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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Browning compound bow and shoot carbons with a 60lb draw weight,and a Darton Excel shooting carbons also, the Darton is in the shop for a new string and a few extra's:D. The question is which is a better bow? I shoot them both and they both shoot fine. I've also read that 60# is a good draw weight.What is the best draw weight for whitetails and why?
Thanks in advance.
 

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I'm sure you'll get alot of answers here by alot of guys who know more than me about bow shooting. I'd say what ever you feel most comfortable shooting is what you'l shoot best. You can ge away with 50lbs, and I've even heard of less killing a dear, when placed properly. From what I've gathered, You'll want to be shooting at least 60lbs+ for mechanicals.

As for myself, I like to shoot the heaviest poundage I can while still being comfortable and being able to controll the bow (draw and shot) nice and relaxed. Good luck.

Al
 

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I think that 45# is what michigan says you must have. The biggest thing - Dont over bow yourself. 60 - 70# will blow through any deer in michigan
 

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Poundage is all relative to your accuracy, individual bow, and what you like to "tell" people you pull;)

For example, I used to shoot a 1989 PSE Fireflight at 75#'s. My current Mathews Ultra II will shoot the same arrow, the same speed, at 58#'s. So what's more "macho"....shooting my old PSE so I could say I shoot 75#'s, or shooting my Mathews Ultra at 60#'s?

I'd say you shoot for a few months with your bow before the season, slowly building the pounds within your comfort range, and then back 10#'s off the bow weight and go hunting. I shoot a ton, but still only hunt with my bow at around 62#'s. At the same time I went an entire 3D season 2 years ago shooting 70#'s. I literally shot 1000's of arrows for 7-8 months before hunting season at 70#'s, but switched back to around 62 for hunting. I was using a heavier, large diameter arrow and needed the weight to get my speed up, but it took a toll on my body, with some pretty noticable aches and pains in my wrist, neck, shoulder and back by the end of the season.

Find out what is your comfortable max in your yard, and then drop down from there to go hunting.
 

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I'm with NJ.

I used to shoot 70# all day but after you get comfortable with that. Going down a notch (I currently shoot 63#) really adds a lot of stamina to your shooting sessions. It will also help if you get stuck at full draw while hunting. A while back we were up north when the neighbor ( who lets his underage son bowhunt) came home with a doe. Put the bow on a scale and it was 29#. Sounds crazy but its true. Anyway good luck with whatever poundage you choose.
 

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I know a guy who's sons all shot their first deer at the age of 10. They all shot 30#'s at that age, and the first two I was actually able to witness by video. The first one, they were both crying when they recovered the deer they were so happy, and the 2nd, because of several mishaps captured on film before the actual shot, it was more of a comedy. But either way, they were a great testament to the power of a bow....legal or not!

On the other hand, I was hunting with a friend in the U.P. and he came back with a dejected look at the end of the night with a story of a nice doe coming by and his bow was to heavy of a pul to draw the bow in the 10 degree temps-what a moron!:)
 

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Fred Bear, is it 45lbs or 35lbs? I am too lazy to scan the guide for it..

but to answer the question choose a draw weight that you are completely comfortable with, being accurate after 10 shots is a bonus. I know the first shot counts, but you have to add in getting setup, placing a stand, hauling all your gear up.

Like NorthJeff said, the colder it is, the harder your bow is to draw. And not only that, get your cable guide wet, then cold and try to pull it... it is like adding 10lbs right there.
 

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Everyone is different. So I'll just say what ever draw weight you feel comfortable with and make sure your shooting the right arrow set-up for that weight. Remember to stay at least 5lbs away from the min. and max. draw weight. That is where the bow will shot the best.

As for the better bow, You decide. Which one do you feel better with. That is what matters the most.
 

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UnkaD,

Like all have said make sure you are comfortable with weight. Even more important than the weight on your bow is your arrow flight. Make sure that your bow is tuned and your arrows are flying true. This has as much or more impact on arrow penetration than the draw weight IMO. You want all of the energy in your arrow driving the broadhead into the animal and not off to the side of it. Also like mentioned your broadheads can never be sharp enough.

I would rather shoot a propoerly tuned 50# bow with arrows flying like darts that a 65# bow with the arrows flapping like a fish when in flight.

Good luck this season.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the advise. I've decided to set both bows to 62#'s and tune and paper tune both bows and by the time Oct. 1st gets here I should be able to decide which bow I prefer.
 

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Compounds shoot better when there maxed out.

If you buy a 60 pound bow you should shoot it at or as close to 60 pounds as possible.

The same goes for a 70 pound or 80 pound bow.

I buy 70 pound bows and max them out.

Usually they end up around 73-75 pounds.

I say shoot 10 pounds less than what you can comfortably draw.
 

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Keep this in mind: more than one individual that I consider an expert in matters concerning archery and bowhunting have independently volunteered to me the following:

1. 75% or more of all bowhunters are hunting with too much poundage; and

2. probably an even higher percentage of bowhunters are using a draw length which is too long for them.

I believe both are likely true.
 
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