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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am very interested in learning how to fish for steelhead,browns, and salmon in rivers, but I need a little advice to get me started. I went and did some observing today at sixth street dam, saw some steelies landed and some lost. I noticed some guys were fishing spawn and others fishing flies, does anyone have a preference? What is the best way for a beginner to rig up a line, and how far do most guys fish off bottom? What size rod and pound test do you reccomend? Also are there any spots near grand rapids where i can practice my techniques without getting in the way but may still get lucky and hook one up. As I said I am completely new to this and dont have anybody around to show me the ropes so any info at all is appreciated. Thanks alot
 

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Welcome To The Family..
Im Sure You Will Recieve Anwsers To All Of Your Questions From All Of The Experienced Fishermen We Have In This Tight Knit Family.

Carl
 

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First off welcome to the site.
I prefer a 8 1/2 to 9 foot med. action rod, with anywhere from 8 to 6 lb line ( I use yo zury line ) with a leader of 6 to 4 lb.
Spawn is usually the mainstay as far as bait goes, but flies also work along with plugs, & mepps spinners. It all depends on the mood of the fish, water clarity.
As far as where you can go to practice, just find a stream with steelhead, salmon in it and start to get to know it. That alone is a challenge.
Dont be afraid to ask other anglers you meet on the stream questions. I think you will find that most of them will be receptive.
Lastly patience is the key to sucess.
Good luck!
 

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Hey gvsufishin, welcome to the site.

I go to GVSU too and so does my boyfriend (whitetails_n_scales). He has recently gotten me interested in fishing. We've never done much out at the sixth street dam but have always thought about it. We like to go to Grand Haven and fish off the pier. If you ever need someone to go with send a message to either of us! :)

(the salmon at the bottom of my message and in my gallery was caught out of grand haven)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
What do you use to fish off the piers? Ive been interested in going to the piers and trying it out but I dont want to look like a fool since im not sure exactly what im doing yet. I'm also not quite sure about the 6th street dam, It looked a little scary to me but that might be just because the water is up so high. Thanks for the info everyone
 

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One suggestion that I would make that worked for me...Go out with a guide on both the big lake and in a river. Costs a little bit of money but if you are observant you will learn a great deal on technique, fishing holes, and many other things in a relatively short amount of time. This will help you get out with a little bit of confidence, Going for the first time can be overwhelming. Sometimes just launching the boat for the first time without holding up everyone in line at the launch can be stressful, let alone trying to catch a fish.
 

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You are quite correct that sixth street looks scary. It is DEADLY. People have gone down and don't come back up there. Not the ideal place to start! You need waders with very good traction, a tight wader belt and a staff is a very good idea. Start on a pier, preferably on a weekday. Take some spoons 1/2 - 3/4 ounce. Get there before the sun comes up. Cast until you are too tired and move around if you can. As soon as you get tired ask other guys to show you what they are using and how to rig up. You can use spoons, spawn, spinners, alewife... from piers. Go and learn and you may even come home with a fish, or two.

Good luck,
Mark
 

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Bookmaker noted the right equipment. For steelhead, try this setup: 6 lb. main line, then tie on a 4'-6' leader of 4 lb using a surgeons knot. Leave the tag end of the 4 lb about 3" long. On the tag end of the 4 lb, add enough split shot to keep your bait line bouncing along the bottom but not snagging. At the end of the leader, tie on either a fly like a stone fly, egg fly, etc. or use a No. 12 hook and spawn bag. Then just cast quartering upstream, keep your rod angled at 10:00 and follow the line on the downstream drift. Keep the line tight enough to feel the bottom ticks. Watch you drift speed and of you notice hesitation, extra speed, or a bump that's not a rock... set the hook. Keep your drag as light as possible because a steelhead will make a blazing first run. After the initial run you can crank down a little but be careful. Also know that in the river, when you get the fish in close, they like to make more fast runs until they are tired, so keep your drag as light as possible when they get close.
Fishing from shore is possible downstream from the fish ladder all the way to south of the Ford Museum. There are some good rock wiers in front of and just upstream from the Ford too.
Good luck.
 

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Gvsufishin, I will be going up to a BIG east side river in a few weeks I would be glad to show you a thing or two I have learned over the years from some great fishermen.
 

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GVSURFISHIN I see it says your from Mason you might check into the fishing class through L.C.C. it is taught by one of the best stream fisherman out there Jim Bedford. I'm not sure but it also use to include a van that they used for fishing trips.
 

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Hey.. the boyfriend is in North Carolina for the rest of the week, so I can't answer your question yet.... he usually rigs it up, hands it to me and i cast away. he has enough equipment here for both of us and usually more... so if you are ever interested we could meet you out there or something and show you what we do and talk to some other the guys out there. i will give a better response when i can ask Ryan about the rig itself. sorry not too much help!

do you live on or off campus?
 

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Hey GVSU, I like the choice of institutes of higher ed., but being an Okemos grad, I don't know about the whole bulldog bit.

If you want somebody to show you the game downtown let me know. The best time to learn sixth street is during the summer with low water, right now would not be a good time. Other than that, hook yourself up with someone who knows "the game" and soak up the info like a sponge. I started steelhead fishing my freshman year of college, now I'm in my 6th season and I still have alot to learn. If you want essentials, 9 ft rod, spinning reel with 8 pound test, swivels, 6 pound leader, flys/yarn/spawn, hooks, bobbers, split shot and drift sinkers, vest and time! I assume you're still in school which gives you an advantage, once you have a job, you're extra fishing time is screwed!

Give me a shout sometime
 
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