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Discussion Starter #1
strange thing happaned while fishing on hamlin lk. in ludington,my daughter caught a bluegill with a small lampery attached to it ,i've got both lampery and blue gill froze,plan to contact dnr never herd of lampery in inland water,or attaching to a blue gill, i've seen many thouhout the years on huron attached to salmon and trout,but a blue gill?
 

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Hello Gone Fishin (Larry) -

Hey I found this old post of yours and just wanted to let you know I saw the same thing on Hamlin Lake.

The Bluegill I saw with a lamprey on it was swimming by the Sable Resort dock on Lower Hamlin (by the South Bayou). This was back in the early 80’s. A bunch of us tried to catch it but it wouldn’t bite. It looked like it was on it’s last leg.

I practically fish the lake year around, and have never seen any like it since. “Hamilton Reef” also posted a report about a lamprey on a Hamlin Lake Tiger Musky.

Next time I go to the sand dunes...I'm staying out of the WATER! :D
 

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I used to fish the sable river near the county line east of hamlin and I cought a number of browns with lampreys on them ....that was 20 years ago. they were a real dark brown not colored like the ones ive seen in lake mi
 

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Discussion Starter #5
fishforbrains,
this one looked just like the ones I've takan in the big lake, just smaller.
 

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It was probbaly a chestnut lamprey, which do not grow much larger than the one that you caught. They are native to Michigan and not nearly as much of a problem as the non-native sea lamprey (the kind that decimated the lake trout population). Have caught a lot of trout with them attached and, from my understanding, do not actually kill the fish like the sea lamprey. Hope this helps....will do some research and let you know if I am off base with the above info.
 

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Here's a paragraph from a research paper on Sea Grant:

Two other parasitic lampreys, the chestnut lamprey and silver lamprey, are found in Michigan. Both differ from the sea lamprey in appearance by having a single, continuous dorsal fin with a slight notch, rather than two distinct dorsal fins. Both species also are much smaller than the sea lamprey, reaching an adult length of about nine and 12 inches, respectively. The larvae of the chestnut and silver lampreys are indistinguishable, but' the adults differ in the shape of the teeth in the suction-cup mouth. The circumoral (inner ring) of teeth of the chestnut lamprey are bicuspid (two points), whereas those of the silver lamprey are unicuspid (one point). Chestnut lampreys are only found on the west side of the state in Lake Michigan tributaries, whereas silver lampreys are found in the larger rivers flowing into Lake Huron and Lake Superior, and will migrate into the Great Lakes. Although both species feed on the blood of fish, they are less likely to kill their hosts than sea lampreys. Chestnut lampreys are abundant in some of Michigan's best trout streams, including the Manistee, Betsie and Big Sable rivers, but do not seem to affect fishing success. Because these species are endemic to the Great Lakes, and evolved with the native fishes, they are able to coexist with them.
 

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I've caught several Pike,in the Thornapple River,in the last 2 years with lamprey attached.One was a 33inch pike with a 12 inch lamprey.The pike was white from the sucker to the end of his nose,and didn't put up much fight.I,killed the lamprey and let the pike go.Icaught her again about 2 weeks later and she was doing better.This was between Vermontville & Potterville,and probably over a 100 river miles from the Lake Michigan.
 
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