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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took booger out to bust some rabbits this morning. He did a great job, I would say the best day we ever had. He never really barked when he jumped rabbits until this year. He is three years old and I was kinda concerned he was never really going to be much of a rabbit dog until this year he really came around and has been hunting great! He barks on the jump circles great and really digs into the heavy brush.

He jumped many rabbits today and I was truly impressed until it came time to give up the second rabbit. He was not willing to let it go and tried bitting me several times to keep it. I finally got the rabbit after he dropped it in a brush pile and I could reach it from the other side of the brush.

When we returned to the house and I went to put him in the kennel he grabbed me by the hand and bit me several times. I had one heck of a time getting him to let go of my hand, Needlessly to say he broke skin several times through my gloves. I can not have a bitting dog around as I have several young children.

If someone thinks they can work with him or get some use out of him you are welcome to him and I will let him go. Otherwise I am sorry to say I will be putting him down. Feel free to let me know if anyone wants him.

Michael
 

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Get yourself one of those electronic collars,.... that will break the biting habit FAST!

I had a friend who use one for training his dogs,.. it turned them around quickly to listening to their master and his commands.
 

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Man That sucks. He's three and this is the first time he's bitten??

Are you sure he's not hurt in some way and consequently scared and in pain? I've seen some with voracious wounds that still hunt and act relatively normal, but are really hurting.

Have you had him since a pup or did you get him "used"?
 

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One of my beagles bit me once. ONCE! You'ld better teach him quick who's boss or you may not have a choice but to put him down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have had hime from a pup and he has always been protective of his food. Although he has groweled at me in the past I always made sure he knew I was the big dog. i am the only one in the family that he listens to and I can take food from hin and etc.
 

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You shouldn't have to "train" a dog not to bite.

I had a 1 1/2 yr. old beagle we raised from a pup. Never showed any signs of aggression and was good with my kids.... until one day he bit my son.

The very next day we ran an ad in the paper saying "Not suitable for children" and we gave him away. If noone would have took him I would have had no choice but to put him down.

I am with you 110%, Vandermi: Biting dogs deserve no second chance.... especially when there are kids around.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I can and will not take a chance that he will bite one of my daughters. That is the reason I am offering him up to someone else. Of course my father would have a fit if he thought I was giving a problem to someone else. He always just took care of this sort of thing on the spot.

If someone wants him and thinks they can prevent him from bitting again they are welcome to him. On the condition they recognize he has bitten me and I will not be responsible for his future actions.

Next weekend will be his last rabbit hunt unless someone takes him.

Michael
 

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It's not the dogs fault that you didn't train it when you first noticed the problem. This should have been taken care of when it was a pup. One way to curb the problem at the food dish is to keep food in it all the time. Not a lot just enough that the dog knows its not his last meal till tomorrow. Next bring some dog treats in the woods with you. When the dog brings a rabbit back clip your lead on him/her try to get the dog to drop the rabbit. If it doesn't work get the dogs attention with the treat and toss it next to the rabbit. When the dog takes the treat lead him/her away from the rabbit.
 

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Originally posted by vandermi
....... I always made sure he knew I was the big dog. i am the only one in the family that he listens to ......

IMHO, I think this is part of the problem. Yes, he knows you are alpha, but what about the rest of the family? One of the things my dogs know VERY well is that all humans are above them in hierarchy. It doesn't matter if it is me or my 4 yr old, they should do what we say without question. Any of my dogs knows if the kids tell them to do something or need to take something from them, that they better obey or face consequences. And not just from me, from the other humans as well. I had to train the kids how to discipline the dogs fairly as well. The dogs need to know their place with everyone.

Now in regards to your biter, I agree.....he probably has to go to another home. But I wouldn't say only to a home without kids. He can get a new lease on life and be placed in a home with some older kid(s) that can/will discipline him fairly and consistently and he may be just fine. If he is not outright attacking you or anyone else unprovoked, this sounds like a problem that can be corrected with someone who will be consistent with his training and let him know his place.

It doesn't sound like you are willing to take the chance and I can WHOLEHEARTEDLY respect that, but from what I have read, I think things aren't as bad as they seem.

I would also add that this situation is another good reason to get your dogs from respectable breeders who know their dogs and their bloodlines. Aggresion is something a breeder will know about in their bloodlines if they know their dogs. I realize this isn't always the available avenue, but if you were thinking of buying a dog, get it from someone who KNOWS their breed, their bloodlines, and offers guarantees.


My .02
 

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Sorry to hear about your dog, sounds like you have quite a situation on your hands. Unfortunately, you will never be able to trust this dog around your kids and you have outlined your options. If you decide to get a new dog their are plenty of things you can do to estalish dominancy over your dog, for your kids, wife or whoever you decide. One good way to do this with a pup is to put the dog on his back and hold him down until he stops struggling. Your kids can do this with a puppy to and it is a sure fire way to make sure your dog knows who is boss. Also, if your dog will not release on your command blow in his ear. If you blow lightly in his ear he will spit it right out (don't blow to gently or your dog will get the wrong impression). Make sure you praise him if he drops it. Hope you find a home for your dog and good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I appreciate everyones input. Some of the suggestions will help in the search and training of a replacement. And some were a little unrealistic, as I have an infant now and had an infant when we bought him, I dont think they were in a position to roll him over and show him who the boss is.

My concern still ends with the fact he bit me! He did not bite one of my daughters. I am the alpha and have always been the alpha. My concern is if he will challenge me, then he will have no problem challenging my daughters. I have performed most of the suggestions while raising him and will definently take into consideration all of the suggestions I have now.
 

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If he bit you once he's probably not afraid to bite you again. I'd put him in the kennel with one hand on the shotgun next time, just in case. my .02.

I love my dog more than I love alot of people, but if she bit somebody that wasn't askin for it, she'd die of lead poisoning. It would break my heart, but I'd have to do it. :(
 

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Grab his legs calf rope style and sit on his chest and letting him know he was in the wrong. Hold him there on his back for full couple of minutes and dont let up. If this doesnt educate him
he might have a parasite infection , tapworms and brainworm make them so hungry they lose theyre minds to get food and will guard it aggresively. I had a dog brought home that was loaded with worms and looked fat and normal all the time because of the bloating. If its not worms , Id give him away too.
 

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As long as the dog was properly socialized he should not be aggressive towards humans.

Unless he has something wrong with him like worms as Lunker said or maybe some other health problem.

But my guess is he was not breed properly.

Aggresiveness should never be breed into beagles.

They are not guard dogs and should never be breed if they show any aggression towards people.

You must have that dog fixed before you pass him on.

I would likely have him put down.

But thats me. I wouldn''t want any legal reprocutions from having him bite somebody.


Bottom line Beagles are not supposed to bite ever. If they do they were breed wrong. They are naturally submissive animals if properly breed and socialized.
 

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THat is very unusual for a beagle to bite but I have a female who tried to nip at me. Needless to say that is the last time she ever tried that. Beagles will learn some things quickly if taken care of right away. Some times discipline will other times a shock collar will work. If you are still interested in getting rid of him let me know through an email.
 
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