also be spring burned. I have not had these species established long enough to know how well they serve for licking/scraping purposes, but I do know thier value for screening.

All of the trees Kozbow mentioned are good, just be mindful of your soil types (mother nature rules) and level of screening that you are trying to achieve before ordering trees.
 

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Mike, I'm a big fan of autumn olive around the perimeter of food plots. They provide good screening cover so the deer feel comfortable using the plots during daylight hours. Another advantage of aa is the bucks love to make scrapes beneath the overhanging branches. Autumn olive does best on well drained soil. I've planted them on clay soil that holds lots of moisture and some of them have died. The survivors have not grown as vigorously as the autumn olive that was planted on higher, drier ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Great advice guys. I do like the autumn olive at your place Mike. My only concern is whether or not the NRCS would have a problem with me planting them since this property is in a CRP program.

I am afraid to bring it up and have them say not to plant them--maybe I just plant a few and don't tell them? I guess I have time to think about it.
 
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