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there is enough info. about bass fishing if you're in the south but what about up here in MI. The water temps. are different and so will the type of baits to use. Is there a site or anyone who could give this angler some good tips on fishing in Michigan. I'm not talking about the big lakes so much as inland waters.
 

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Angler44, my son likes to use a Texas rig using 1/4 oz bullet weight and tipped with a kiwi color plastic worm. Last summer he caught a nice 14" 3lbs largemouth bass from shore. I like to use a silver/blue or silver/green Rat-L-Trap type lure. Also like using the BlueFox Vibrax in the same color and weight, 1/4 oz blade #2. And will at times switch to a double willow leaf spinner bait in white or chartruse. Hope this helps.
 

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Like Steve mentioned, both spinerbaits & floating stick baits work very well during early season. Since I very much favor surface fishing I prefer the stickbaits working them very slowly. When the water warms up in July, I switch to buzzbaits, Jitterbugs, & Pop'R's fished quite a bit faster. But during the last few years I've gone back to my flyrod and deerhair bugs worked noisly.
It's also been my experience over the years that if I had to choose one color of bass lure, that works mornings or evenings, rain or shine, it would black!
 

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Without addressing the specific topographical features of a given lake, here are a few general rules of thumb to try. The key word for this time of year is slow. I recommend working a large jig and pork combination fished on light line (8 to 10 pound). Retrieve it slowly along the bottom. As for color, it should to close to the color of the predominant forage species in the lake. If you don't know that color, I suggest using either a black and blue combination (universally effective) or an orange and brown combination (imitates crawfish).

Bass usually spawn around a full moon after the water surface temperature has reach a sustained 63 - 68 degrees F. Because their metabolism is based on water temperature, bass will feed at lower temperatures, but generally seem to become more active when the surface temperature is above 55 degrees F. They are very active in waters over 60 degrees.

If you plan your trips to lakes so you are there as they are reaching on the 60 plus degrees surface temperatures, you can actually have a month or two of pre-spawn fishing.
 
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