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I received this today from Jim Trinklein of the MAGBHP. This is very important information. If you are a GAME BIRD BREEDER or GAME BIRD PRESERVE, you should not only read this and all of the links carefully, but you should join BOTH of these organizations for your future well being. This BIRD FLU will change the way we all do business ... it is an EPIDEMIC already.


Members,

This is the latest email I received from NAGA about the Bird Flu. This bird Flu could change the gamebird industry as we know it today. The North American Gamebird Association (NAGA) is on the front line of information for Avian Influenza. I would suggest if you are not a member of NAGA that you join ASAP, you need the information and they need your support.

Thanks,

Jim


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: North America Gamebird Association <[email protected]>
Date: Thu, Jun 4, 2015 at 2:04 PM
Subject: NAGA Avian Influenza Update
To: [email protected]
Cc: [email protected]


NAGA Economic Research Update: Southwick Associates has completed the survey phase of the gamebird business that is being funded by the National Shooting Sports Foundation. They have now begun to work on the analysis of the data, which will be a great help for our industry to explain the economic value of our businesses. Thanks to all who took the time to take the survey. Next week we will announce one of the respondents who will win a $1,000 gift certificate for products from the Kuhl Corporation. Thanks to the folks at Kuhl for their generous donation!

When it comes to avian influenza, backyard flocks are a big concern for folks in the gamebird business. Many owners of hobby and backyard flocks are not affiliated with organizations that provide good educational materials about the steps they can take to prevent an outbreak on their property. What happens on your neighbor’s place, however, can have a huge impact on your place. Whether the disease spreads to your place from a sloppy operator or you wind up in a quarantine zone, either way your business suffers. That is why it is important to make sure neighboring owners of backyard or hobby flocks have good information. They may not understand or care about your birds, but they will likely be more interested to know information that can protect and save theirs. Take the time to educate your neighbors. Dr. Rocio Crespo, of Washington State University has provided a list of tips from the USDA along with her own commentary that will help you take this important step. www.mynaga.org/wp-content/assets/2015/06/Tips-for-Backyard-Flocks.pdf


Waterfowl continue to be the main suspect for the initial outbreaks of Avian Influenza. Soon, wild birds will be moving south once again, making it important to know how best to keep waterfowl from coming into contact with your birds. NAGA Health Committee member John Metzer provided this informative webinar from U.S. Poultry. You will be required to submit your name and email to view it, but the information is important enough to do that. Mitigating waterfowl congregation within farm premises, presented by Shannon Chandler and Clint Turnage from USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services


Last, NAGA News editor Peg Ballou provides a handy tip sheet called Avian Influenza Preparedness from the Ohio Department of Agriculture that deals with procedures on your farm from equipment to personnel, from food supplies to who to have on your telephone contact list. www.mynaga.org/wp-content/assets/2015/06/Ohio-Avian-Influenza-Preparedness.pdf

To view more articles distributed by NAGA on Avian Influenza, visit www.mynaga.org/avian-influenza/


Rob Sexton
NAGA Executive Director
[email protected]



--
Jim Trinklein
Michigan Assoc of Gamebird Breeders
& Hunting Preserves
6028 Moores Junction Rd
Sterling, MI. 48659
989-654-2656
[email protected]
www.michiganhuntingpreserves.com
 

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I see that the Wolf lake swap meet, in Ligonner Indiana has banned all birds from even being on the grounds.
Are swap meets in Michigan doing this?
These meets have in the past been good places to procure training birds.

Can game birds and pigeons still cross state lines??
That could cause some real issues for shooting preserves and trial clubs.
 

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I would think birds can't be moved.
I work in healthcare and our food service dept can't even get eggs right now.
The article we got from our vendor says 20 million laying hens have been destroyed. That's hard to imagine however boilers are not being effected for some reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
HOW WILL THIS AFFECT MICHIGAN?: The out-of-state bird suppliers will be one of the largest problems for the Michigan preserves and others who use game birds. The entire nation's largest supplier of Pheasants is in one of the hardest hit states with this bird flu. Many preserves and clubs in Michigan get their gamebirds from out-of-state, as well. This epidemic and the ramifications, may put some preserves out of business. The ones who may be able to survive with the least problems would be the preserves and trainers who raise their own birds?

This is very serious for even the small time trainers and bird breeders in Michigan. Things could get very ugly for anyone who needs birds this coming season (preserves, trainers, dog owners, clubs), especially when there may be strict government protocols that will most likely create a very limited supply of birds in Michigan.

We do not raise our own birds and we instead bring them in (already grown / strong fliers) from quality breeders out-of-state. In a nutshell, if we cannot get birds, (Chukar or Pheasant) ... we cannot train or hunt birds, either. If supplies are limited, I would imagine that there will be many others that will be in the exact same situation, as well.
 

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HOW WILL THIS AFFECT MICHIGAN?: The out-of-state bird suppliers will be one of the largest problems for the Michigan preserves and others who use game birds. The entire nation's largest supplier of Pheasants is in one of the hardest hit states with this bird flu. Many preserves and clubs in Michigan get their gamebirds from out-of-state, as well. This epidemic and the ramifications, may put some preserves out of business. The ones who may be able to survive with the least problems would be the preserves and trainers who raise their own birds?

This is very serious for even the small time trainers and bird breeders in Michigan. Things could get very ugly for anyone who needs birds this coming season (preserves, trainers, dog owners, clubs), especially when there may be strict government protocols that will most likely create a very limited supply of birds in Michigan.

We do not raise our own birds and we instead bring them in (already grown / strong fliers) from quality breeders out-of-state. In a nutshell, if we cannot get birds, (Chukar or Pheasant) ... we cannot train or hunt birds, either. If supplies are limited, I would imagine that there will be many others that will be in the exact same situation, as well.
When the logistics of inventory movement is conflicted the market will suffer.
Chicks are coming off the incubators all over the Mid-west right now the operator that morphs and changes his operation could make out quite well.
Rearing local chicks up flight birds may be the only way for some operators to make it through this current crisis.
 

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This article is an eye-opener about how quickly this virus can spread. It is about a major bird supplier that tested POSITIVE for the bird flu: "The facility in Iowa shipped birds and eggs to almost 75 percent of the country in the weeks before the initial testing.

Bird flu is a highly contagious viral disease that affects chickens, turkeys, pheasants, ducks, quail, geese and many wild birds. Direct contact with infected birds, contaminated objects/equipment, and even droplets in the air can spread the virus."

Read more: http://www.kpho.com/story/29301321/bird-flu-in-arizona-4-az-facilities-quarantined#ixzz3ctVVkGqP
 

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can this effect the grouse population and has it already
This is an ongoing chart of all WILD BIRD cases (74) that have been CONFIRMED in the US since December 2014 which when it was first detected. All of the WILD BIRDS and their breeds are noted. None are grouse so far. Seems to mainly be ducks and geese with a handful that were either a hawk, falcon, owl or eagle. Please report any DEAD BIRDS that you do find to the proper authority to be checked.


http://www.aphis.usda.gov/wildlife_damage/downloads/WILD%20BIRD%20POSITIVE%20HIGHLY%20PATHOGENIC%20AVIAN%20INFLUENZA%20CASES%2
 

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MacFarlane Pheasants, Inc has been in the game bird business since 1929 and has grown to be the largest pheasant producer in North America.They produce 1.6 million day old pheasant chicks annually and ship them worldwide. Below is what they are doing to prevent a BIRD FLU outbreak at their facilities. It is unbelievable ...

https://www.pheasant.com/resources/supportfaq/avianinfluenzaprecautions.aspx
 

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This website explains this BIRD FLU very simply so that you can understand what it is and what it is not. This website lists ALL of the poultry outbreaks over the first 6 months of this US detected bird flu. It is listed by dates and locations with the kind and number of POULTRY birds affected at each CONFIRMED US location so far. It has already affected over 47 million US poultry birds from both commercial and backyard operations with as little as 10 birds to 4.9 million affected at separate noted locations nationwide.

USDA APHIS | Animal Health
 

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I think most producers are doing their best to take precautions. The main changes we have made with the birds is when some get out they are removed where we used to catch what we could and put back in pens. The biggest changes have come with how we deal with customers. They are no longer allowed to look at incubator room, brooder barns, or the flight pens. Most understand, I think a couple think I am being paranoid, but so be it. I feel like its out of my hands now. My biggest concern is neighboring farms with free ranging poultry with a lot less to lose than me. If they get bird flu on there property, whether I do or not, it shuts me down. Theirs if for fun, mine for profit. I tried to talk to them about bird flu, but it was like talking to a wall. They had no concerns about it, if they got it they would just get more next year.:rant: Oh well, I have done what I can, now cross my fingers, prepare for the worst, hope for the best. Lets just hope for some warmer weather to slow this thing down.
 

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My biggest concern is neighboring farms with free ranging poultry with a lot less to lose than me. If they get bird flu on there property, whether I do or not, it shuts me down. Theirs if for fun, mine for profit. I tried to talk to them about bird flu, but it was like talking to a wall. They had no concerns about it, if they got it they would just get more next year.:rant: Oh well, I have done what I can, now cross my fingers, prepare for the worst, hope for the best. Lets just hope for some warmer weather to slow this thing down.
You can probably thank this article for that.

http://www.naturalnews.com/049905_bird_flu_factory_farming_chicken_health.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Recently, the DNR sent out a SPECIAL MAILING to Licensed Wildlife Permittees. We received it because we are a DNR Licensed Preserve. It is regarding the BIRD FLU that has been found in Michigan and that is spreading across our country. It was a very detailed three page double-sided frequently asked questions and a DNR cover letter dated June 11, 2015 about this situation.

In a nutshell, the cover letter on DNR letterhead, had the following paragraph in BOLD WRITING:

"At this time, we do not have an importation ban on native birds. However, the importation of birds is still a threat to our native population and poultry farms throughout the state. Please make sure you obtain the proper Health Certificate of Veterinarian Inspection for all birds prior to importation."

They also said to call the Wildlife Disease Hotline at 517-336-5030 if you find any birds in the wild exhibiting signs of the disease.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
JULY 2015 UPDATE: We have been hearing RUMORS(?) from some of our Field Trial and Hunt Test clients that Ohio is cracking down due to the BIRD FLU and will be canceling the DOG EVENTS that require birds. I also spoke with a very reliable source that says he heard the same thing, as well. I am curious if anyone else is experiencing this situation with any of the DOG EVENTS in other regions nationwide?
 

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Here's what NAVHDA has put out as the Invitational is scheduled to be held in Ohio this year.

Update on the 2015 Invitational - Mingo Sportsmans Club

Rumors have begun to be passed around regarding the status of the 2015 Invitational. Please note the following facts:
• The State of Ohio's Agriculture Department is taking a proactive approach to ensure that their poultry industry is not affected by the recent increase in avian flu.
◦ The Ag Department has issued a ruling that basically does not allow the co-mingling of birds in the State. Their statement is focused on State and County Fairs, bird shows, swap meets, etc. The statement does not mention dog related events (trials, tests, etc.)
• NAVHDA has been issued a permit to hold the Invitational - dated June 23, 2015 - from the State of Ohio DNR
• Last week, we received an "unofficial" statement from the Agricultural Department that states they may be stepping in and stopping dog tests, trials, and released shoots. Again, as a preventative measure to avoid the spread of avian flu
• At this point, the State of Ohio (DNR or Ag Dept) has NOT revoked our permit to hold the test.
The EC, NAVHDA's Legal Counsel, and representatives from the Buckeye Chapter are all working diligently to clarify our status with the State of Ohio. As soon as we have concrete answers we will communicate with all NAVHDA Members and Invitational Participants.

Please know that we do, as handlers ourselves, understand the implications of these issues so please be patient while we get this worked out. The EC will have all of you who may be affected by this on our minds as we sort through the details and make decisions on how to proceed.
 
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can this effect the grouse population and has it already
Grouse and, presumably, woodcock* can be infected. But they are not impacted nearly as much as, say, 500,000 chickens in one huge barn. Their solitary nature helps and greatly minimizes the spread. All current evidence suggests that grouse populations will not be significantly impacted. According to a June 8th MDNR press release there were no domestic flocks infected yet in the state and just a handful of wild geese that tested positive. If the grouse population was taking a hit I would expect there to be more going on with waterfowl and the domestic birds. Having said all this it isn't like a grouse dying in the woods outside of hunting season gets noticed by too many people. If you see something unusual it may be worth reporting here:

http://michigan.gov/emergingdiseases/0,4579,7-186-38757-141320--,00.html

But the state only tests for avian influenza under these criteria: Only sick or dead waterfowl, gulls or shorebirds will be laboratory tested for avian influenza; and only if they are from a die-off (a die-off is defined as 6 or more birds found sick or dead in a short time period. Waterfowl are a primary carrier of AI and certainly flock together more than grouse or woodcock so this is not surprising.

Overall, it is worth monitoring in the wild upland bird population and clearly is a major concern for the preserves and trainers but personally I put this pretty far down the list of things that I worry about in regards to wild grouse and woodcock populations in Michigan.

*I can only find one study that looked at woodcock. They tested 39 birds and none were found to be infected with AI. Not exactly a huge sample size there. If anyone has seen something else please post it. I would guess that woodcock have a higher chance of getting infected than grouse due to their migratory nature, higher likelihood of being in areas with waterfowl, and potential roosting/singing in fields shared with domestic poultry. But as far as I know nobody has looked at these things so it is all speculation.
 
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