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does anybody have any advice for me (a beginner) to get me a coyote. there is some in my property behind my house and i wanna get em out of there. it is a cut bean feild with woods on one side and a horse farm on the other side with hay feilds in the back of their property. i would love to trap somethin this winter bc i am yet to get 1 last year (my first year of starting). any help would be appreciated.

thanks in advance
 

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I would recommend locating where they are traveling........then use a dirt hole, flat set or haybale sets...........at different areas in their travel routes..........
 

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Dirthole set. Dead stinky meat is a good bait like woodchuck or some deer bits you did'nt use. Make sure you wear rubber gloves to cover your scent- A bit of fox piss sprayed around help's to cover scent too.
 

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What size foothold trap would it be? What type of material do you put down so the trap does not freeze?

I have been thinking about doing some trapping as well and getting my boys involved.
 

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For coyotes a 1 3/4 will do double staked. No. 2's are better if you have them.....I use the chaff from the barn floor, either from straw or hay...... the fine stuff works great for covering the trap . The larger chaff works for bedding the trap...... Have fun and good luck.....P.S. Got my son into trapping this year and we spend more time together trapping than we did before.....
 

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Alright, now I have to know what brand is the best and there are so many different names for the foot hold traps I don't know what what.

Also, is there anything else you need to get with the foot holds other than the stakes. I see so many different swivels and attachments that I can't make heads or tales of it.
 

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IMO the best are Victors........ Crush proof swivel mid chain with a double stake swivel at the end. I did buy 1/2 dozen Duke's 1 3/4 at the convention... with a liitle work they are good.. Caught my first coyote in this year....perfect pad catch........... If you are buying new they will need to have factory oil removed light coat of rust on them and dyed at a min.........
 

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Tom Moranda has a few good books for beginners, the fox & coyotes one is very usefull and tells all you'll need to know to get going. I have had it for years and still read it. He gives many different sets ,plus all your tools.
 

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THE HOLE SET
The hole set works just fine for me, and is the easiest set I know of. Keep in mind that you have to do like Bill Murray said in caddy shack…..”in order to catch a varmint, you have to think like a varmint, and when ever possible….to look like one”! lol After all the hole set is intended to copy a canine’s habit of burying food which they intend to eat later. And they always pee next to their stuff to mark that it is theirs.

1. Get permission to trap from a land owner and do allot of scouting. You should also make sure you can tell the difference between a domestic dog track and a yote track.

2. Find a good flat area close to the coyote’s travel run to make your set. Using a trowel or skinny shovel dig a mock fox or coyote hole (usually) on a descent angle, around 12-16” deep, but not too wide, around 4” x 4” will do fine. Place the excavated soil on a piece of clean plastic or a 5 gal. bucket to use later.

3. Begin digging a spot for the trap to rest, I like to have the trap 6-8” from the hole entrance and off 4-6” to the right or left of the center of the hole. (We are looking to place it where we will get a clean 1 front paw catch.)

4. Put your stake directly under where the trap will set, about 3” lower than the surface of where you will set the trap. Pack soil over the stake to create a hard surface for the trap to rest, and pack the outer jaws with soil to make sure the trap doesn’t wobble or move when you press on each jaw. Cover the trap pan with something to prevent the trap pan from being held up from backfilled dirt which will NOT allow for clean downward travel. Some people use wax paper, some use cellophane or other material like buckwheat shells…I use wax paper most of the time

5. Using a sifter box, begin lightly covering the trap to re-create a flat smooth ground surface. Use a stick to reshape the disturbed area and strategically cover exposed dirt with native leaves, grasses and small twigs and the soil you excavated earlier. I will also try to place a few directional sticks or stones to encourage the yote to step precisely where the pan is.

6. Place a small amount of rotted meat into the back of the hole, and then cram some native grasses or leaves in to make the animal work to reach it.

7. Add a backing rock or larger branch to the backside of the hole, this will encourage the animal to go in…the way you want him to. Finally….place a good amount of coyote or fox urine on the branch/rock, about 10-20 drops.

This is the basic way I make this set when the ground is NOT frozen. There are other post in this forum which speak of winterizing a set using trappers anti-freeze, waxed soils, and ant hill soils as well. Winter tactics are different from fall practices, which is a very important factor this time of year.
GOOD LUCK!!:D
 
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