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Here's the situation; we have a 32x48 pole barn with a dirt floor. The dirt is so fine, it's like talcum powder. It gets everywhere! We've already built a couple of 2x6 wood platforms to use as our Kubota parking space (needed a hard / flat area to remove the belly mower) and a workshop area. Our plan is to get about 20 yds of aggregate to cover the remaining dirt to about 5" deep. We plan on moving our travel trailer in the barn over the winter and camping in the trailer 1-2x a month. One issue we have is our our trailer is about 2" to tall for our barn door, so we plan to dig out about 4-6" below the door "apron" area to allow the trailer to get inside. Once the trailer is in the barn we'll push the stone back under the door to keep wind & vermin out. Then in the spring, pull the stone back down and pull the trailer back out for the season.

Question: What type of aggregate should we use? The local concrete yard has several types:
6AA (crushed washed limestone 3/8" - 1" $37/yd) This was their first recommendation.
Stonecrete (crushed limestone with dust $33.50/yd) Their other recommendation.

Other types available:
6A round stone washed $28.50/yd
Crushed concrete: $18/yd
Drain stone washed: $28.50/yd
Pea gravel washed: $26.50/yd
60/40 stone & sand blend

Our other project involves trying to smooth out our driveway that goes through a small (about 100') pine forest with some tree roots 1-3" exposed. I'm trying to avoid the possible snow plow damage of the roots and lessen the "speed bump" effect. Hopefully only adding 2-3" of stone to even things out. The aggr yard recommended crushed concrete for this, but online research shows that may suffocate the roots and damage the trees. Mulch or wood-chips was the online recommendation. Thoughts on material for this as well?
 

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Pea pebble, drain stone, river rock are to be avoided. Sucks to walk on. Sucks to drive equipment on. Will never compact or lock together. Dolomite or limestone are best. Start with a base layer of 1-3" stone. Roll or compact it. then go over that with a 21AA limestone. compact it, wet it, compact again. Go back in 90 days, compact it again, wet it . Add material to high traffic areas as needed, compact it again rewet it. You will have a virtually maintenance free floor from that point unless you are turning tandem axles on it..
 

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Go with crushed concrete base and compacted damp. Top dress with The 6aa and compact. Also place the 6aa where you want to remove at door . much easier than the compacted crushed concrete. The 6aa is washed and will eliminate dust.
 

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It might be more expensive, but it could be a permanent fix. Put in two doors. Assuming the doors would be on the 32' side, put in a standard overhead door for normal use and a slider on the other side for your trailer. Lower the floor on the slider side, and extend the bottom of the slider to close it to the outside. Now you can put in a solid concrete floor across the whole barn with just one portion lowered for the trailer. Put in a good drain in the lower side and step(s) up to the main floor.
 

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Thanks for all the replies. I think I'm going to go with KisherFisher's idea of layering the crushed concrete on the base minus the apron area. That'll save a couple hundred bucks as well.
 

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I am just about within a week putting the pad in for my new barn. Has anybody put plastic down before the pad? I will be using 21AA cracked stone, no way Limestone as stated even though it is cheaper around here. To the original poster, do you not have any gravel pits around you, you are paying pretty heavy price.
 

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plastic would be a good idea under your gravel base if that is the finished product.

I built a smaller pole barn this year on a gravel pad. I did not take into account the amount of moisture it holds without a moisture barrier under the limestone.

I will be placing a barrier on my current base and then placing another few inches of gravel in the spring.
 

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I wonder what is the recommended plastic.
 

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Pea pebble, drain stone, river rock are to be avoided. Sucks to walk on. Sucks to drive equipment on. Will never compact or lock together. Dolomite or limestone are best. Start with a base layer of 1-3" stone. Roll or compact it. then go over that with a 21AA limestone. compact it, wet it, compact again. Go back in 90 days, compact it again, wet it . Add material to high traffic areas as needed, compact it again rewet it. You will have a virtually maintenance free floor from that point unless you are turning tandem axles on it..
This is the way to go, I have a 40x60 barn and I did everything like this except wet it. It is solid. I also put road grade fabric under my large stone, no plastic in my barn with zero issues.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I am just about within a week putting the pad in for my new barn. Has anybody put plastic down before the pad? I will be using 21AA cracked stone, no way Limestone as stated even though it is cheaper around here. To the original poster, do you not have any gravel pits around you, you are paying pretty heavy price.
I wondered about that too. The concrete yard is only a few miles from our property, so the delivery is cheaper. Some places that I called before were 30 min away and delivery was a lot more. I'll call around a bit more.

im curious how much are you guys saving vs a poured floor?
In my case the total cost of the gravel and delivery for the barn is $1000. For us to have concrete put in was minimum of $4000, most likely closer to $4500-5000. And for us trying to match the height of the platforms and account for the door height issues causes a lot of headaches.

Current platforms: IMG_20191020_152404.jpg IMG_20191020_152434.jpg IMG_20190523_185934.jpg
 

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Just remember crushes concrete can have metal in it , so it is not recommended if you are walking or driving on the final surface . Do the top two inches with limestone to avoid puncturing a tire .
 

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im curious how much are you guys saving vs a poured floor?
Stone cost was around 3600$, concrete was going to be 8-10,000$. The fabric under my stone was left over from a project at work so it was free. I used the asphalt from my driveway as a base.

I also left the grade low so that I only had to remove about 2 inches of stone if i ever wanted to pour concrete, I doubt i ever will because it's only a storage barn.

BTW I'd strongly suggest not using asphalt millings inside the barn. Asphalt has a lot of chemicals in it that will stink when it gets hot in the summer.
 

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I see you used fabric rather than plastic for moisture. I am still trying to find out what plastic the commercial guys would recommend.
 
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