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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is the standard gun blind to food plot distance? I am talking shooting with a 30-06. I know the closer the higher chances, but I am trying to reduce my exposure....what is the furthest you would position a permanent raised blind from a plot where you expect them to be? I have a great spot for it, but I am wondering if 200 yds is a little far?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The biggest consideration should be can you hunt, enter and exit the blind location without alerting deer to your presenence?
That is why I am asking. The edge of this group of pines where I want to put the blind is 200+ yds from my plot.
 

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As far as you can put the first shot from that 06 in a two inch target with a "normal" wind maybe.
And as close as not getting busted.

I'm content around 125 yards. But terrain and boundaries and deer traffic all factor.
I have been alright around the 50 yard mark. But deer traffic pattern changed and took over where I sat , so I moved back.

I'd want to be able to cover your entire plot unless deer only use part of it, but don't know the size you are looking at.
If deer traffic required it and the plot was big enough , you could end up in multiple places...
Even in the center.
 
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Here is my take on it for whatever it's worth. Your setting the person or persons sitting in the blind up for failure. If the plot is 50 yards square and the blind is 200 yards away essentially the expectation to shoot 225 to 250 yards is the norm. That means kids, old farts with adrenaline rush and high heart beats a minute need to make if they can even effectively see that far.

1 rain, snow, and fog can and have reduced visibility, not to mention low light situations.
2 at that distance it will be hard to determine if legal antler or judge size of deer or doe.
3 if hard to make or see early morning or late evening because of low light how are you going to see bucks circling just outside of food plot or chasing does, let alone be able to determine if legal to shoot especially on the 2nd tag or ristricted license?

These are a few things you should consider when contemplating where to set up or position a blind as far as distance. Accessibility, prominent wind direction, cover, shot access or shooting lanes outside of plot are other reasons as well.

Another which I need to expand on is if your dad, grandfather or elderly person wants to hunt that location or your children as well. The location should help them be successful not impede their success, IMO.

Ultimately it is your decision but if done correctly you should be able to bowhunt from it as well. Just because you do not bowhunt from it today you may tomorrow, unless you set it up which will prohibit its use for archery.
 

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Some very good observations already made. Here are a few of our box blinds. As mentioned by Luv2 above, all of the blinds can be accessed from the back side away from the food plots so that it is possible to enter and exit the blind even with deer in the plot (if you are stealthy, of course).

This particular plot is horseshoe shaped and 3.5 acres so you can not cover the entire plot with only 1 blind. We currently have 2 box blinds and have had as many as 2 tree stands around this plot as well. The blind in this photo was just placed there this year only days before the firearms opener...still in 4 or 5 sits from this blind our hunters saw 4 bucks aged 2 1/2 and older. There were also many turkeys and quite a few deer that walked by within easy bow and arrow range of the blind. We will very likely bow hunt here for turkeys this spring:

IMG_0019 (2).jpg


This is the view looking the other way from the blind. The camp you see in the background hasn't been used in many years.

IMG_3657.jpg


This post is on the NE portion of the same food plot. The far end of the plot is 200 yards from the blind so we like to have good shooters hunt from this blind - just in case, although 100 yard or closer shots are possible:

View attachment 371957

This is a view from about midway down the plot, inside the horseshoe. You can see the blind on top of the ridge to the NE of the deer.

IMG_0123 (1).jpg


This is another food plot with a blind that can be entered and exited with deer in the plot as the approach is from a ridge on the downwind (generally) side of the plot.

DSC00654.jpg


The majority of our rifle blinds (we currently have 11) are set up for shots of around 100 yards and most of them are not set up over food plots as our biggest bucks don't usually come from the food plot blinds. We actually had food plots with comfy, heated box blinds set up over them that nobody ever hunted this past year. We have never bow hunted from any of these box blinds. We usually set up portable pop-up blinds for bow hunting and turkey hunting. These blinds set up on food plots are excellent spots to manage our doe population - especially during muzzle loader season which we really enjoy.
 

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Some very good observations already made. Here are a few of our box blinds. As mentioned by Luv2 above, all of the blinds can be accessed from the back side away from the food plots so that it is possible to enter and exit the blind even with deer in the plot (if you are stealthy, of course).

This particular plot is horseshoe shaped and 3.5 acres so you can not cover the entire plot with only 1 blind. We currently have 2 box blinds and have had as many as 2 tree stands around this plot as well. The blind in this photo was just placed there this year only days before the firearms opener...still in 4 or 5 sits from this blind our hunters saw 4 bucks aged 2 1/2 and older. There were also many turkeys and quite a few deer that walked by within easy bow and arrow range of the blind. We will very likely bow hunt here for turkeys this spring:

View attachment 371951

This is the view looking the other way from the blind. The camp you see in the background hasn't been used in many years.

View attachment 371955

This post is on the NE portion of the same food plot. The far end of the plot is 200 yards from the blind so we like to have good shooters hunt from this blind - just in case, although 100 yard or closer shots are possible:

View attachment 371957

This is a view from about midway down the plot, inside the horseshoe. You can see the blind on top of the ridge to the NE of the deer.

View attachment 371961

This is another food plot with a blind that can be entered and exited with deer in the plot as the approach is from a ridge on the downwind (generally) side of the plot.

View attachment 371963

The majority of our rifle blinds (we currently have 11) are set up for shots of around 100 yards and most of them are not set up over food plots as our biggest bucks don't usually come from the food plot blinds. We actually had food plots with comfy, heated box blinds set up over them that nobody ever hunted this past year. We have never bow hunted from any of these box blinds. We usually set up portable pop-up blinds for bow hunting and turkey hunting. These blinds set up on food plots are excellent spots to manage our doe population - especially during muzzle loader season which we really enjoy.
Hey wild thing notice all your blinds are planted on the ground. This is because they are on a ridge or just for stealth entry? I have a blind now that is 75 yards off the plot but could have up to a 200 yard shot. Was thinking of moving it to within 10 yards on a little hill maybe 5 feet higher then the food plot. Walking up a ridge to get into blind. Should be good entry but contemplating raising it or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here is my take on it for whatever it's worth. Your setting the person or persons sitting in the blind up for failure. If the plot is 50 yards square and the blind is 200 yards away essentially the expectation to shoot 225 to 250 yards is the norm. That means kids, old farts with adrenaline rush and high heart beats a minute need to make if they can even effectively see that far.

1 rain, snow, and fog can and have reduced visibility, not to mention low light situations.
2 at that distance it will be hard to determine if legal antler or judge size of deer or doe.
3 if hard to make or see early morning or late evening because of low light how are you going to see bucks circling just outside of food plot or chasing does, let alone be able to determine if legal to shoot especially on the 2nd tag or ristricted license?

These are a few things you should consider when contemplating where to set up or position a blind as far as distance. Accessibility, prominent wind direction, cover, shot access or shooting lanes outside of plot are other reasons as well.

Another which I need to expand on is if your dad, grandfather or elderly person wants to hunt that location or your children as well. The location should help them be successful not impede their success, IMO.

Ultimately it is your decision but if done correctly you should be able to bowhunt from it as well. Just because you do not bowhunt from it today you may tomorrow, unless you set it up which will prohibit its use for archery.
All very good points- gotta keep different age ranges in mind for when the kids do start popping out, and for when I’m older. The differing weather conditions and light are also very good points. Thanks man! I will likely put it around 70 yds out to the SE and plant pine trees around it. That way I can bow hunt it to catch them on the way in and still have good shots with a rifle to the actual plot itself for does and such.
 

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Hey wild thing notice all your blinds are planted on the ground. This is because they are on a ridge or just for stealth entry? I have a blind now that is 75 yards off the plot but could have up to a 200 yard shot. Was thinking of moving it to within 10 yards on a little hill maybe 5 feet higher then the food plot. Walking up a ridge to get into blind. Should be good entry but contemplating raising it or not.
Yes - Our property is all hilly, rolling terrain with natural elevation features so all we do is set them on concrete blocks to keep them from rotting. We just built our first elevated stand this year, and although it is on higher ground, we wanted to use some existing conifers for cover so we raised it. Will post pics of that one later...
 
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