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I still prefer the crimps. I make my stingers out of 25 lb test green big game, so they are plenty strong. I pulled in a 100 lb sturgeon in by the stinger last Spring, no issues. Plus, I like the fact that the thicker line is stiffer, so it tends to run straight back by the tail of the bait.
 

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I made a little jig up for tying stingers using old piece of 2x4 and nails. After my loop is tied, i remove the nail , slide tied loop off nail then dip loop in liquid electrical tape. When i need to add a stinger i poke barb from jig hook through loop of the now dried liquid electrical tape. Looks just like the ones you buy in store.
 

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I still prefer the crimps. I make my stingers out of 25 lb test green big game, so they are plenty strong. I pulled in a 100 lb sturgeon in by the stinger last Spring, no issues. Plus, I like the fact that the thicker line is stiffer, so it tends to run straight back by the tail of the bait.
I agree but I use the masons hard line, even stiffer yet....
 

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I still prefer the crimps. I make my stingers out of 25 lb test green big game, so they are plenty strong. I pulled in a 100 lb sturgeon in by the stinger last Spring, no issues. Plus, I like the fact that the thicker line is stiffer, so it tends to run straight back by the tail of the bait.
Use that in dirtier water in the D but not sure I'd like it in the SCR when it's super clean... Never have an issue with 12# flouro for mine
 

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Ive never used crimps, I just tie the tag end in 2 overhand knots as a stopper then make another overhand knot and cinch it down onto a jig. Never a breakoff or lost fish, the double overhand knot holds great and if anything they break at the hook and not the jig end. Tie a improved clinch knot for the treble hook. There simple to tie up on the fly if needed. Store them in a rifle cartridge box for easy access, the bigger the round the the better as thats what she said as well...
 

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Ive never used crimps, I just tie the tag end in 2 overhand knots as a stopper then make another overhand knot and cinch it down onto a jig. Never a breakoff or lost fish, the double overhand knot holds great and if anything they break at the hook and not the jig end. Tie a improved clinch knot for the treble hook. There simple to tie up on the fly if needed. Store them in a rifle cartridge box for easy access, the bigger the round the the better as thats what she said as well...
How easy are they to take on and off? That's the main thing that I like about the crimps. You just crimp one side and then you can put them on and take them off easily when you need to replace your plastic body.
 

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I do a variant to what Sharkbait does. Instead of teh overhand knot I I use a simple slip knot. Tightens up easy on the shank and I can slip a fingernail under it and open back up to replace a body or what not.

Easy peasy
 

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How easy are they to take on and off? That's the main thing that I like about the crimps. You just crimp one side and then you can put them on and take them off easily when you need to replace your plastic body.
You just pinch the double knot and pull and they come right off, tie one up and try it. Im going to order some crimps over the winter and try that as well and see what I like best.
 

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I may have to do that. If you go with crimps, just make sure you use at least 15 lb test. Flouro or green mono is pretty invisible anyway, so the weight doesn't really matter to the fish. I made a small jig from a 1-foot piece of 2 x 6 to tie them with so that they always end up a consistent length. A finish nail on one side and a small screw on the other, about 3 inches apart. Tie the hook on first and hook it around the screw, run the line through one side of the crimp, around the nail and back through the crimp. Tie an overhand knot in the line as tight to the crimp as possible. Slide it off the nail and crimp the side of the crimp with the knot in it, leaving the other side open. Once I get going, it only takes 20-30 seconds per stinger and most of that time is tieing the hook on.
 

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I may have to do that. If you go with crimps, just make sure you use at least 15 lb test. Flouro or green mono is pretty invisible anyway, so the weight doesn't really matter to the fish. I made a small jig from a 1-foot piece of 2 x 6 to tie them with so that they always end up a consistent length. A finish nail on one side and a small screw on the other, about 3 inches apart. Tie the hook on first and hook it around the screw, run the line through one side of the crimp, around the nail and back through the crimp. Tie an overhand knot in the line as tight to the crimp as possible. Slide it off the nail and crimp the side of the crimp with the knot in it, leaving the other side open. Once I get going, it only takes 20-30 seconds per stinger and most of that time is tieing the hook on.
What size and style crimp - single or double sleeve?
 

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Seaguar flourorcarbon In 25 lb, keeps the leader stiff. I use crimps on both ends. One hook side crimped down to let the hook move about in the loop and other end a slide crimp. For me, I have found this the best method. Come off easy enough when they need to but not too easily as other methods. Keeps the stinger straight towards the backside of the bait where it needs to be and doesn’t twist up like lighter line can do. Personally bad luck with slip knots on stingers and bobber stops. I’ve came up with too many jigs missing a stinger that route. Stiff line and crimps, won’t be disappointed


Sent from my iPhone using Michigan Sportsman
 

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Seaguar flourorcarbon In 25 lb, keeps the leader stiff. I use crimps on both ends. One hook side crimped down to let the hook move about in the loop and other end a slide crimp. For me, I have found this the best method. Come off easy enough when they need to but not too easily as other methods. Keeps the stinger straight towards the backside of the bait where it needs to be and doesn’t twist up like lighter line can do. Personally bad luck with slip knots on stingers and bobber stops. I’ve came up with too many jigs missing a stinger that route. Stiff line and crimps, won’t be disappointed


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The downside Ive found with tying knots in the line, some can can get a bend in it which can put the stinger in an akward position on the bait. I think a crimp will help keep it straight back like you mentioned. I normally use 20lb mono for the stingers for the rigidity.
 

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I've always preferred this way, seems easiest, takes less than 30 seconds, no crimps or extra tackle or tools needed. You can make a jig though to make them all the exact same size if you prefer but if you tie up enough you get good at making them all about the same size and if you watch the video you'll see no jig is really necessary.

 

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I've always preferred this way, seems easiest, takes less than 30 seconds, no crimps or extra tackle or tools needed. You can make a jig though to make them all the exact same size if you prefer but if you tie up enough you get good at making them all about the same size and if you watch the video you'll see no jig is really necessary.

Thats how I first learned was that video, I just modified it for my own preference by making 1 line instead of 2 and using the improved clinch knot instead of looping it around the hook eye. Both ways work great though. Thanks for posting video I was looking for it a while back and couldn't find it.
 
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